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Titles to Look Out For:
in alphabetical order, dated to earliest edition. Each listing includes later editions and printings]
1975. Merchant Ships of The World in Colour by Laurence Dunn (artist & author)
1970. Modern Ships by Reginald Carpenter, D. S. C.
1996. Ore-Oil-Bulk. A Pictorial History of Bulk Shipping Losses During the 1980's by Thomas F. Zera
1985. Seahorses of the Tees: The Story of Tees Towing Company Limited by John H. Proud
1986. Ships and Shipbuilders of a Westcountry Seaport. Fowey 1786-1939 by C. H. Ward-Jackson

On Amazon:
Dunn, Laurence. 'Merchant Ships of the World in Colour 1910-1929', published in 1975 by Blandford Press, in hardback with dustjacket, ISBN 0713705698. Sorry, sold out, but click image to access prebuilt search for this title on Amazon UK
1975, Blandford Press, hbk
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About the Series: Merchant Ships of the World in Colour presents in several volumes a pictorial survey of the merchant ship, whether it be a liner, tramp steamer, collier or coaster, looking at its development in the last 100 years. Each book describes the vessels of a single period, illustrating a representative selection, providing ownership, construction and performance details, as well as looking at other aspects.

About this book/synopsis:
This book describes the vessels of 1910-1929, and is packed with 80 glossy colour illustrations drawn by the author. The 1910-29 period was one of spectacular development and dramatic contrast - the Great War brought an end to a period of intense competition, reflected in a rapid increase in the size of individual liners; later during the Twenties, a more restrained style emerged, less lavishly appointed and more suited to a less-affluent world. The styles of these two periods, separated by the anonymous, camouflage-conscious years of the war were quite distinct, the post-war years bringing in a range of new shapes and profiles. To these, the by now emergent diesel engine made its own contribution, many of the early motorships having no funnel.

List of Ships Illustrated & Described in Colour (grouped by nation)
Canada
1913. S.S. Empress of Russia. Owned by the Canadian Pacific Railway
1929. S. S. Lady Rodney. Owned by Canadian National Steamships
Denmark
1912. M. V. Selandia owned by The East Asiatic Co.
France
1911. S. S. France owned by Cie. Générale Transatlantique
1914. S. S. Providence owned by Fabre Line
1929. M. V. Eridan owned by Cie. des Messageries Maritimes
Germany
1913. S. S. Imperator owned by Hamburg-American Line
1926. M. V. Barbara. Managers: Rob. M. Sloman Jr.
1928. M. V. Orinoco owned by the Hamburg-American Line
Great Britain
1910. S. S. Balmoral Castle owned by Union-Castle Mail S. S. Co. Ltd
1910. S. S. Howick Hall owned by Chas G. Dunn & Co. Ltd.
1911. S. S. Laconia owned by Cunard Line
1911. S. S. Olympic owned by White Star Line
1911. S. S. Rotorua (ex-Shropshire) owned by New Zealand Shipping Co. Ltd
1911. S. S. Erinpura owned by British India S. Nav. Co. Ltd
1912. S. S. Vauban, owned by Lamport & Holborn Ltd
1912. S. S. British Marshal, 1912 owned by Eagle Oil Transport Co. Ltd
1914. S. S. Aquitania, 1914 owned by Cunard Line
1929. S. S. Melrose Abbey owned by Associated Humber Lines
1914. S. S. Macclesfied owned by Associated Humber Lines
1915. S. S. Shantung owned by China Navigation Ltd.
1917. S. S. Belgic. Owned by White Star Line
1919. Aux. M.V. Molliette owned by B. Oppenheimer; also (in same picture) the tug Cretecable owned by Stelp and Leighton
1920. S. S. Yorkshire, owned by Bibby Line
1921. S. S. Huntsman owned by T. & J. Harrison
1921. M. V. ABA after 1921 conversion owned by Elder Dempster & Co. Ltd
1921. S. S. Chartered, 1921 owned by Gas Light & Coke Co.; also S. S. Corchester, 1927 owned by Cory Colliers Ltd
1922. S. S. Automedon, owned by Alfred Holt & Co.
1922. S. S. Jervis Bay owned by Aberdeen & Commonwealth
1923. S. S. Doric owned by White Star Line
1923. S. S. Minnewaska owned by Atlantic Transport Co. Ltd.
1923. M. V. Margretian owned by O. & W. Williams & Co.
1923. M. V. Margetian owned by O. & W. Williams & Co. and also S. S. Uskhaven owned by Richard W. Jones & Co. Ltd.
1923. M. V. Canis rebuilt c. 1918 owned by Det Bergenske D/S A/S and also M. V. Capable, converted 1924 owned by F. T. Everard & Sons Ltd
1927 S. S. Avila (later Avila Star), 1927 owned by Blue Star Line Ltd
1927. M. V. Pacific Reliance, owned by Furness Withy & Co.
1927. S. S. Kedah owned by Straits S. S. Co. Ltd
1928. S. S. Beaverford owned by Canadian Pacific Railway Co.
1928. S. S. Parracombe owned by Pyman Bros. Ltd.
1914. S. S. Southern Express (ex-San Jeronimo) owned by Southern Whaling & Sealing Co. Ltd.
1929. M. V. Highland Chieftain, owned by Nelson Steam Navigation Co. Ltd.
Greece
1914. S. S. Vasilefs Constantinos, owned by National Steam Navigation Co. of Greece, Ltd
1926. S. S. Patris II, owned by National Steam Navigation Co. of Greece
Holland
1911. S. S. Karimoen owned by Stoomvart Mij. 'Nederland'
1922. S. S. Spaarndam owned by Holland-America Line
1922. S. S. Klipfontein, owned by Holland-South Africa Line
1929. M. V. Baloeran, owned by Rotterdam Lloyd
Italy
1911. S. S. San Guglielmo, owned by "Sicula Americana" Soc. di Nav.
Japan
1914. S. S. Suwa Maru, owned by Nippon Yusen Kaisha
1918. Arabia Maru, owned by Osaka Shosen Kaisha
Norway
1951. S. S. Brant Country, owned by Det Bergenske D/S A/S (County Line)
1918. S. S. Stavangerfjord, owned by Den Norske Amerikalinje A/S
1920. M. V. Sardinia, owned by Fred Olsen & Co.
Portugal
1911. S. S. Cunene, owned by Soc. Geral de Commercio, Industria e Transportes, Ltd.
Spain
1912. S. S. Infanta Isabel owned by Pinillos Izquierdo & Co.
1913. S. S. Reina Victoria-Eugenia owned by Compania Trasatlantica
1928. M. V. Infanta Beatriz owned by Compania Trasmediterranea
Sweden
1910. S. S. Atland owned by Axel Brostrom & Son
USA
1911. S. S. Titives, owned by United Fruit Corporation
1913. S. S. Matsonia, owned by Matson Navigation Co.
1920. S. S. American Merchant, owned by United States Lines
1920. S. S. President Van Buren, owned by Unites States Lines
1921. S. S. President Harding, owned by United States Lines
1921. S. S. Mount Clinton, owned by United American Lines

Illustrations Two to a Page (following on in order from illustrations above):
Australia
1912. S. S. Indarra owned by Australasian United Steam Navigation Co. Ltd
Belgium
1913. S. S. Stad Antwerpen
Canada
1925. Princess Marguerite owned by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company
Finland
1921. S. S. Carelia owned by Finland S. S Co. Ltd.
France
1918. Commandant de Rose (steam schooner) owned by the French Government
Germany
1929. S. S. Isar, owned by Norddeutsche Lloyds
Great Britain
1910. S. S. Royal Scot, owned by London & Edinburgh Steam Shipping. Co. Ltd.
1910. S. S. London Queen, owned by London & Channel Islands S. S. Co. Ltd.
1911. S. S. Normannia, owned by the London & South West Railway Co.
1916. S. S. Lady Cloe, owned by the British & Irish Packet Co. Ltd
1917. S. S. Darino, owned by Ellerman Lines Ltd
1918. S. S. War Viper, owned by The Shipping Controller
1918. Wooden S. S. War Mingan owned by The Shipping Controller
1920. S. S. Jolly Bruce owned by Walford Lines Ltd
1920. S. S. Topaz owned by William Robertson
1921. S. S. Gannet owned by General Steam Navigation Co. Ltd
1922. S. S. Malines owned by London & North Eastern Railway Company
1923. S. S. Bernicia owned by Tyne Tees Shipping Co. Ltd.
1923. S. S. Avoceta owned by Yeoward Line Ltd.
1925. S. S. Inverlago, owned by Lago Shipping Co. Ltd
1926. S. S. Nerissa, owned by C. T. Bowring & Co. Ltd
1929. M. V. Ulster Monarch owned by Belfast S. S. Co. Ltd.
Holland
1920. S. S. Batavier II owned by Wm H. Muller & Co
Malta
1929. S. S. Knight of Malta owned by Cassar Co. Ltd
Norway
1930. M. V. Brabant owned by Fred. Olsen & Co.
1926. M. V. Belray owned by Christen Smith
Russia
1929. M. V. Smolni owned by Sovtorgflot
1912. M. V. Suecia owned by Axel Axelson Johnson
Sweden
1929. S. S. Britannia owned by Swedish Lloyd
1925. M. V. Svealand owned by Tirfing S. S. Co. Ltd
USA
1922. M. V. Missourian owned by American-Hawaiian S. S. Co. Ltd
And plate 96 shows her rebuilt in 1955 as Flaminia owned by the Codegar line

About the Author:
Laurence Dunn at the time of publication was Vice-President of the World Ship Society and a member of the Belgian Nautrical Research Association. He was a consultant on ship design and a well-known author and artist on maritime subjects, producing clear. concise texts and precise illustrations


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Cargo Ships:
Carpenter, Reginald. 'Modern Ships' published in hardback in 1970 by Model & Allied Publications. Condition: Good, clean condition, but the dustjacket has a touch of edge-wear at the extremities of the spine and as a vintage book, it has mild handling wear and faint marks here and there on the exterior. Price: GBP12.99, not including post and packing, which is Amazon's standard charge (currently GBP2.80 for UK buyers, more for overseas customers)
1970, Model & Allied Publications, hbk
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  • Modern Ships [top]
    Written by Reginald Carpenter, D.S.C
    First published in 1970 in Great Britain by Model & Allied Publications Ltd in hardback with dustjacket, 220pp. Original UK retail price: £5.00

About the Book: The author Reginal Carpenter, a civil servant, spent the war years in the Navy and emerged with his love of the sea even greater than before. This book covers a very broad cross-section of the shipping industry during the 15 years up to publication (1970), which was a time of great change in the sector. It looks at the new generation of ships that emerged and at the evolution of the ships which remained unaltered in their basic design. It also looks at the simultaneous development of docks and installations, many of which had to be built in isolated and uninhabited territory as near as possible to the sources of new raw materials.

The book describes (but in lesser detail) the shipbuilding facilities which in their turn have been developed or newly created to meet the demands of shipowners. The final section of the book deals with organisations and bodies which are closely connected with ships, but which operate to some extent in the background and are often overlooked in books on shipping. .

It includes many hundreds of half-tone illustrations from photographs, profile drawings of ships, line drawings that explain particular shipping practices, ships lines produced from technical works, and wash paintings by the author.

The chapters are:
1. Oil Tankers. Looks also at tonnage and tank cleaning
2. Bulk Carriers.
3. Container Ships.
4. Vehicle Ferries & Short Sea Cargo Ships.
5. Passenger Lines.
6. Cargo Liners, Meat & Fruit Ships,
7. Crew Accommodation
8. Coastal Ships.
9. Tugs.
10. Cargo Handling.
11. 12- Passenger Cargo Liners.
12. Miscellaneous Ships
13. Trawlers

Appendices

The Corporation of Lloyds - history of Lloyds of London, Underwriting Members, Syndicates, Brokers, Placing A Risk, Casualty Board, Casualty Book, Lloyd's Agents, Intelligence and Publications
1) Lloyd's Register of Shipping - history, Constitution and Management, Committees, Finances, Staff, Offices, The Printing House, Research Laboratory, Structural Test House, Classification, Periodical Surveys
2) The Register Book, Rules, Technical Records, Research, Computer Services, Load Lines, Safety and Tonnage
3) The Baltic Merchantile and Shipping (chartering, the sale and purchase of ships
4) The Chamber of Shipping of the United Kingdom
5) The British Shipping Federation
6) The Corporation of Trinity House
7. Entry to the Merchandise Service

Ships Included:
For all of the below, the book usually gives details of the owners (at the time of publication), builders, engines installed, how many screws, service speed, overall length, beam length, deadweight tonnage and what services are operated by the boat and where. For some of the ships, there are the profile drawings.

Oil Tankers included (in order of appearance)
1967. M. S. Myrina (Builders: Harland & Wolff)
1939. M. S. Florida (Builders: Sun Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company)
1963. M. S. Borgsten (Builders: Joseph L. Thompson)
1966. M. S. Oriental Dragon (Builders: Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd)
1966. M. S. Ferncrest (Builders: Odense Staalskibsvaerft A/S)
1963. M. S. Berge Bergesen (Builders: A/S Rosenberg M/V, Stavanger)
1968. S. S. Bulford (Builders: Sasebo Heavy Industries Co. Ltd)
1969. S. S. Esso Northumbria (Builders: Swan Hunter and Tyne Shipbuilding Ltd-Wallsend Yard)
1965. S. S. British Admiral (Builders: Vickers Ltd; Steam Turbines by Vickers-Armstrongs)
1967. M. S. Imperial Ottawa (Builders: Kawasaki Dockyard Co. Ltd)
1966. S. S. Idemitsu Maru (Builders: Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd)
1966. M. S. Kaho Maru (Builders: Hitachi Shipbuilding and Engineering Co. Ltd)
1965. S. S. World Friendship (Builders not stated)

Bulk Carriers included (in order of appearance)
1969. M. S. Flowergate (Builders: A/B Gotaverken)
1967. M. S. Nuolja (Builders: A/B Gotaverken)
1968. M. S. OBO Prince (Builders: A/B Gotaverken)
1966. M. V. Stonepool (Builders: Charles Connell & Co (Shipbuilders) Ltd)
1964. M. S. Wearfield (Builders: Austin and Pickersgill Ltd)
1967. M. S. Sigsilver (Builders: Ishikawajima Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd)
1968. M. S. Sugar Producer (Builders: Lithgows Ltd)
1966. M. S. Cotswold Ltd (Builders: Furness Shipbuilding Co. Ltd)
1967. M. S. Vestan (Builders: Hitachi Shipbuilding and Engineering Co. Ltd)
1966. S. S. Cedros (Builders: The Kure Shipbuilding and Engineering Co. Ltd)
1968. M. S. Skaufast (Builders: Harland & Wolff Ltd)
1966. M. S. World Soya (Builders: Sasebo Heavy Industries)
1968. M. S. Baron Cawdor (Builders: Marinens Hovederft)
S.D.14 Type (Builders: Austin and Pickersgill)
"Freedom Class" (Builders: Ishakawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Ltd)

Container Ships included (in order of appearance)
1969. S. S. Encounter Bay (Builders: Container Ship Consortium, Hamburg)
1967. S. S. American Lancer (Builders: Sun Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., Chester, PA.)
1967. M. S. Manchester Port (Builders: Smith's Dock Co. Ltd)
1969. M. S. Manchester Challenge (Builders: Smith's Dock Co. Ltd)
1967. M. S. Atlantic Span (Builders: Rheinstaal Nordseewerke)
1968. M. S. Hakone Maru (Builders: Mitsubishi Heavy Industries)
1968. M. S. Elbe Express (Builders: Blohm and Voss)
1967. M. S. Arcturus (Builders: Busumer Werft)
1968. M. S. Impala (Builders: J. J. Sietas Shipyard)

Vehicle Ferries and Short Sea Cargo Ships (in order of appearance)
1968. M. S. Europic Ferry (Builders: Swan Hunter (Shipbuilders) Ltd
1967. M. S. Ulster Queen (Builders: Cammell Laird & Co (Shipbuilders & Engineers Ltd, Birkenhead)
1968. M. S. Danmark (Builders: Elsinore Shipbuilding & Engineering Co. Ltd)
1964. M. S. Cambridge Ferry (Builders: Hawthorn Leslie (Shipbuilders) Ltd)
1968. M. S. Lion (Builders: Cammell Laird & Co. Ltd)
1968. M. S. Dyvi (Builders: A/S Tangen Verft and Nylands Verksted)
1968. M. S. Sea Freightliner I (Builders: John Redhead & Co Ltd)
1967. M. S. Free Enterprise III (Builders: Werf "Gusto", Schiedam
1968. M. S. Winston Churchill (Builders: Cantieri Navali del Tirreno E Riuniti)
S. S. Newhaven (no details)
M. S. Finnhansa (Builders: Wartsila Kon, Sandvikens Skepps, Helsingfors)
1966. M. S. Spero (Builders: Cammell Laird (Shipbuilders & Engineers Ltd)
1967. M. S. Hawea (Builders: Taikoo Dockyard and Engineering Co. of Hong Kong Ltd)
1966. M. S. Patricia (Builders: A/B Lindholmens Vary, Gothenburg
1968. M. S. Leopard (Builders: Ateliers et Chantiers de Bretagne)
1961. M. S. Buffalo (Builders: Ardrossan Dockyard
M. S. Dorset Coast (no details)
1969, M. V. Transcontainer 1
1966. M. S. Rynstroom (Builders: Arnhemsche Scheepsbouw)
1959. M. S. Princess of Tasmania (Builders: Australian Shipbuilding Board)
1965. M. S. Clio (Builders: Wartsila Crichton - Vulcan, Turku)
1966. M. S. Pasteur

Passenger Liners (in order of appearance)
1965. M. S. Kungsholm (Builders: John Brown & Co. (Clydebank) Ltd
1959. S. S. Rotterdam (Builders: Rotterdam Dry Dock Co.)
1961. S. S. Empress of Canada (Builders: Vickers Armstrongs (Shipbuilders) Ltd)
1953. S. S. Santa Maria (Builders: J. Cockerill-Ougree S. A.)
1965. M. S. Sagafjord (Builders: Societe des Forges et Chantiers de la Méditeranée, La Seyne)
1961. S. S. France (Builders: Chantier de L'Atlantique, Penhoet Yard, St. Nazaire)
1965. S. S. Raffaello (Builders: Not Specified)
1963. S. S. Santa Magdalena (Builders: Bethlehem Steel Company, Shipbuilding Division)
1955. M. S. Polar Star (Builders: Blohm and Voss)
1938. S. S. Bremen (Builders: Not Specified)
M. S. Angelino Lauro (Date & Builders Not Specified)
1961. S. S. Flavia (Builders: Not Specified)
1957. M. V. Prins Der Nederlanden (Builders: Machinefabriek en Scheepswerf, Van P. Smit Jr., Rotterdam)
1961. Fritz Heckert (Builders: VEB Mathias-Thesen Werft)
1944. S. S. President Roosevelt (Builders: Not Specified)
1962. M. S. Illiria (Builders: Not Specified)
1954. S. S. Carmania (Builders: John Brown & Co. Ltd)
1900. S. S. Ivernia (Builders: Not Specified)
1896. S. S. Tintagel Castle (Builders: Not Specified)

Cargo Liners, Meat and Fruit Ships (in order of appearance):
1967. M. S. S. A. Van Der Stel (Builders: Verolme Schpsw)
1968. M. S. River Niger (Bulders: Rheinstahl Nordseewerke G.M.B.H., Emden)
1962. M. S. Clan Grant (Builders: Greenock Dockyard Co. Ltd)
1965. M. S. Hammonia (Builders: Blohm & Voss)
1965. M. S. Shahristan (Builders: J. Readhead & Sons Ltd)
1968. M. S. Friesenstein (Builders: Lubecker Flenderwerke)
1960. M. S. Ondine (Builders: Chantiers Naval des Flandres, Bruges)
1952. M. S. Ebro (Builders: Harland and Wolff)
1961. S. S. Del Rio (Builders: Avondale Shipyards)
1967. M. S. France Maru (Builders: Kawasaki Dockyard Co. Ltd)
1967. M. S. Straat Holland (Builders: Nippon Kokan Kabushiki Kaisha)
1966. M. S. Athenian (Builders: H. Robb & Co. Ltd., Leith)
1961. S. S. Chuscal (Builders: Alexander Stephen & Sons Ltd)
1968. M. S. Mataura (Builders: Mitsui Shipbuilding And Engineering Co. Ltd)
1968. M. S. Port Chalmers (Builders: Upper Clyde Shipbuilders Ltd., Linthouse Division)
1966. M. S. Tugelaland (Builders: Deutsche Werft, Hamburg)
1965. M. S. Samaria (Builders: Cammell, Laird & Co.)
1964. S. S. Mormacvega (Builders: Ingalls Ship Building Corporation)
1967. M. S. Strathardle (Builders: Mitsui Shipbuilding and Engineering Co. Ltd)
1966. M. S. Bremen Maru (Builders: Mitsui Shipbuilding and Engineering Co. Ltd)
1968. M. S. San Joaquin Valley (Builders: Wartsila Kon. Sandvikens Skepps, Helsingfors)
1966. M. S. Good Hope Castle (Builders: Swan Hunter and Wigham Richardson Ltd)
1966. M. S. Fauna (Builders: Schifft, Unterweser, Bremerhaven)
1968. M. S. Magician (Builders: The Doxford & Sunderland Shipbuilding and Engineering Co. Ltd)
1963. M. S. Finnforest (Builders: Rheinstahl Nordseewerke)
1952. M. S. Oswestry Grange (Builders: Hawthorn Leslie & Co. Ltd)
1964. M. S. Fort Trinite (Builders: Chantiers & Ateliers de Provence)
1968. M. S. Polar Equador (Builders: Blohm and Voss)
1966. M. S. Priam (Builders: Vickers Ltd.)

Coastal Shipping (in order of appearance)
1966. M. S. Kingsnorth Fisher (Builders: Hall Russell & Co. Ltd)
1948. M. S. Fulham (Builders Burntisland Shipbuilding Co. Ltd)
1960. M. S. Harald Jarl (Builders: A/S Trondhjems Dampskibsselskab)
1964. M. S. Chelwood (Builders: Bartram & Son Ltd)
M. V. Heerengracht (No date or builders specified)
M. V. Esso Hythe (No date or builders specified)
1967. M. S. Esso Fawley (Builders: A/B Lindholmens Varv., Gothenburg)
1963. M. S. Gillian Everard (Builders: Clelands Ship Building Co. Ltd)
1950. M. S. St. Ninian (Builders: Caledon Ship Building and Engineering Co. Ltd)
1961. M. S. Cornishbrook (Builders: Clelands Shipbuilding Co. Ltd)

Tugs (in order of appearance)
1965. M. T. Englishman (Builders: Cochrane & Sons Ltd., Hull)
1966. M. T. Alice L. Moran (Builders: Kure Ship Building and Engineering Co.)
M. T. Dingle Bay (No date specified. Builders: Hessle Yard of Richard Dunston)
1969. M. T. Rode Zee (Builders: N. V. Scheepswerf en Machinefabriek "De Merwede"
1958. D. E. P. T. Griper (Date and builders not specified)
M. S. Britonia (Date and builders not specified)
M. S. Bever

Miscellaneous Ships (in order of appearance)
1952. S. S. Uganda (Builders: Barclay, Curle & Co)
1966. M. S. Lady Delia (Builders: Brooke Marine Ltd)
R. R. S. John Biscoe (Builders: Fleming and Ferguson)
Sail Training Ship Nippon Maru(Builders: Kawasaki Dockyard Co. Ltd., Kobe)
1962. C. S. Mercury (Builders: Cammell Laird & Co. (Shipbuilders and Engineers Ltd)
1958. M. V. John Ashley (Builders not specified)
T. H. V Stella (Date not specified, builders: J. Samuel White & Co. Ltd)
T. H. V. Lodesman (Date not specified, builders: R. S. Stokvis and Zonen, Rotterdam)
1962. M. S. The Lady Patricia (Builders: Charles Hill & Sons Ltd., Bristol)
1964. M. S. Methane Princess (Builders: Vickers-Armstrongs (Shipbuilders) Ltd
1968. M. S. Albright Pioneer (Builders: Swan Hunter and Tyne Shipbuilders
1968. M. S. Humboldt (Builders: Chantiers Navals de la Ciotat)
1964. M. S. Naess Texas (Builders: Furness Shipbuilding Co. Ltd)
Hydrofoil Manu Wai (Date and Builders Not Specified)
1954. M. S. General San Martin (Builders: A. G. "Weser")
1967. M. S. Cementia (Builders: Deutsche Werft A. G.)
M. S. Alcoa Seaprobe

Trawlers (in order of appearance)
1952. S. T. Vannessa (Builders: Cook, Welton and Gemmell Ltd.)
1967. M. T. Maria Polivanova (Builders: Ateliers and Chantiers de Nantes (Bretagne-Loire)
1963. M. T. Ross Daring (Builders: Cochrance & Sons, Ltd)

 

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Cruise Liners

Zera, Thomas F. Ore-Oil-Bulk: A Pictorial History of Bulk Shipping Losses During the 1980s', published in 1996 in the United States in hardback with dustjacket, 189pp, ISBN 0964393778. Sorry, sold out, but click image to access prebuilt search for this title on Amazon UK
1996, hbk, Rutledge Books
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About this book/synopsis: In this fascinating book, ORE-OIL-BULK, Thomas Zera takes an intriguing look at the world of shipping. Subtitled 'A Pictorial History of Bulk Shipping Losses During the 1980's', here are the true stories of 208 bulk carriers, tankers, and passenger vessels that sunk or were deemed unsalvageable

Featuring maps, pictures, photographs, and diagrams, this fact-filled book brings each sinking to life, whilst the accompanying text meticulously details the crucial event from its beginning to its loss or its final scrapping. This complete reference manual also includes full descriptions, statistics, and other pertinent information from noted sources, such as dimensions, ownership, voyage, tonnage, and builders. Includes a bibliography and index

The author writes that his main reason for writing the book came about when he noticed the lack of press coverage pertaining to shipping losses in recent times except when they caused environmental disasters or massive loss of life. Often huge shipping losses would be covered by a mere couple of lines mention in a publication. Before 1980, almost all major shipping losses were reported as being important news events, especially during the age of passenger ships and then to the birth of the bulk carrier in the 1950s.

This book is a collection of 208 bulk carriers, tankers and passenger vessels, which became total losses during the 1980s and is split into chapters dealing with each year of the 1980s separately. The author makes the point that it would have been impossible for him to research every loss during that decade, so he had to very quickly decide the limits of his work, which are:

  1. Each vessel lost had to either have sunk or be unrefloatable regardless of the cause
  2. Each vessel had to have a minimum weight of 10,000 gross tons
  3. Each vessel had to be written off as a total loss

The book gives statistics for each vessel from the date of loss, owners, builders, year built, gross/dead weight tons, dimensions in meters/feet (length x width x draft), former names and last voyage. The date of loss pertains to the first day of the casualty leading to the vessel's ultimate loss. The dates alongside the former names reflects the final year that the name was used. All information concerning each casualty came from many sources, but if there was any question hanging over the data, then the information used was taken from the source considered to be the more reliable. The author has included a picture of each vessel and every effort was made to source these from the original sources whereever they may have appeared
For each year within the book, there is a list of the ships lost in alphabetical order of their name. Each ship lost is numbered and each number is recorded on the location of its loss on a corresponding map.

1980. Name; Date of loss (dd/mm/yyyy)
1. Agios Giorgis, 07/01/1980
2. Albahaa B., lost 03/04/1980
3. Artemis, lost 27/12/1980
4. Athlos, lost 30/07/1980
5. Blossom (Bow), lost 31/12/1980
6. Cidade de Belo Horizonte, lost 28/09/1980
7. Derbyshire, lost 09/09/1980
8. Don Segundo Sombra, lost 22/01/1980
9. Dunav, lost 28/12/1980
10. Energy Concentration, lost 22/07/1980
11. Hae Dang Wha, lost 23/07/1980
12. Hongjin, lost 24/12/1979
13. Irenes Serenade, lost 23/02/1980
14. Jin Yang No. 11, lost 09/07/1980
15. Lee Wang Zin, lost 25/12/1979
16. Leonardo da Vinci, lost 03/07/1980
17. Maria Alejandra, lost 11/03/1980
18. Maria Bacolitsa, lost 01/03/1980
19. Mycene, lost 03/04/1980
20. Onomichi Maru (Bow), lost 30/12/1980
21. Poet, lost 25/10/1980
22. Rasa Sayang, lost 27/08/1980
23. Salem, lost 16/01/1980
24. Sandalion, lost 27/11/1980
25. Saudi-Filipinas I, lost 06/06/1980
26. Star K., lost 25/03/1980
27. Sunrise, lost 13/06/1980
28. Tanio (Bow), lost 07/03/1980
29. Theomitor, lost 13/08/1980
30. Volare, lost 29/11/1980
31. Zenlin Glory, lost 22/05/1980

1981. Name; Date of loss (dd/mm/yyyy)
32. Angelina, lost 04/06/1981
33. Antiparos, lost 03/01/1981
34. Blossom (Stern)
35. Cavo Cambanos, lost 29/03/1981
36. Chemical Challenger, lost 28/10/1981
37. Deifovos, lost 25/01/1981
38. Feddy, lost 10/02/1981
39. Fourkero II, lost 19/08/1981
40. Globe Asimi, 21/11/1981
41. Golden Pine, lost 02/01/1981
42. Iran Rezvan, lost 25/10/1981
43. Jari, lost 02/04/1981
44. Louise I, lost 20/05/1981
45. Marina Di Equa, lost 29/12/1981
46. Mezada, lost 07/03/1981
47. Navarino, 26/11/1981
48. Ocean Ace, lost 21/08/1981
49. Onomichi Maru (Stern)
50. Primrose, lost 02/08/1981
51. Reina Del Mar, lost 28/03/1981
52. Rio Bravo, lost 24/03/1981
53. Seiryu, lost 30/10/1981
54. Super Servant 2, lost 29/01/1981
55. Zephyr, 13/01/1981

1982. Name; Date of loss (dd/mm/yyyy)
56. Academy Star, lost 19/03/1982
57. Atlantic Conveyor, lost 25/05/1982
58. Char Hsing, 21/05/1982
59. Corinthian, 20/08/1982
60. Eastern Kin, lost 09/01/1982
61. Gogo Runner, lost 23/06/1982
62. Golden Dolphin, lost 06/03/1982
63. Hercules, lost 08/06/1982
64. Iniciativa, lost 1982
65. Iran Hojjat, lost 05/11/1982
66. Orient Treasury, lost 09/02/1982
67. Raffaelo, lost 21/11/1982
68. Rhodian Sailor, lost 25/12/1982
69. Scapmount, lost 18/12/1982
70. Unirea, lost 13/10/1982
71. Victory (bow), lost 12/02/1982
72. Victory (stern), lost 12/02/1982

1983. Name; Date of loss (dd/mm/yyyy)
73. Anthony P., lost 15/02/1983
74. Antigoni, lost 21/11/1983
75. Assimi, lost 07/01/1983
76. Bailee, lost 20/11/1983
77. Castillo de Bellver (stern), lost 05/08/1983
78. Castillo de Bellver (bow)
79. Da Qing 236, lost 11/10/1983
80. Dimitrios, 01/02/1983
81. Elena, lost 08/10/1983
82. Good Lion, lost 19/12/1983
83. Hydo, lost 02/09/1983
84. Iran Jenan, lost 1983
85. Korean Castle, lost 02/10/1983
86. Long XI Kou, lost 19/04/1983
87. Marine Electric, lost 12/02/1983
88. Pan Nova, lost 09/09/1983
89. Panoceanic Fame, lost 15/05/1983
90. Pericles G. C., lost 09/12/1983
91. PNOC Basilan, lost 26/11/1983
92. Regent Oak, lost 29/07/1983
93. Tarpon Sentinel, lost 19/10/1983
94. TIFOSO, lost 20/01/1983

1984. Name; Date of loss (dd/mm/yyyy)
95. Alppi, lost 24/01/1984
96. American Eagle, 26/02/1984
97. Antacus, lost 16/07/1984
98. APJ Ambika, lost 01/03/1984
99. Catherine Y., lost 02/11/1984
100. Clearwater Bay, lost 1984
101. Columbus C., lost 29/07/1984
102. Fidelity, lost 18/05/1984
103. Henningsdorf, lost 19/09/1984
104. Jervis Bay, lost 24/01/1984
105. Kalliopi A., lost 26/11/1984
106. Pelagos, lost 16/03/1984
107. Perito Moreno, lost 28/06/1984
108. Promitheus, lost 02/03/1984
109. Puerto Rican (Stern), lost 31/10/1984
110. Rover Star, lost 16/10/1984
111. Shannon, 16/02/1984
112. Sundancer, 29/06/1984
113. Tesubu II, lost 26/06/1984
114. Thomas K., 28/01/1984
115. Tito Campanella, lost 14/01/1984

1985. Name; Date of loss (dd/mm/yyyy)
116. Arctic Career, lost 25/06/1985
117. Ariadne, lost 24/08/1985
118. Caribbean Carrier, lost 05/11/1985
119. Choong Yong, lost 23/11/1985
120. Dennis Carrier, lost 21/06/1985
121. Fotini D.E, lost 23/07/1985.
122. Fuji, lost 08/04/1985
123. Hope Star, lost 22/01/1985
124. John P., lost 17/04/1985
125. Kapodistrias, lost 29/07/1985
126. Karin Vatis, lost 15/11/1985
127. Lyudvik Svoboda, lost 06/03/1985
128. Lyudvik Svoboda (stern)
129. Mara Hope, lost 21/03/1985
130. Maratha Transhipper, lost 28/05/1985
131. Mariner II, lost 23/04/1985
132. Nawabshah, lost 23/08/1985
133. Neptunia, lost 14/02/1985
134. PAB, lost 16/08/1985
135. Petragen One, lost 26/05/1985
136. Sinoda, lost 14/09/1985
137. Son Bong, lost 19/09/1985
138. Tanfory, lost 04/03/1985

1986. Name; Date of loss (dd/mm/yyyy)
139. Admiral Nakhimov, lost 31/08/1986
140. Alexandros F., lost 07/05/1986
141. Angela Pando, lost 14/07/1986
142. Astoria, lost June 1986
143. Azarpad, lost 12/08/1986
144. Bonny Carrier, lost 02/01/1986
145. Canari, lost July 1986
146. Caribe Enterprise, lost 20/10/1986
147. Castillo de Salas (bow), lost 11/01/1986
148. Castillo de Salas (stern)
149. Daeyang Family, lost 30/03/1986
150. Detroit Edison, lost 20/12/1986
151. Hae Baraki, lost 28/08/1986
152. Harmony I, lost 08/05/1986
153. Ibn Al Beitar, lost 23/12/1986
154. Iran Dahr, lost 16/03/1986
155. Kowloon Bridge, lost 22/11/1986
156. Mikhail Lermontov, lost 16/02/1986
157. Panama Victory, lost 28/08/1986
158. Riviera Sky, lost 12/01/1986
159. Southern Cross, lost 04/06/1986
160. Triton, lost 26/08/1986

1987. Name; Date of loss (dd/mm/yyyy)
161. Alborada, lost 24/07/1987
162. Barkla, 24/10/1987
163. Cathay Seatrade, lost 13/01/1987
164. Cumberlande, lost 12/06/1987
165. Dayspring, lost 23/06/1987
166. Dona, lost 15/07/1987
167. Eleftheria II, lost 16/10/1987
168. Hanjin Incheon, lost 13/02/1987
169. Hyundai New World, lost 31/03/1987
170. Jhanski Ki Rani, lost 05/02/1987
171. Norman Atlantic, lost 06/12/1987
172. Olden, lost 02/02/1987
173. Pacbaroness, lost 21/09/1987
174. Paravalos, lost 01/07/1987
175. Qarouh, lost 15/12/1987
176. Quatsino Sound, lost 14/02/1987
177. Skipper I, lost 29/04/1987
178. Star Carrier, lost 22/06/1987
179. Testarossa, lost 13/01/1987
180. Tina/(11,541), lost 26/08/1987
181. Tina/(13,196), lost 11/02/1987
182. Topkapi-S, lost 29/10/1987
183. Vishva Anurag, lost 13/01/1987
184. Vishva Apurva, lost 06/08/1987
185. Xylos, lost 28/03/1987

1988. Name; Date of loss (dd/mm/yyyy)
186. Anangel Greatness, lost 06/09/1988
187. Athenian Venture (Bow), lost 22/04/1988
188. Athenian Venture (Stern)
189. Barcelona, lost 14/05/1988
190. Enders M. Voorhees, lost 24/01/1988
191. Korean Star, lost 20/05/1988
192. Mega Taurus, lost 13/12/1988
193. Oakland, lost 07/11/1988
194. Odyssey, lost 10/11/1988
195. Punta Medanos, lost 20/06/1988
196. Reijin, lost 26/04/1988
197. Singa Sea, lost 04/07/1988
198. Vinca Gorthon, lost 28/02/1988

1989. Name; Date of loss (dd/mm/yyyy)
199. Erica (bow), lost 16/05/1989
200. Erica (stern)
201. Kronos, lost 26/02/1989
202. Kumanovo, lost 05/01/1989
203. Lavia, lost 07/01/1989
204. Lung Hao, lost 11/09/1989
205. Maasgusar, lost 14/03/1989
206. Maassluis, lost 15/02/1989
207. Mercantil Marica, lost 21/10/1989
208. Murree, lost 28/10/1989
209. Norsul Trombetas, lost 14/11/1989
210. Orange Coral, lost 02/05/1989
211. Pan Dynasty, lost 04/10/1989
212. River Gurara, lost 26/02/1989
213. Sagheera, lostr 05/01/1989
214. Star of Alexandria, lost 17/04/1989
215. Sterling Grace, lost 07/12/1989
216. Vulca, lost 29/12/1989

 

Shipwrecks



Oil Tanker Wrecks


Bulk Carrier Wrecks


Deep Sea Shipping


Tanker Ships


Container Ships


Sunken Ships
Proud, John H. 'Seahorses of the Tees. The Story of Tees Towing Company Limited', published in 1985 in Great Britain by the Tees Towing Company Limited in hardback, 189pp, ISBN 0951023209. Condition: Very good. Price: £38.00, not including post and packing, which is Amazon UK's standard charge (currently £2.80 for UK buyers, more for overseas customers)
1985, Tees Towing Company Limited, hardback
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  • Seahorses of the Tees. The Story of Tees Towing Company Limited [top]
    Written by John H. Proud
    First published in 1985 in Great Britain by the Tees Towing Company Limited in hardback, 189pp, ISBN 0951023209
    Published in 1985 in Great Britain by the Tees Towing Company Limited in paperback, 189pp, ISBN 0951023217
    Cover design was specially commissioned for this book and was reproduced from an original painting by Barrie Wright of Kirkby-in-Cleveland. The design incorporates the outlines of three tugs: Acklam Cross of 1933, Lingdale of 1882 and Greatham Cross of 1976, seemingly viewed through a ship's port
    The FFEP (Front Free End Paper) shows a remarkably clear and detailed two-page black and white photograph of Acklam Cross in Middlesbrough Dock in September 1933 when newly-arrived from her builders in Aberdeen. From left to right on the monkey island are Captain Charlie Rounce and Cecil Crosthwaite; second from the left on the main deck is George Albert Robinson. In the background is a busy dock with Brocklebank and British India vessels in evidence (photo sourced from Stewart Bale)

Contents:
Foreword by Richard Crosthwaite
Acknowledgements
Abbreviations
Introduction

Part I. The Company History
1. Tees Towing Company Limited
2. William Henry Crosthwaite - his early life and first excursions into tug ownership, 1880-1908
3. The Constituent Companies, 1909-1919
4. Amalgamation - the early years of Tees Towing Company Limited, 1920-1925
5. Difficult Times, 1926-1931
6. A First Experiment in Diesel Propulsion 1932-1939
7. The Second World War, 1939-1945
8. From Steam to Diesel, 1946-1962
9. Building on experience - the demand for increased power, 1962-1975
10. Power with manoeuvrability - the modern fleet in Being, 1976-1983

Part II. Tug Details and Histories

Appendices
A. Source of Vessel Names
B. Shipbuilders
C. Engine Builders
D. Funnel, Flag and Hull Colours
E. Legend of Seahorse Insignia
F. Chart: Evolution of Tees Towing Co. Ltd.
G. Chart: Tug Ownership Chronology

About this book/synopsis: There are many reasons why a company would decide to have its history written; more often than not, a centenary provides a convenient excuse. However, in this case, the history came to be written due to the visit of a man who had just retired, John Proud, who found that he had time on his hands to indulge in his lifelong passion for tugs and decided to visit the Tees Towing Company. This book is more than a company history - it's the story of a man, of a family, of the men who built up the company, and of every tug that the Tees Towing Company ever operated. To tie it all together, John Proud decided that Richard Crosthwaite's grandfather should occupy centre stage in the book.

The author's interest in ships, and particularly in tugs, stemmed from the time when, in 1941, he was working at a factory overlooking the then un-developed Teesmouth estuary and Seal Sands area. Although at that time the activities of the tug fleet of Tees Towing obtained their approval and encouragement in the Autumn of 1981 and this present volume is the result. An early decision had to be made as to just what this history should cover and just as important, what it should not include - since the 19th Century story of towage on the River Tees is complicated and little documented. A satisfactory solution seemed to be to describe the period of existence of Tees Towing and its forbears throughout the lifetime of Sir William Crosthwaite and his descendants. Since Tees Towing is essentially a family firm, this approach allowed the story of the family and the companies to be told in parallel throughout the period 1880-1983. The history is interspersed with local, national and occasionally international events so that the company story can be located in the timescale of contemporary happenings. This procedure is useful for another reason in that the Crosthwaite family have been closely connected with a great many civic and other voluntary activities; thus their extra-business affairs can, for example be linked into the growth and development of the town of Middlesbrough.

Part 1 details the company history. The many innovative developments introduced by Tees Towing are given special emphasis; and all of the tugs and associated vessels owned or managed are referred to. Where figures in brackets are set out like this: (87/1884) after a vessel, the numbers are referring to gross tonnage and year built. The book will also indicate with a (1) or a (2) after a vessel if a given boat was the first (or second) to be given that name in the fleet. Where the size of a vessel is of interest to the context, the measurements are given in length x beam. Over the years, the tugs have participated in many salvage events and brief descriptions of only a few of these are given and these are either taken from contemporary accounts or compiled from personal reminiscences.

Part 2 gives the full technical details, origins, histories and fates of almost all of the eighty vessels owned to the end of 1983. About 75% of the histories are accompanied by a photograph of the tug involved, which is aimed at giving the reader the general appearance and outline of a particular tug. All the tugs since 1933 have photographs but the author had difficulties finding all the pictures for all the tugs prior to that year.

Various appendices complete the book giving critical data and supplementary information on vessel names, shipbuilders, engine builders, funnel and flag colours, the Seahorse insignia and ownership evolution and chronology

Illustrations (all black and white):
Figure 1. The Lingdale tug assisted by other units of the fleet taking control of London Victory after her launch from the Furness Shipyard, September 1951
Fig. 2. Scale map of the River Tees from the Tees Bay and estuary upstream to Stockton-on-Tees showing many of the locations and features referred to in the text and photograph captions. The line of the lower reaches of the river has changed considerably over the years. The map shows the situation as in 1983
Fig. 3. Photograph of Thomas and Jane Crosthwaite and their family about 1900. Their six children are (left to right, back row): Frederick, John Thomas, Laura May, William Henry; and (left to right front row) Elsie Charlotte and Frank (Fairclough)
Fig. 4. An advertisement of the Tees Tug Co. Ltd., placed in the brochure "Ports of Middlesbrough and Stockholm Annual" in 1913. As the advertisement indicates, this was the time when the Watkins Petrie Company was absorbed
Fig. 5. Photo. Lingdale in the River Tees proceeding up river opposite Clarence Wharf, c.1915, shortly after her purchase by the Tees Tug. Co. Ltd.
Fig. 6. Photo. Athlete aground in the River Tees, c.1912 when in the ownership of the Robinson Tug Co. Ltd. Note the Robinson funnel markings (source: Thirlwell & Co. Ltd)
Fig. 7. Letterheads of some of the companies referred to in this history. That of the Florence Company was in use about 1908, that of the Duncan Company about 1922 and the Tees Towing heading is of the present day
Fig. 8. Photo. Athlete and George Robinson assisting the Berlin, which in 1920 was the largest vessel to have visited Middlesbrough Dock. Athlete, at this time, had not received her new Tees Towing funnel colours (Photo courtesy of B. V. Andrew)
Fig. 9. Photo. Coalapolis was, in 1923, the first tug in the Tees Towing fleet to be purchased new. Here she is seen on one of her first jobs towing the three-masted sailing vessel Garthneill to sea on the 10th April. Garthneill had been built in 1895 (source: W. Haig Parry)
Fig. 10. Photo. The excursion vessel Bilsdale fully loaded with holidaymakers from Scarborough, c.1930 (source H. Hudson)
Fig. 11. Photo. The crew of the Crosthwaite Steamship company's Bilsdale in 1925. They are, left to right:
Back row: Clinton Aydon; William Crosthwaite; W. Knowles; H. Butter; F. Ranson
Centre row: E. Carr; Mrs. Williams; Mrs Dunning
Front row: Captain Charles William Duncan; O. Fulton; W. Warren; G. Scarlet; F. Thompson; John Robinson. Source: R. C. Clifford
Fig. 12. Photo. Councillor William Henry Crosthwaite wearing his mayoral robes and chain of office when Mayor of Middlesbrough in 1925 (source: M. Wright)
Fig. 13. Photo. Mrs. Ada Mary Crosthwaite wearing her chain of office when Mayoress of Middlesbrough in 1925 (source: M. Wright)
Fig. 14. An advertisement placed by Charles Duncan and Sons Limited in a port handbook of 1926. Compare the claim of longevity with that in the Robinson and Crosthwaite advertisement in Fig. 19.
Fig. 15. An advertisement placed in the handbook "Middlesbrough, Pictorial and Industrial" in 1926 by the management partnership Robinson and Crosthwaite
Fig. 16. Photo of a lorry disguised as a tug making an excellent entry into the Middlesbrough Carnival procession in 1925. It is photographed in Exchange Place outside of the Tees Towing Company's office, the entrance to which is just behind the funnel of the tug. Middlesbrough railway station is in the background. Of the many people in the photograph, those identifiable are: George Robinson; Wallace Robinson; William Crosthwaite; John Adams; and John Robinson (in the centre of the gateway). (source: R. C. Clifford)
Fig. 17. Photo. A family group taken in 1925 to commemmorate the first mayoralty of Middlesbrough for Councillor William Crosthwaite. With him, from left to right are:
Back row: Cecil Crosthwaite (16); Captain George Elliott; Thomas Crosthwaite
Front row: Mrs Elliott; Dorothy Elliott Crosthwaite (14); The Mayoress; Mrs. Ada Crosthwaite; Alice Mary Crosthwaite (19); and Mrs. Jane Crosthwaite
Fig. 18. Photo. On board the Beattie Duncan during the General Strike in 1926 are, left to right:
On the bridge deck: William Chrystal Duncan; George Robinson; William Crosthwaite and Charles William Duncan
On the main deck: Wallace Robinson; Norman Thompson and George Mayhew (source: W. Haig Parry)
Fig. 19. Facsimile of an attractive advertisement of 1930 which appeared under the heading of the managing partnership Robinson and Crosthwaite. It is so full of information that it speaks for itself. The centre panel includes a drawing of H.M.S. Colossus in tow by the tugs "Kings Cross" and "Samphire Batts" from Devonport to Rosyth, in August 1928
Fig. 20. Photo of the Santa Maria being towed downstream from her builders Furness Shipbuilding Co. by the tugs Athlete, Dragon and Cleveland in 1928. Seen passing under the Middlesbrough Transporter Bridge (source: W. Haig Perry)
Fig. 21. Strikingly clear photo of the paddle tug Cleveland towing the Winterhude upstream to Corporation Quay, Stockton past the construction site of the partly-built Newport vertical lift bridge in June 1932. The damage to the top of the mainmast of the Winterhude was caused when she collided with the span of the Transporter Bridge on her way up river (source: Cleveland County Council)
Fig. 22. Photo of Captain J. C. (Charlie) Rounce at the wheel of Acklam Cross shortly after her delivery in 1933 (source: Northern Echo)
Fig. 23. Photo. Queens Cross and Hutton Cross (1) manoeuvring the Ellerman liner City of Glasgow into position to pass through the 80 feet wide exit channel from Middlesbrough Dock in 1933 (source: W. Haig Parry)
Fig. 24. Photo of Kings Cross (1) towing the Finnish four-masted Passat to sea from the River Tees c.1933. Note the radio aerials fitted to the tug and also to the sailing vessel (source: W. Haig Parry)
Fig. 25. Photo of Queens Cross, Athlete and Lingdale towing the disabled United States vessel West Hika into the River Tees in January 1936. She had stranded near Seaham Harbour and was subsequently broken up (Source: W. Haig Parry)
Fig. 26. The Coat of Arms of Sir William Crosthwaite. The motto "Tenax-Animo" translates as "steadfast"
Fig. 27. Photo of Captain Joe Harrison, the skipper of Kings Cross (1), pictured with two members of his crew: Alex Duncan (left) and Gordon Munchin (right) in June 1939 on their return from the salvage of the Ernrix. The two latter had been rescued from the sea when the Ernrix foundered (photo courtesy of The Evening Gazette, Cleveland)
Fig. 28. Photo of a family group taken on Christmas Day 1939, when Councillor Sir William Crosthwaite had been appointed Mayor of Middlesbrough for the second time. With him, in the garden of his home at Thornfield Road, Middlesbrough are from left to right:
Back row: Lawrence Richmond-Smith; Major Claude Fairweather; Captain Cecil Crosthwaite
Front row: Mrs. Dorothy Richmond-Smith and her son; Mrs. Alice Fairweather and her daughter and son; the Mayoress Lady Ada Crosthwaite and Mrs. Mahoney Crosthwaite with sons Richard and John (source: W. Haig Perry)
Fig. 29. Visit of their Majesties King George VI and Queen Elizabeth to Middlesbrough on the 19th August 1941. They are seen here in Albert Park, inspecting the local Civil Defence Services and accompanied by the Mayor and Mayoress of Middlesbrough, Councillor Sir Wiliam and Lady Crosthwaite
Fig. 30. Photo. Acklam Cross, NER No. 6 and Cleveland manoeuvring the first of the "Phoenix" concrete caissons out of William Gray's drydock at Graythorp in 1944. These units were towed South to form part of the "Mulberry" harbour built off the coast of Normandy following the landing of allied forces there in June 1944 (source: W. Haig Parry)
Fig. 31. Photo. A group of Tees Towing's tug crews gathered on board Charing Cross in March 1947. They are from left to right: Captain E. Watson Snr, retired 1953; Captain H. Scott, retired 1970; J. Lillie, died 1962; R. Sutherland, retired 1973; E. Watson Jnr, retired 1974; E. Silcox; R. Anderson, retired 1973; Captain J. Purvis, retired 1978; J. Jackson, died 1957; ? Hutchinson; T. Hood; ?; ?; ?; Captain R. Harrison, retired 1978; L. Scott Senior, retired 1974 and ? Chester
Fig. 32. An example of the floating docks built by Furness Shipbuilding Co., on this occasion, in 1948, being towed by the tugs Euston Cross, Charing Cross, Lingdale and Cleveland on the first leg of its journey to Sweden (source: W. Haig Parry)
Fig. 33. Dundas Cross, skipper J. W. (Micky) Spink taking the Harrison liner Trader out of Middlesbrough. (source: W. Haig Parry)
Fig. 34. Photo. Dundas Cross mooring the London Pride at the fitting-out quay after her launch at Furness Shipbuilding Co. on 30th June 1950. The crew were Micky Spink (skipper); J. Walton (fireman) and K. Townsend (source: W. Haig Parry)
Fig. 35. Photo. Banbury Cross (1) and Lingdale berthing the tanker British Drummer at the Teesport No. 1 Oil Berth (later named Queen Elizabeth II Jetty) on 2nd October 1950. She was the first vessel to unload a cargo there and the event marked the first step towards the huge traffic of oil-related cargoes which were new entering and leaving the River Tees (source: W. Haig Perry)
Fig. 36. Photo. Temple Cross and Banbury Cross (1) experiencing difficult conditions after the launch of Fragum from Smith's Dock, South Bank in a strong wind in November 1951 (source: W. Haig Perry)
Fig. 37. Photo. Banbury Cross (1) going to the assistance of the Gripfast off Runswick Bay, 22nd October 1951 (source: Yorkshire Evening Post)
Fig. 38. Photo. Cleveland Buildings, the headquarters of the Tees Towing Co. Ltd., Queens Square, Middlesbrough, originally the homes of Bolckow and Vaughan, July 1982 (source: Richard Crosthwaite)
Fig. 39. Photo. The Tees Towing Operations & Maintenance Centre at Tees Wharf. Due to be superseded by a new nearby building in 1984 (source: Richard Crosthwaite)
Fig. 40. Photo. A view of Tees Wharf showing the whole of the operations and maintenance buildings with part of the tug fleet alongside c.1962. (Mather's of Middlesbrough)
Fig. 41. Euston Cross and Banbury Cross (1) towing Suhail to sea from the Furness Shipbuilding Yard at Haverton Hill, April 1952 (source: W. Haig Parry)
Fig. 42. Portrait photo of Captain Ernie Watson Senior, aged 69, shortly before his retirement in September 1953 (courtesy of The Evening Gazette, Cleveland)
Fig 43. Photo. Sir William and Lady Crosthwaite on the occasion of their Golden Wedding on July 27, 1954 (courtesy of The Evening Gazette, Cleveland)
Fig. 44. Photo. Kings Cross (2) arriving at Youghal, Eire in 1954 with the sailing vessel Pequod during the making of the film "Moby Dick"
Fig. 45. Photo. The crew of Kings Cross (2) on their return to the Tees on 11th November 1954 from assisting in the filming of "Moby Dick". From left to right, they are: George Robinson, Edward Carr Junior, Robert Briggs, Captain Alex Duncan, M. McQuinlan, J. Ash and Jack Walton (courtesy of The Evening Gazette, Cleveland)
Fig. 46. Photo. The first geared-diesel tugs in the Tees Towing fleet. Caedmon Cross and Golden Cross towing President Kruger on trials from Furness Shipbuilding Yard, 12th September 1955
Fig. 47. Fiery Cross in dry dock (minus water!). The photo here shows the stern of the ship with a person standing behind the ship between the slipway rails. The details and size of the ship's Kort Rudder are plain to see (source: W. Ralston Ltd)
Fig. 48. Photo. Presentation of a bouquet to Mrs. Dorothy Richmond-Smith by a shipyard apprentice at the launch of Banbury Cross (2) at Dartmouth in 1958. Others in the family group are from left to right: Mrs. Alice Fairweather; Sir William Crosthwaite; Major Cecil Crosthwaite; Mrs. Mahoney Crosthwaite; Brigadier Claude Fairweather and Mr. Lawrence Richmond-Smith (Source: Nicholas Horne Ltd.)
Fig. 49. Photo. The diesel tug Hutton Cross (2) newly arrived from her builders, alongside Silver Cross at Tees Wharf on 24th March 1958. Silver Cross, the penultimate steam tug in the fleet, was about to depart to her new owners at Grimsby (courtesy of The Evening Gazette, Cleveland)
Fig. 50. Photo. A view underneath Hutton Cross whilst in dry dock in Glasgow showing the six-bladed Voith-Schneider propulsion unit. The surrounding protective baseplate and frames can also be seen
Fig. 51. Photo. Three models of Caedmon Cross, Fiery Cross and Hutton Cross. The models show respectively the progression from conventional screw and rudder, through Kort rudder to Voith-Schneider propulsion systems (source: A. T. Kelly & Co. Ltd)
Fig. 52. Photo of the complete Tees Towing fleet circa 1965. From left to right: Caedmon Cross, Ingleby Cross (2), Golden Cross, Banbury Cross (2), Hutton Cross (2), Danby Cross, Marton Cross, Fiery Cross and Erimus Cross
Fig. 53. Photo of the drilling platform Ocean Prince being held against the gale on the morning of 1st November 1965 after having broken loose from her moorings at Smith's Dock in the middle of the previous night and careered down river out of control. The whole Tees towing fleet was involved in the rescue but only Banbury Cross (2) and Danby Cross can be seen in this particular photograph (courtesy of The Evening Gazette, Cleveland)
Fig. 54. Composite advertisement showing Marton Cross the tug on the bottom of the poster and in the top panel His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales, Prince Charles in earnest conversation with Cecil Crosthwaite in the uniform of Lord Lieutenant of Cleveland. Second to the left of the cross in the top panel is Brigadier Claude Fairweather (source: Cleveland County Council/Richard Crossthwaite)
Fig. 55. Photo of the partly built drilling platform Staflo being towed back to the Furness Shipbuilding Co. basin after breaking loose from her berth in February 1967. She had drifted downsteam almost as far as the Transporter Bridge and was about to collide with ships berthed at Dent's and Tyne Tees' wharves. Prompt action by several of the Tees Towing tugs prevented this from happening. Seen here are Fiery Cross, Banbury Cross (2) and Danby Cross
Fig. 56. Startlingly clear photo of Ormesby Cross and Ayton Cross alongside Tees Wharf showing clearly the seahorse motif mounted on the bridge front and on the latter vessel, the company badge on the bow (source: C. E. Jackson)
Fig. 57. Photo. The platform party at the launch of Ormesby Cross at Hessle in 1967. Including from left to right: Mr. Richard Crosthwaite; Mrs. Judy Crosthwaite; Sir William Crosthwaite; Mrs. Alice Fairweather and Brigadier Claude Fairweather (source: Walter Fussey & Son)
Fig. 58. An informal group of four generations of the Crosthwaite family in 1968: Richard (33), Sir William (87), Cecil (59), and Adam Jonathan (9 months old). The photograph was taken shortly before the death of Sir William (source: Richard Crossthwaite)
Fig. 59. Photo of the complete Tees Towing fleet proceeding down river to the Sea Reach to scatter the ashes of Sir William and Lady Crossthwaite on the waters of the Tees, 23rd May 1968
Fig. 60. Portrait photo of Major Cecil Crosthwaite M. B. E., K. St. J., T. D., J. P. and son of Sir William Crosthwaite (source: Baron Studios)
Fig. 61. Photo of Fiery Cross demonstrating her fire fighting capabilities near the entrance to Tees Dock (source: Richard Crossthwaite)
Fig. 62. Photo. This view of Leven Cross hurrying upstream on the River Tees in 1982 shows her fire-fighting monitors mounted on a special platform high above her bridge (source: A. Sparrow)
Fig. 63. Portrait photo of Mr. Arthur Greenwell, FCIS, Commercial Director of Tees Towing Company Limited (source Studio Tristan)
Fig 64. Mrs. Judy Crossthwaite about to launch the Ralph Cross at Richards (Shipbuilders) Ltd., Yarmouth, in 1973 (source: Brian Ollington)
Fig. 65. Family photo in 1973 of three generations of the Crosthwaite family, from left to right, Mrs. Mahoney Crosthwaite; Mr. Richard Crosthwaite; Philippa Crosthwaite; Major Cecil Crosthwaite; Belinda Crosthwaite and Mrs. Judy Crossthwaite (source: Brian Ollington)
Fig. 66. Photo. The 11,000 ton flotation tank which had been used to carry the Graythorp 1 jacket structure to the BP Forties field is here being returned to the Tees in 1974 by four Tees Towing Tugs: Leven Cross, Ralph Cross, Ayton Cross and Fiery Cross
Fig. 67. Photo. The Royal Yacht Britannia arriving in the River Tees on the 14th July 1977 bringing Her Majesty the Queen and His Royal Highness The Duke of Edinburgh for their jubilee visit to Cleveland. In the Sea Reach, Greatham Cross is shaping to make fast at the head of the vessel (source: Richard Crossthwaite)
Fig. 68. Photo. Skelton Cross in Smith's drydock at South Bank, September 1976. This shows the underside of the boat and the twin Schottel rudder-propeller propulsion units as viewed from the bow of the tug
Fig. 69. Photo. H. M. Y. Britannia having arrived in Tees Dock is being berthed at the No. 2 Quay by Ralph Cross and Greatham Cross on 14th July 1977
Fig. 70. Photo. Major Cecil and Mrs. Mahoney Crosthwaite with Her Majesty the Queen and H.R.H The Duke of Edinburgh on their arrival in the Royal Yacht Britannia at Tees Dock for their Jubilee visit to Cleveland, 14th July 1977(courtesy of The Evening Gazette, Cleveland)
Fig. 71. Photo. The complete Tees Towing fleet proceeding down to the Sea Reach to scatter the ashes of Cecil Crosthwaite on the waters of the Tees, 3rd January 1979
Fig. 72. Portrait photo of Richard Crosthwaite, M.A., J.P., D. L., Chairman and Managing Director of Tees Towing Company Limited since 1979 (source: Studio Tristan)
Fig. 73. Photo. Yarm Cross shows her paces whilst on trials from Richard Dunston's shipyard at Hessle. This view illustrates the position of the towing hook near the stern in tractor tugs. The fine all-round visibility from the wheelhouse is also apparent (source: Walter Fussey & Son)
Fig. 74. Photo. Mural appearing on the rear wall of the Tees Towing headquarters. It shows the Union Jack with Lord Lieutenant's insignia), French tricolor (French consulate), the Middlesbrough Town Hall and Transporter Bridge as well as a number of tugs. It was painted by Michael Smith in 1979 when he ws a student at the Middlesbrough College of Art (source: Richard Crossthwaite)
Fig. 75. Photo.The vehicle carrier Pearl Ace berthing in Tees Dock with the assistance of two of the "Schottel" tugs Skelton Cross and Yarm Cross (source: A. Sparrow)
Fig. 76. Artist's impression of the new operations centre being built at Tees Wharf and due for completion during 1984 (source: Dennis Wompra)
Fig. 77. Photo. Coatham Cross ready for launching at Richard Dunston's shipyard at Hessle, 16th September 1981
Fig. 78. Photo. Norton Cross in the William Wright drydock at Hull, April 1984, before delivery by her builders Richard Dunston (Hessle) Ltd. to Tees Towing Co. Ltd. (source: A. Sparrow)

Tug Details and Histories (date range indicates when each tug entered and left the fleet, then builders & build date, method of propulsion and ultimate fate):
1. Florence, 1902-1927. Built 1879 by T. Williamson, Harrington. Paddle-driven, engines made 1859. Pictured on page 139 in Middlesbrough Dock Cut, c.1926. Sold for breaking 31.8.1927
2. Primrose, 1903-1914. Built in 1883 by J. Duthie, Sons & Co., Aberdeen. Screw propulsion. Sold for breaking 31.12.1914
3. Charles Dickens, 1904. Built in 1872 by Readhead, Softley & Co., South Shields. Paddle propulsion. Broken up on Tyne in 1915
4. Challenger, 1905-1907. Built in 1881 by J. T. Eltringham & Co., South Shields. Paddle propulsion. Sold for breaking up on 7.8.1929
5. Clarissa, 1907-1930. Built in 1883 by Richard Clark, Weston Point for J. Dutton, Cardiff. Screw propulsion. Sold for breaking up on 25.8.1930. Pictured opposite Clarence Wharf, c.1928 (source: W. Haig Perry)
6. Empress of India, 1907-1913. Built in 1898 by Carmichael MacLean & Co., Greenock for J. Constant, London. Screw propulsion. Foundered in the Persian Gulf 19.3.1915
7. Glen Rosa, 1909-1926. Built in July 1895 by J. Shearer & Son, Glasgow for Guthrie, Heywood & Co., Cardiff. Screw propulsion. Sailed to Blyth on 30.4.1926 for breaking
8. Hero, 1909-1917. Built in June 1892 by Edwards & Symes, Millwall for Burry Steam Tug Co., Llanelly. Screw propulsion. Sunk by a mine off Sunderland on 28.3.1917
9. Vixen/Archdale, 1909-1919. Built by Allsup & Co., Ltd, Preston for T.W. Fox, Plymouth, as Vixen in 1896. Screw propulsion. 1937 - sold for breaking up
10. Champion, 1909-1920. Built by J. T. Eltringham, South Shields (YN 57) for S. Oates, Grimsby in 1876. Paddle propulsion. Sold for breaking up in 1929
11. Challenger (2), 1909-1925. Built by J. Readhead & Co., South Shields (YN 97) for T. W. Elliott, London in 1873. Paddle propulsion. Sold for breaking up on 21.4.1925
12. Liberia, 1913-1930. Built by Cochrane & Sons, Selby (YN 354) for W. Watkins, London in October 1905. Screw propulsion. Broken up in 1937. Pictured off Clarence Wharf in c.1928 (source: W. Haig Perry)
13. Triumph, 1913-1923. Built in 1875 by G. Butchard, Milton Ironworks, Gravesend for J. Williams, Gravesend. Paddle propulsion. Broken up on 31.3.1926
14. Ida Duncan, 1914-1917, built in 1891 by J. P. Rennoldson & Sons, South Shields for Steam Trawling Co., Boston as Sturgeon. Screw propulsion. Sunk by mine off entrance to River Tees with the loss of six lives on 31.1.1917
15. Lingdale, 1914-1954. Built in October 1882 by Westwood Baillie & Co., Poplar for Dover Harbour Board as Lady Vita. Paddle propulsion. Sold to J. J. King & Co., Gateshead on May 5, 1954 for breaking. Pictured around 1928 (source: W. Haig Parry)
16. Frank, 1915-1921, built in December 1896 by R. Craggs & Sons, Middlesbrough for J. Constant, London as Looker. Screw propulsion. In 1921, it was sold to W. J. Guy, Cardiff
17. Dora Duncan, 1915-1927, built in 1891 by J. T. Eltringham & Co., South Shields for J. S. Doeg, North Shields as Lionel. Screw propulsion. On 10th February, 1927, it was broken up at Stockton-on-Tees
18. Adonis, 1917 - ?. Built in 1875 by Wouldhave & Johnson, North Shields for W. Stephenson, North Shields. Paddle propulsion. Purchased by Charles Duncan & Sons Ltd. for £100 on 5th February, 1917. Subsequent history not known
19. Fifeshire, 1917-1919. Built in 1887 by J. T. Eltringham & Co., South Shields for Clyde Shipping Co. as Flying Swallow. Paddle propulsion. Broken up in 1924. Fifeshire is pictured as Flying Swallow at Kirkcaldy in 1905
20. Monsdale, 1917-1923. Built in 1875 by G. Butchard, Milton, near Gravesend as Marie. Paddle propulsion. Sold in 1923 to Pounder for £100 for breaking up
21. Privateer, 1917. Built in 1883 by T. W. Toward, Newcastle-upon-Tyne for W. P. Ching, Swansea. Paddle propulsion. 23rd December 1818 saw the vessel as a total loss. Ashore Equitien, near Boulogne on voyage Le Tréport to Boulogne. Picture shows Privateer at Bideford when employed as an excursion vessel (source: North Devon Museum Trust)
22. Lily or Lily Duncan, 1918-1927. Built in 1866 by Bewley & Webb, Dublin for J. Newton, Liverpool as Herring. Screw propulsion. Sold for breaking-up on July 2, 1927 at Stockton-on-Tees
23. Betsy Duncan, 1918-1920. Built in 1889 by W. Cook, Middlesbrough for A. Brown Ltd as Comet. Screw propulsion. Sank in South Dock, Sunderland on March 27, 1922
24. Powerful, 1920-1923. Built in 1878 by J. T. Eltringham & Co., South Shields for Clyde Shipping Co. Ltd. as Flying Huntress. Paddle propulsion. Sold for £180 for breaking up on July 24, 1923. Pictured in a photo on the River Clyde (source: G. E. Langmuir)
25. Athlete, 1920-1947. Built in April 1893 by J. Stewart & Sons Ltd., Blackwall for Matthew Brownfield, Poplar. Screw propulsion. In 1955, the vessel was sold to T. W. Ward Ltd, Preston for breaking up. Pictured on the River Tees in 1921
26. Cleveland, 1920-1947. Built in 1881 by J. T. Eltringham & Co., South Shield for The North Eastern Railway Co. (W. Bulmer, Manager). Paddle propulsion. Broken-up at Stockton-on-Tees on May 6, 1947. Pictured in Middlesbrough Dock during the First World War with the Robinson Tug Co., funnel markings (source: R. C. Clifford)
27. George Peabody, 1920. Built in December 1867 by Readhead, Softley & Co., South Shields for J. Martin, Gravesend. Paddle propulsion. Broken up on 8th October 1920
28. George Robinson, 1920-1950. Built in February 1896 by Earles Shipbuilding & Engineering Co. Ltd., Hull (YN 404) for Bristol Screw Towage Co., as Kestrel. Screw propulsion. Sold on May 23, 1950 to Clayton and Davie Ltd, Dunston for breaking up. George Robinson is pictured in the River Tees circa 1928 (W. Haig Perry)
29. Nunthorpe, 1920-1926; built in 1876 by J. T. Eltringham, South Shields (YN 55) for the North Eastern Railway Co. (W. Bulmer Mgr), paddle propulsion. Sold to Hughes Bolckow Shipbreaking Co. Ltd. for breaking-up at Blyth on March 24, 1926. Pictured in Middlesbrough Dock Cut, c.1926
30. Pendennis, 1920-1923. Built in 1863 by J. Ash & Co., Cubitt Town, London for R. Taylor, Falmouth, paddle propulsion. Vessel broken up on July 24, 1923
31. Samphire Batts, 1920-1933. Built in 1893 by Cumming & Ellis, Inverkeithing (Y.N. 6) for Mackay & Co., Leith as Sea King. Screw propulsion. Sold to Clayton & Davie Ltd., Dunston on Oct 17, 1933 for breaking up
32. Borwick Rails/Ironopolis. Built in 1871 by Liverpool Shipbuilding Co., Ltd, Liverpool for Nathaniel Cane, Liverpool as Borwick Rails. Paddle propulsion. Sold on August 3, 1927 to Thomas & McGregor for £375 for breaking-up at Bo'ness
33. Lord Warden, 1920-1924. Built in 1868 by Readhead, Softley & Co., South Shields for J. Martin, Gravesend. Paddle propulsion. Sold for breaking-up on Jan 16, 1924
34. Granite City, 1921-1922. Built by Wouldhave & Johnson, North Shields for J. N. Newton, Aberdeen. Paddle propulsion. On August 13th, 1927, the ship foundered at Blaydon Buoys, River Tyne. Pictured at Aberdeen, c. 1915
35. United, 1921-1923. Builders and build date unknown. Sold to C. W. Robinson, Middlesbrough in February, 1921. Sold for breaking-up for £80 in November, 1923
36. William Findley, 1921-1922. Built in 1884 by Wouldhave & Johnson, North Shields, for W. Osten Jr., North Shields. Paddle propulsion. March, 1922 - vessel lost - details unknown
37. Laceby, 1922-1926. Built in 1892 by J. C. Tecklenborg, Geestemunde for C. Kampf, Geestemunde as Toni. Screw propulsion. Captured by British forces in 1916. Sold to Hughes Bolckow, Blyth for breaking-up on March 29, 1926
38. Electric Arc, 1922-1925. Built by McLaren Brothers Ltd., Dumbarton for themselves and Mavor & Coulson Ltd., Glasgow. Requisitioned by the Admiralty for duties at Rosyth in 1916. Screw propulsion. Sold to J. Milburn, St. Helier, Jersey and renamed Olive in July 1925. No further details are known of the boat after 1932. Pictured in a drawing that was made at the time of her construction, 1911. Source: "The Shipbuilder".
39. William Fallows, 1923. Built by Hepple & Co., North Shields for the Tees Conservancy Commission in 1888. Paddle propulsion. Broken up in 1935
40. Coalopolis, 1923-1925. Built in March, 1923 by A. Hall & Co., Ltd., Aberdeen (YN 578) for Tees Towing Company, Ltd. (Robinson & Crossthwaite Mgrs.). Screw propulsion. Broken up in Hamilton, Ontario in 1971 (was renamed Bansurf in 1936 and Shawanaga in 1948). Pictured in 1923
41. C. M. Palmer, 1923-1925. Built in November, 1884 by H. S. Edwards & Sons, Howden for the Mayor, Alderman and Burgesses of Jarrow. Sold on August 18, 1925 for breaking-up at £105
42. Beattie Duncan, 1923-1928. Built in 1893 by J. T. Eltringham & Co., South Shields (YN 170) for Baird & Barnsley, North Shields as Triumph. Paddle propulsion. Broken up around 1934. Pictured as 'Presto' which was its name in 1894 (source: World Ship Photo Library)
43. Vigilant, 1924-1928. Built in 1906 by Jonker & Stans, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Holland. Screw propulsion. Sold to Canada on March 1, 1928. Pictured as deck-cargo en route to Canada on the "Aycliffe Hall" in 1938. Source: Smith's Dock, Co. Ltd.
44. Hurworth/Hutton Cross (1), 1925-1934. Built in 1897 by J. T. Eltringham & Co., South Shields (YN 188) for T. G. Sandford, Gravesend as Conqueror. Paddle propulsion. Sold to Clayton & Davie Ltd., Dunston for breaking up in August 1934. Pictured off Clarence Wharf, c.1928 (source: W. Haig Perry)
45. Bilsdale, 1925-1935. Built in 1900 by Allsup & Co. Ltd., Preston for Great Yarmouth Steam Tug Co. Ltd. (G. W. Owen, Mgr.) as Lord Roberts. Paddle propulsion. Sold on May 7, 1935 to Clayton & Davie, Dunston for breaking-up. Pictured in c.1927
46. Ingleby Cross (1), 1927-1933. Built in December 1912 by J. T. Eltringham & Co., South Shields (YN 291) for the Great Western Railway Co. as Pen Cw. Paddle propulsion. Delivered to J. A. White & Co., St. Davids-on-Forth for breaking-up in December 1962
47. Kings Cross (1), 1928-1948, built in 1918 by Gebroeders Jonker, Kinderdijk, Holland (YN 405) for Bureau Wijsmuller, Ijmuiden as Gelderland. Screw propulsion. Found to have dropped out of the Lloyds Shipping Register in 1956. Fate unknown. Pictured on the River Tees in 1934 (source: W. Haig Perry)
48. Glenthorpe, 1930. built in 1892 by J. P. Rennoldson & Sons, South Shields for Clyde Shipping Company Ltd. (J. Cuthbert Mgr) as Flying Mist. Paddle propulsion. Sold on May 26, 1930 for breaking-up
49. Graythorpe, 1930-1934. Built in 1881 by L. Tilkin & Co., Liege for the Societe Anonyme de Remorquage Helice, Antwerp as Samson. Screw propulsion. Sold for breaking-upon August 24, 1934
50. Troon, 1930-1934. Built in 1902 by J. P. Rennoldson & Sons, South Shields (YN 220) for the Glasgow and South Western Railway Co. Ltd. Paddle propulsion. Broken-up at Tranmere in 1948
51. Steelopolis, 1930-1934. Built in May 1896 by A. W. Robertson & Co., Canning Town, London for Johnston Line Ltd. (Furness Withy & Co. Ltd., Mgrs) as Amore. Screw propulsion. Broken-up on June 21, 1949
52. Queens Cross, 1933-1948. Built in 1921 by N. V. Schps. Nimmerzust Lekkerkerk (YN 83) for N.V. Bureau Wijsmuller Maatschappij as Vlaanderen. Screw propulsion. Fate unknown. Pictured on the River Tees in 1934 (source: W. Haig Perry)
53. Acklam Cross, 1933-1964, built in August 1933 by Hall Russell & Co., Ltd., Aberdeen (YN 728) for Tees Towing Co. Ltd. (Robinson & Crosthwaite, Mgrs). Screw propulsion. Broke adrift on February 18, 1969 and vanished at 32.20 N, 18.31 E whilst being towed by 'Maltese Terrier' from Valetta to Zueitina, Libya. Pictured with Captain Charlie Rounce at the wheel in 1934 (source: W. Haig Parry)
54. Charing Cross, 1934-1957, built in March 1913 by J. P. Rennoldson & Sons, South Shields (YN 282) for Tees Conservancy Commissioners as Joseph Constantine. Screw propulsion. Delivered in January 1960 to J. J. King & Co. Ltd., Gateshead for breaking-up. Pictured in the River Tees in 1934 (source: W. Haig Perry)
55. Euston Cross, 1938-1960. Built by J. I. Thorneycroft & Co., Ltd, Southampton (YN 1039) in November 1924 for Union Government of South Africa (Railways & Harbours Administration, Port Elizabeth) as Sir William Macintosh. Screw propulsion. Broken up in 1981. Pictured after structural alterations in 1951 (source: W. Haig Perry)
56. Lady Howard Stepney, 1942-1948. Built by Cox & Co., Falmouth for Dundalk Pilotage Service as The Liberator in 1906. Twin screw propulsion. On May 1950 the registry on this vessel was closed due to it being permanently moored without propulsion in the River Tees, when it was converted into a club house. Ultimate fate unknown. Pictured at Lady Eveline when a Port Talbot pilot cutter (source: P. N. Thomas)
57. Flying Fish, 1947-1951. Built in 1882 by J. T. Eltringham & Co., South Shields (YN 100) for J. Siddell, Sunderland. Paddle propulsion. Registry closed on January 22, 1951 with the vessel broken-up at J. J. King & Co., Ltd., Gateshead. Pictured on an outward bound excursion trip from Whitby (source: Langbaurgh Borough)
58. Dundas Cross, 1947-1958. Built in August 1943 by J. S. Watson (Gainsborough) Ltd., Gainsborough (YN 1534) for the Ministry of War Transport (Redhead & Drys Tugs Ltd., Mgrs.) as Empire Mustang. Broken up in c.1976. Pictured after structural alterations in 1952 (source: W. Haig Perry)
59. Marple, 1947. Completed by Earle's Co., Ltd., Hull (YN 313) for The Manchester, Sheffield & Lincolnshire Railway in October 1888. Twin Screw propulsion. Sold on May 1, 1947 to Clayton & Davie Ltd., Dunston for breaking-up for £160. Pictured (from "Humber Shipping" - A Dalesman Publication.)
60. Silver Cross, 1947-1958. Built in June, 1910 by J. T. Eltringham & Co., South Shields (YN 275) for The Great Central Railway as Central No. 1. Arrived on June 6 1964 at Inverkeithingin tow of tug 'Workman' for breaking up by Thomas W. Ward Ltd. Pictured passing Clarence Wharf with Captain T. Hood at the wheel, c.1948 (source: W. Haig Perry)
61. Temple Cross, 1947-1962. Built in March 1912 by J. T. Eltringham & Co., South Shields (YN 287) for The Great Central Railway as Central No. 2. Sold for breaking up on April 25, 1962 at Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Rotterdam. Pictured off Clarence Wharf in the competent hands of Captain J. Purvis, c.1948 (source: W. Haig Perry)
62. Kings Cross (2), 1948-1957, built in 1921 by Danziger Werft, Danzig (YN 28) for G. Edgeley, Gravesend as New Storm Cock. Sold on March 1, 1957 to C. W. Dorkin & Co., Gateshead for breaking-up. Pictured in 1948 (source: W. Haig Perry)
63. Banbury Cross (1), 1950-1955. Built in December 1945 by Scott & Sons, Bowling (YN 375) for the Ministry of War Transport as Empire Nan. Was still in service at the time that this book was published. Pictured in 1950 (source: W. Haig Perry)
64. Caedmon Cross, 1953-1966. Built by Scott & Sons, Bowling (YN 400) for Tees Towing Co. Ltd. (William Crosthwaite & Son, Mgrs) in November 1953. Was still in service at the time that this book was published. Pictured on trials in 1953
65. Golden Cross, 1955-1968. Built in July 1955 by Scott & Sons, Bowling (YN 407) for Tees Towing Co. Ltd. (Wm Crosthwaite & Son., Mgrs.). Was still in service at the time that this book was published. Pictured on trials in 1955. (source: A. T. Kelly & Co. Ltd)
66. Ingleby Cross (2) 1955-1968. Built in October 1955 by Scott & Sons, Bowling (YN 408) for Tees Towing Co. Ltd. (Wm Crossthwaite & Son., Mgrs.). Was still in service at the time that this book was published. Pictured on trials in 1955. (source: A. T. Kelly & Co. Ltd)
67. Fiery Cross, 1957-1981. Built on May 19, 1957 by Scott & Sons, Bowling (YN 414) for Tees Towing Co. Ltd. (William Crosthwaite & Son., Mgrs). Was still in service at the time that this book was published. Pictured passing Smith's dock, outward bound, in 1958. In this photo, it's shown as built with original shape of funnel
68. Hutton Cross (2), 1958-1970. Built on March 24, 1958 by Scott & Sons., Bowling (YN 417) for Tees Towing Co. Ltd. (William Crosthwaite & Son., Mgrs). Propelled by a single Voith-Schneider propeller. Broken up in 1983 by Van Heyghen, Ghent. Pictured running stern first on arrival at the Tees Wharf from Bowling, 1958
69. Banbury Cross (2), 1958-1971. Completed on May 19, 1958 by Philip & Son. Ltd., Dartmouth (YN 1294) for Tees Towing Co. Ltd. (William Crosthwaite & Son., Mgrs). Propelled by a single Voith-Schneider propeller. In 1982 it was still in service, but subsequent history was not known. Pictured on trials in 1958 (source: N. Horne Ltd.)
70. Erimus Cross (1960-1976), built on February 5, 1960 by Scott & Sons (Bowling) Ltd., Bowling (YN 423) for Tees Towing Co. Ltd. (William Crosthwaite & Son., Mgrs). Sold on May 3, 1976 to Howard Doris Ltd. (R. F. Withey, Mgr.), renamed Mairi of Kishorn
71. Danby Cross, 1961-1975, having been completed on August 4, 1961 by J. Pollock, Sons & Co. Ltd., Faversham (YN 2123) for Tees Towing Co. Ltd. (William Crosthwaite & Son., Mgrs). Was still in service at the time that this book was published. Pictured, but photo location and source unknown
72. Marton Cross, 1963-1981, built on April 25, 1963 by R. Dunston (Hessle) Ltd., Hessle (YN S.794) for Tees Towing Co. Ltd. (William Crosthwaite & Son., Mgrs.). Was still in service at the time that this book was published. Pictured, but photo location and source unknown
73. Ayton Cross, 1967- , built on June 9, 1967 by R. Dunston (Hessle) Ltd., Hessle (YN S.844) for Tees Towing Co. Ltd. (William Crosthwaite & Son., Mgrs.). Still in the Tees Towing fleet on December 31, 1983. Pictured on trials in 1967 (source: Walter Fussey & Son)
74. Ormesby Cross, 1967-, built by R. Dunston (Hessle) Ltd., Hessle (YN S.845) for Tees Towing Co. Ltd. (William Crosthwaite & Son., Mgrs.). Still in the Tees Towing fleet on December 31, 1983. Pictured in 1983, but photo location unknown (source: Richard Crosthwaite)
75. Leven Cross, 1971-, built on May 24, 1971 by Fairmile Construction Co., Ltd., Berwick-upon-Tweed (YN 662) for Tees Towing Co. Ltd.). Still in the Tees Towing fleet on December 31, 1983. Pictured in 1971, but photo location and source unknown
76. Ralph Cross, 1974-, built on Feb 22, 1974 by Richards (Shipbuilders) Ltd., Yarmouth (YN 515) for Tees Towing Co., Ltd. Still in the Tees Towing fleet as of Dec 31, 1983. Pictured entering Tees Dock (source: J. K. Byass)
77. Greatham Cross, 1976-, built on March 16 by Scott & Sons (Bowling) Ltd., Bowling (YN 452) for Tees Towing Co. Ltd. Twin rudder propellers. Still in the Tees Towing fleet as of Dec 31, 1983. Pictured on trials in 1976 (source: W. Ralston Ltd.)
78. Skelton Cross, 1976-, built on June 22, 1976 by Scott & Sons (Bowling) Ltd., Bowling (YN 453) for Tees Towing Co. Ltd. Twin rudder propellers. Still in the Tees Towing fleet as of Dec 31, 1983. Pictured leaving Middlesbrough Dock Cut in 1976 (source: Richard Crosthwaite)
79. Yarm Cross, 1979-, built in August 1979 by R. Dunston (Hessle) Ltd., Hessle (YN 920) for Tees Towing Co. Ltd. Twin rudder propellers. Still in the Tees Towing fleet as of Dec 31, 1983. Pictured entering the water at Hessle, 1979 (source: Walter Fussey & Son)
80. Coatham Cross, 1981-, built in November 1981 by R. Dunston (Hessle) Ltd. (YN H.931) for the Tees Towing Co. Ltd. Twin rudder propellers. Still in the Tees Towing fleet as of Dec 31, 1983. Pictured on trials in 1981 (source: Walter Fussey & Son)
81. Norton Cross was at the time this book was published being built at R. Dunston (Hessle) Ltd., Hessle (YN 941) for Tees Towing Co. Ltd. for delivery in 1984. Twin rudder propellers. Pictured having her superstructure lowered into place whilst building at Hessle (source: Walter Fussey & Son)



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Ward-Jackson, C. H. 'Ships and Shipbuilders of a Westcountry Seaport. Fowey 1786-1939', first published in 1986 in Great Britain by Twelveheads Press, in paperback, 124pp, ISBN 0906294118. Sorry, out of stock, but click image to access prebuilt search for this title on Amazon UK
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About this book/synopsis: C. H. Ward-Jackson's detailed history of the shipping of the Port of Fowey from the Act of General Registry of 1786 to the present day is a very welcome and valuable addition to the body of histories written on ports in Britain and came about because the author lives there and was raising money for a worthy village cause from a modest maritime exhibition about Fowey, using ship portraits, models and nautical relics borrowed from local seafaring families. With the author's appetite for maritime historical research whetted, he undertook to transcribe for the National Maritime Museum the Port of Fowey's Ship Registers, all extant from 1786 and, at that time, kept in the Custom House at Fowey. These proved to be not just a list of ships, but a record of data on the families living in the port and their occupations and fortunes, deaths, wills, borrowings and bankruptcies. They also provided unrivalled material documenting the decline of ship-ownership over a century-and-a-half despite robust attempts to stave it off. A study of Fowey, the author realised, could be an indication of what was happening in other West Country ports generally.

The book makes a major contribution to the maritime history of South Western Britain and is a work of outstanding quality in its field. Using the long-neglected Statutory Registration material of the port in the the way pioneered in the West Country by the late Grahame Farr and by Rupert Jarvis, Ward-Jackson gives the reader a detailed picture of the ups and downs in the shipping history of Fowey over exactly two centuries in a way that could not be done excelpt through a thorough understanding of the significance and potential of this very comprehensive primary source material. It is indeed appropriate that this book is being published in 1986 on the occasion of the 200th anniversary of the coming into law of the new comprehensive system of ship registry - the law which made statutory the recording of the information upon which a port history of this kind can be based

Contents:
Foreword; Preface
Chapter One: Sloops and Cutters for 'Free Traders', 1786-1815
Chapter Two: Longer Voyages, Heavier Cargoes, Stronger Ships 1816-1840
Chapter Three: The Schooners and their Builders, 1841-1880
Chapter Four: Steamboats, Fishing Boats, U-Boats, 1881-1920
Chapter Five: Merchant Sail's Successors - Motor Ships and Yachts
Appendices:
A. Number of Ships on the Fowey Register (as of Dec 31)
B. Kinds and Sizes of Ships Registered at Fowey from 1786-1939
C. Fate of Ships Registered at Fowey from 1786-1939
D. Ports of Build of Ships Registered at Fowey
E. Merchant Ships of Known Builder, Built and Reg'd at Fowey
F. Port of Fowey Builders' Ships Reg'd 1786-1939
G: 'Plantation-Built' Vessels Reg'd at Fowey
H. Masters and Crews of Vessels Reg'd

Illustrations (all in black & white)
Frontispiece: 'Schooner Emily Ellen of Fowey, Peter Tadd master, off Cape St Sabastian February 17, 1873'
2. Photograph of Reuben Chappell (1870-1940) of Par
3. Photograph , full page, a band of Par stalwarts in 1905 (thereabouts): Edward Stephens, Sidney Vero Morcom, Inkerman Tregaskes, Roseveare, T. F. Pearce, Alfred Robins, Richard Beckerleg Tregaskes, Noel Purcell, Captain Samuel Tregaskes
4. Map of the Port of Fowey from February 17, 1841 showing its bounds and limits
5. Five drawings of Rigs of the Period, c.1800 from Falconer's 1815 Marine Dictionary showing what these ships look like: a) Cutter; b) Sloop; c) Brigantine; d) Lugger; e) Schooner
6. Scale diagram showing the sheer draught of 'Ferrett of Fowey Smugler'; built at Plymouth and seized for smuggling
7. Model of a Fowey revenue cutter bought in Fowey in 1935. Typical of the period c.1800
8. Image of Captain James Dunn of Mevagissey, master mariner
9. Diagram of a smuggling boats with tubs slung for sinking. The sinking stones were always bent on, and kept on deck till just before slipping
10a & b - Outline drawing of a method of securing tubs and stones for sinking and a crop sunk
11a & b - Outline drawing of a method of slinging tubs and the mode of carrying tubs
12. Map from 'Smuggling Days & Smuggling Ways', from 1892 by Commander the Honorable Henry N. Shore RN
13. Graph of the Fowey/Guernsey Trade Seizures for Smuggling and Transfer of vessels to Guernsey 1786-1823
14. Drawing of Polperro
15. Photo of the coastguard watch-house at Polruan, c.1860
16. Drawing of a coastguard sentry, 1831
p24 - Table of Cutters & Sloops built and registered in the Port of Fowey 1796-1836
17. Amazingly clear black & white photograph of Charlestown about 1904 showing the entrance to the basin cut from solid rock more than a century previously
18. Photograph of the 84ft beacon erected on the Gribben headland in 1832 by the Corporation of Trinity House of Deptford Strond which served as a leading mark to Fowey Harbour
19. Two pages from the account book of sloop Sally of 1808 kept by the owner John Climo
20. Black & white steel engraving after Thomas Allom (from Cornwall Illustrated 1831) showing Caffa Mill Pill in the distance where the shipyards were occupied successively by Nickels, Brokenshaw, Heller and others
21. Photograph of Looe in about 1900 showing three schooners alongside Downgate Quay, East Looe and the stores of Blamey & Morcom, Liskeard merchants
22. Photograph of the Honorable Henry N. Shore RN, who was appointed Inspecting Officer of H.M. Coastguard serving in England and Scotland
23. Image of the profits summary of the E. S. Hocken (1880-1911), which was the largest boat in the Port of Fowey, at 296 tons and 126 feet long
24. Iage of the list of the initial shareholders in the Ocean Ranger of 1875, which had been built at Appledore. She was 281 tons and the Hocken family's second largest barquentine
25. Image of a medical note written in the account book of schooner Rachael Anne of 1841 about a remedy for cholera
26.Illustration of the 256 ton barquentine Ada Peard built for Nathaniel Hocken at Par by Samuel Moss in 1875
26. Image of a receipt for Lostwithiel anchorage and harbourage dues issued to William Roberts (master of the schooner Louisa), dated November 27 1868
28. Advertisement from the West Briton, June 14 1850, announcing the intended departure from Fowey of emigrant barque Good Intent with John Warburton as master
29. Illustration of emigrant ships leaving the Cattewater, Plymouth - painting by John Warburton (master)
30. Illustration of The Rippling Wave, Captain Thomas Roberts, launched from Butson's Yard, March 27 1869, the first vessel to take out china clay loaded in Fowey harbour
31. Tiers of sailing vessels laying off the jetties at Fowey Harbour awaiting their turn to be loaded with china clay, which was in casks and horse drawn by railway truck-load to each jetty head
32. Post Office Telegraph in 1895 to Captain William Roberts at Fowey requesting news of the schooner Betsy Nicol
33. Photo of Mevagissey's inner harbour in the 1920s with the schooner Snow Flake (built1880) of Runcorn tied up at the quay
34. Accounts from the 48 foot sloop Fancy, July 9 - August 5, 1847
35. List of the ports of call at which disbursements were made by sloop Fancy on July 14, 1862 to April 6, 1863
36. Photograph of Par harbour built by Joseph Thomas Austen. Seen in port is the tug Treffry (iron-built in 1870) with various other vessels
37. Photograph of Treffry towing a schooner, thought to be the Dashwood, through the mouth of Par Harbour in 1897
38. Photo of three barquentines, probably Hocken's, at anchor in Fowey Harbour c. 1885, with the tug Countess of Jersey in attendance
39. Photo of the tug Gallant, iron-built at Rye in 1884 in service at Fowey for seventy years until sold in 1954
40. Photo of a contemporary model of the 83 ton Brenton, built by Nicholas Lelean at Mevagissey in 1861 and owned by Richard Harris Williams, a St. Austell mining engineer
41. Photo of the 90 ton Little Beauty, owned by John Stephens from Polruan
42. Indenture of June 24, 1860 binding Thomas Ferris (b1848) apprentice to William Luke, shipbuilder and caulker of Charlestown, signed by his father Peter Ferris (1826-1911)
43. Illustration of the 124-ton Lizzie Trenberth built by Samuel Moss at Par 1867
44. Photograph of a vessel in frame at Butson's yard, Bodinnick about 1870
45. Photograph of the entrance to Caffa Mill Pill, Fowey in about 1890, with Butson's Yard on the far bank and at right, Heller's yard
46. Illustration of the schooner Thetis built by Butson 1873 for various local owners including Luke of Charlestown and T.H. Knight of Lostwithiel
47. Illustration of one of the best-known schooners in the china clay trade, the 163-ton Alert, which was built in 1885 by Brudrit of Runcorn and was transferred to Fowey from Beaumaris in 1899 when Joseph Waters of Truro was her manager
48. Photo of the men of the shipbuilding yard of J. Slade & Sons, Polruan in about 1897. The two bearded men at the centre of the middle row are Samuel and John, sons of Christopher and Symons Slade with their nephew Joseph at the extreme right. At bottom right is Benjamin Moss Tregaskes on a visit from his yard at Par
49. Illustration of the Jane Slade, as pictured for her master Thomas Slade by Luigi Renault at Leghorn in 1887
50. Photograph of pilot, fisherman, methodist and life-saver Moses Dunn (1839-1920) aboard his yawl Misfit about 1910 off Polruan with Newquay wet dock in the distance on the left
51. Photo of Deerhound, 443 tons, built at Millwall in 1882, the second of six steamships, managed by Toyne, Carter & Co. of Fowey and acquired between 1897 and 1902
52. Illustration of Charles Phillips Couch (1886-1968), Pentewan shipbroker. His father and grandfather managed various vessels in Fowey such as the Mary Miller, Polly & Emily and Conoid
53. Profits summary of the Ocean Spray 1877-1901 from her account book
54. Photo of Fowey harbour July 1901 with the five-mast schooner Rebecca Palmer, 2556 tons and 260 feet long, on the left Astern is the Ernot Alfred of Riga
55. Photo of the fast-sailing little Isabella, 61 tons, built by Gibbs at Galmpton, Dartmouth, 1864
56. Photo of Pentewan tidal basin about 1900, built about 1825 with some 300 yards of quayage as a point of shipment alternative to Charlestown
57, 58, Two photos of Mevagissey from the early 1900s, which had twice the population of Fowey in the 18th Century
59. Photo of a traverse board incised on the bellows of the fishing vessel Maggie. A traverse board was an ancient and approximate means of recording the courses run during a watch
60. Illustration of the Martha Edmonds at sea - she was built as a brig at Milford in Pembroke in 1873 and was transferred from Llanelly to Fowey five years later on being bought by James Clunes, a Par merchant, and Edward Rilston, Fowey grocer and draper
61. Photograph of the Katie Cluett, second of four vessels built by John Stephens in Whitford's Yard, Fowey, 1874-1878
62. Illustration of the brigantine Adelaide, S. Bate master, A.E. Benney owner, painted by Chappell before she was altered to a schooner in 1917. She was built in Padstow in 1869 for the Fowey merchants Albertus and William Warren Dingle
63. Photograph of the ketch Rival, the last merchantman under sail to be built (1889) in Fowey
64. Photograph of the US schooner A.B. Sherman at Pensacola in c.1916 under her original colours. She was working in the coal and timber trade until acquired at Fowey
65. Photo of the A.B. Sherman after re-building to a four-master in 1920-1921 by Slade's. She was registered at Fowey on October 13, 1921
66. Illustration of The Earl Cairns built at Connah's Quay, Flint, 1883, bought by Toyne, Carter & Co., 1917
67. Photo of the deck of Waterwitch, looking forward in the Channel, Fowey-Newcastle, April 1930
68. Photo of Waterwitch looking towards the bow and along the left hand side of the ship - it captures her getting ready for her journey to new owners in the Gulf of Finland in spring 1939
69. Two oil paintings by Arthur Bradbury ARWA of the Barquentine Waterwitch
70. Two illustrations of Waterwitch on deck looking after (a) starboard side, 1931, Liverpool; (b) port side, 1930
71. Waterwitch, April 1930 showing (a) the forecastle and (b) the cabin
72. Photo of the auxiliary motor schooner Rigdin, 397 tons, launched in Finland in 1907 as Ingrid and bought by Edward Stephens in 1929 after he had lost the Lydia Cardell
73. Illustration of the Helena Anna, which was built at Pekela in Holland in 1870, registered at Fowey in 1892 and owned by William Varcoe Kellow of Pentewan
74. Illustration of the ketch White Lady in Par Bay, 1906, with her owner, Ben Tregaskes the Par shipbuilder and four of his seven sons aboard
75. Brilliantly atmospheric and fascinating photograph, full of expression and character showing shipwrights and apprentices from Heller's yard, Fowey; all sitting and standing on a cart after hunting a whale that had entered the harbour
76. Photograph of the dry dock at Par in 1952, built from 1893 by Benjamin Moss Tregaskes, of its kind unique in the West Country
77. Photograph of the Jane Banks: (a) port deck and (b) starboard deck
78. Photograph of Jane Banks leaving Par for the last time in spring 1938
79. Photograph of Sydney James Samuel, the Fowey shipbroker in about 1900
80. Photograph of John Henry Hannan, who continued the Fowey shipbroking business after his father's death in about 1900. Hannan was the son of William Francis Hannan, who was the brother-in-law and partner of Sydney James Samuel (Plate 79)
81. Photo of the hull of the Polperro in the builder's yard of Muller and Broerken, Foxhol, Groningen
82. Photograph of Katie of Padstow under economy canvas. She was owned jointly and personally from 1931 by partners in Clunes & Company, Par coal factors and builders' merchants
83. Photograph of the master and crew of the Bessie Stephens in 1917. Captain Deacon is standing second from left
84. Oil portrait of Captain Charles Henry Deacon (1862-1935) of Charlestown by Arthur Bradbury ARWS who served under him in the Waterwitch
85. Illustration of the St. Germans, which was built by William Walters at Bideford in 1859. She is pictured here off the Eddystone in an oil painting executed for Captain Simon Tabb, her master, by Reuben Chappell in approx. 1904
86. Photo of the motor cargo vessel Polperro of 1983, 403 tons, sunk by enemy action in 1944. She was built in Holland for the H. & S. Shipping Co. of Fowey
87. The Cowes-built cutter yacht Betty, hulked at Par, 1938. She was bought for her spars, lead, sails and gear in 1918 and was then cannibalised

 

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