Letterboxes and postboxes in various colours and available personalised in the UK Home Contact About Us

Slightly Better Books

Category Focus:

Military - Airforce

  Literary gifts for book lovers, gorgeous gift ideas for readers, writers and literature fans
AbeBooks.co.uk
Military - Airforce Books
In Pictures:
****Hyperlinked titles will take you to our copy on sale or prebuilt searches of copies on sale****

Useful Links:
Books on Ebay-see our specially prebuilt search below
Books on Amazon-see our specially prebuilt banner below

Titles to Look Out For:
[In Alphabetical Order. Date signifies earliest edition. Later editions covered by each listing]
2001. Austro-Hungarian Aces of World War I Eastern Front by Christopher Chant
1969. Fighting Colours: RAF Fighter Camouflage and Markings 1937 - 1969 by Michael J. F. Bowyer
2004. Luftwaffe X-Planes: German Experimental and Prototype Planes of World War II by Manfred Griehl
1974. RAF Jet Bomber Flypast by Philip J. R. Moyes
1980. The Stirling Bomber by Michael J. F. Bowyer

On Amazon:
Chant, Christopher. 'Austro-Hungarian Aces of World War 1: Eastern Front', published by Del Prado in 2001, paperback, 64pp, ISBN 8483726327. Sorry, sold out, but click image to access prebuilt search for this title on Amazon UK
2001, Ediciones del Prado, pbk
Sorry, sold out, but click image to access prebuilt search for this title on Amazon UK

Alternative online retailers to try:
Click here to access our prebuilt search for this title on Abebooks

Or click here to access our prebuilt search for this title on Alibris

Or click here to access our prebuilt search for this title on Ebay

 

Alibris UK: books, movies & music

AbeBooks.co.uk

Find this book at Biblio.com!

 

Alibris UK: books, movies & music

AbeBooks.co.uk

Find this book at Biblio.com!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alibris UK: books, movies & music

AbeBooks.co.uk

Find this book at Biblio.com!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alibris UK: books, movies & music

AbeBooks.co.uk

Find this book at Biblio.com!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alibris UK: books, movies & music

AbeBooks.co.uk

Find this book at Biblio.com!

 

 

 

 

 

Alibris UK: books, movies & music

AbeBooks.co.uk

Find this book at Biblio.com!

About the series: Published from 1999 to 2001, 'Aircraft of the Aces: Men & Legends' was a series of 60 booklets published fortnightly by Ediciones del Prado. Every second issue included a 1/100 scale diecast metal model of an aircraft - usually related to the subject of the booklet. The booklets are abridged versions of the original Osprey editions, with the same cover artwork but with the number of pages reduced from 96 to 64, and featuring 150 or more illustrations - including 12 pages of colour drawings.

About this particular book: World War I was the conflict which spelled the end of the Austro-Hungarian empire which for centuries had dominated Central Europe. In 1914, the Empire's armed forces were large, but pooly trained and in general poorly equipped. The air service had only 35 aircraft at the outbreak of the Great War, and these were supplemented by the purchase of German aircraft, few of top quality, thus the fliers of the Austro-Hungarian Empire operating on the Eastern Front were fortunate at first to be faced by small numbers of even more obsolescent aircraft. Austro-Hungarian pilots led by aces such as Godwin Brumowski, Otto Jindra, Benno Fiala and Kurt Gruber flew in extremely difficult geographic, climatic and operational conditions, but were both brave and effective. This is their long-forgotten story

Chapters:
1. An Empire on the Verge of Collapse
2. The Austro-Hungarian Air Arms
3. Russian Opponents
4. World War 1 on the Eastern Front
5. Austro-Hungarian Air Aces of the Eastern Front. This book is profusely illustrated with both black and white and colour plates, which makes it perfect for military aircraft enthusiasts and modellers alike, not forgetting historians and transport enthusiasts

Plates/illustrations:
An Empire on the Verge of Collapse
p6. The Emperor Karl I inspects some of his men at Kezdi-Vasarhely in Romania during 1917
p7. Celebrated Austro-Hungarian pilots of Flik 51J are photographed here on 1st August 1918: Stabsfeldwebel Stefan Fejes, Oberleutenant in Der Reserve Michael Dorcic, Oberleutenant Benno Fiala, Ritter von Fernbrugg, Leutenant Franz Rudorfer and Feldwebel Eugen Bonsch
p7. A Lebed XII of the Imperial Russian Army Air Service armed with a Colt Model 1895
p8. The SPAD S.7 single-seat fighter flown by Staff Captain Aleksandr Aleksandrovich Kasakov
p8. A senior officer of the Austro-Hungarian army casts his eye over an Oeffag-built Albatros fighter (53.20), the first D III from a line that had produced 16 examples of the D II
p9. Godwin Brumowski, Austro-Hungarian 'ace of aces' is pictured in the capacious cockpit of a D I (65.53) 'star-strutter' fighter
p9. Pictured is 03.02, the second of 12 Fokker M.7 biplanes imported from Germany

The Austro-Hungarian Air Arms
p10. The omnicompetent commander of the LFT, Emil Uzelac, talking to a group of Luftfahrtruppen
p11. An Etrich Taube monoplane (officially known as the Type A Class) in flight
p11. Aviatik B II (32.25) built by the parent company with an 89.5 kW (120 hp) Austro-Daimler engine
p12. The Albatros B I, recaptured from the Russians
p12. Aviatik B III, 33.81, a two-seat general-purpose biplane, which was a standard Austro-Hungarian type
p13. 43.75, a WFK-built Lloyd C III two-seater
p13. Albatros D II, a 53-series machine built under licence by Oeffag
p14. 03.19, the 7th of a batch of 12 Fokker M.10e two-seat general purpose aircraft imported from Germany for service
p14. The Hansa-Brandenburg KD's 'star-strutter'
p14. The Lohner Type C (later B II), pictured in 1914
p15. Photo of Stabsfeldwebel Karl Kaszala, 18th on the Austro-Hungarian aces list
p15. Aviatik C I two-seat general purpose warplane, 37.55
p16. A Lloyd C V two-seater of the 46-series
p17. The Aviatik D I seen here in the form of 38.63 of the 38 series
p17. The Oeffag C I, built as the 51 series
p18. A Fokker A III (Austro-Hungarian designation for the E III), No. 03.45
p18. A Knoller C II (19.25), built by Lohner as an armed two-seater
p19. 03.77, the Fokker B II (M.17e2) in flight, piloted by Oberleutenant Fritz Bistrischan
p19. Friedrich Hefty posing in front of a Hansa Brandenburg C I (69-series) of Flik 44F on the Romanian sector in the spring of 1917
p20. 04.11, A Fokker B III imported from the parent company in Germany
p20. A Fokker M.19 single-seat fighter with a group of 4 pilots standing in front of it

Russian Opponents
p21. The Nieuport Nie.17, one of the best fighters available to the Russians before they exited from WW1
p22. Seen here in Russian markings, the Nie.21 was in essence the fighter lead-in trainer of the Nie.17
p22. A line-up of pilots in the Imperial Russian army air service during the winter of 1916-1917, including Captain Aleksandr Aleksandrovich Kazakov (at the back) and Ensign Ivan Vasileyevich Smirnov
p23. 1917 - these officers photographed here commanded the four Russian fighter groups of the time: from left to right they are Staff Captain Kazakov (1st Group); Captain Zemitan (3rd Group); Captain Kruten (2nd Group) and Staff Captain Kulvinski (4th Group)
p23. Photograph of the wreckaged of a Nieuport Nie.17 or 23, the plane in which Captain Yevgraf Nikolayevich Kruten was killed
p23. Photo of a Voisin pusher biplane, obselescent, but kept in service in the Russian army air service
p24. The Anatra DS, otherwise known as the 'Anasal'. This plane was basically a scaled-down version of the Anatra D
p24. Staff Captain Piotr Nikolayevich Nesterov, the first man to loop an aeroplane
p24. The Sikorskii S.16 - a small two seater with side-by-side accommodation. Built by RBVZ to function as an escort for the same company's Ilya Muromets four-engined bomber

Colour Plates
p25. Lohner Type C C.11 flown by Julius Arigi at Flik 6, summer 1915
p26. Fokker A III 03.52 flown by Ludwig Hautzmayer at Flik 19, October 1917
p26. Fokker M.10e 03.09 flown by Friedrich Hefty at Flik 12, spring 1916
p27. Phonix-built Hansa-Brandenburg D I (probably KD28.40) flown by Frank Linke-Crawford at Flik 41J, spring 1917
p27. Hansa-Brandenburg D I (probably 28.11) flown by Karl Kaszala at Flik 41J, May 1917
p28. Phonix-built Hansa-Brandenburg D I (probably 28.58) flown by Johann Risztics at Flik 42J, July 1917
p28. Oeffag-built Albatros D III 153.06 flown by Godwin Brumowski at Flik 41J, August 1917
p29. Oeffag-built Albatros D III (probably 153.12) flown by Karl Aszala at Flik 41J, summer 1917
p29. Oeffag-built Albatros D III 53.27 flown by Franz Graser at Flik 42J, October 1917
p30. Aviatik D I 38.04 flown by Friedrich Hefty at Flik 42J, October 1917
p30. Oeffag-built Albratross DIII 153.45 flown by Godwin Brumowski at Flik 41J, November 1917
p31. Phonix-built Hansa-Brandenburg C I 29.64 flown by Adolf Heyrowsky at Flik 19, late 1917
p31. Oeffag-built Albatros D III 153.46 flown by Eugen Bonsch at Flik 51J, February 1918
p32. Oeffag-built Albatros D III 153.169 flown by Friedrich Hefty at Flik 42J, June 1918
p32. Aviatik D I 338.02 flown by Bela Macourek at Flik IJ, August 1918
p33. Phonix-built Hansa-Brandenburg C I 429.36 flown by Andreas Dombrowski at Flik 57Rb, autumn 1918
p33. Nieuport Nie.17 (serial unknown) flown by Alexander Kazakov, early 1917
p34. SPAD VII (serial unknown) flown by Alexander Kazakov, 1st Combat Air Group, autumn 1917 - overhead view
p35. SPAD VII (serial unknown) flown by Alexander Kazakov, early 1917 - left side view
p35. SPAD VII (serial unknown) of Ivan V. Smirnov, autumn 1917
p36. SPAD VII (serial unknown) of Georges Lachmann, N581, autumn 1917
p36. SPAD VII (serial unknown) of Louis Coudouret, N581, autumn 1917

Russian Opponents cont'd
p37. The Lebel XL (only 10 were ever made) - a two-seat reconnaissance and artillery observance plane
p37. The Nieuport Nie.17 single-seat fighter imported from France and used by the Imperial Russian Army air service's 19th 'Death or Glory' Squadran, one of whose pilots was Lieutenant Ivan Vasileyevich Smirnov, 4th on the list of Russian aces
p37. Photo of Lieutenant Ivan Vasileyevich Smirnov
p37. A Nieuport single-seat piper bearing the large red, white and blue roundels of the Imperial Russian army air service
p38. The Lebed XII, a 2 seat reconnaissance and artillery observation role
p38. The Farman HF.16, a 2 seat pusher bi-plane with a sesquiplane wing cellule
p38. Photo of a heavily wrapped and coated Ensign Jaan Mahlapuu in his Deperdussin monoplane
p39. The Voisin type LA -an available, reliable and capable plane kept in service by the Russian s even after it became obsolete elsewhere
p39. The Moraine-Saulnier Type L parasol-wing monoplane, pictured here in 1918

World War 1 on the Eastern Front
p40. The Morane-Saulnier Type H, wire-braced monoplane was one of the more advanced planes being operated by the Imperial Russian army air service in the opening phases of WW1 on the Easter Front
p40. An unnamed pilot of the Nieuport fighter on the Eastern Front - the masses of clothing he is wearing indicate it's winter
p41. A Lohner Type C (C.51) seen with minor damage after running into a tree on landing. The aeroplane carries the red/white/red stripe marking introduced in 1913 and later became a B II (U) with the revised serial 12.51
p42. A rare air-to-air photograph of air activity over the Eastern Front showing one of the 24 Oeffag C I two-seaters that were built as the 51 series with a 112 kW (150 hp) engine
p42. This Phonix-built Albatros B I (23.08) shown here is famous as being the last to leave the fortress city of Przemysl before the city fell to the Russians
p43. Photograph of Feldwebel Augustin Novak in flying gear - hat, glasses, scarf - during August 1916 while serving with Flik 30 on the Carpathian sector of the Eastern Front
p43. The Nieuport Nie.6M monoplane of the Imperial Russian army air service
p43. Photo showing the Lloyd C V of Flik 30 on an airfield close behind the Eastern front with an Oeffag-built Albatros D III (53.24) and a MAG-built Fokker D I visible behind
p44. A pair of Fokker A III fighters with wings strapped to their sides to reveal red/white/red identification strips. A lorry of the Austro-Hungarian army is towing them to the front
p44. The Anatra D, a standard Russian aeroplane, known generally as the 'Anade', a clean two-seater powered by a 74.6 kW (100 hp) Gnome Monosoupape rotary engine
p45. A photograph showing Flik 13 on the point of departure from its airfield during the course of a retreat from the Russians. The aeroplane in the foreground is Aviatik B II (34.33)
p45. Photo of 4 soldiers or airmen standing in front of a Voisin two-seater of the Imperial Russian army air service (plane was obsolete when this photo was taken)
p45. Oberleutenant Karl Patzelt, photographed in the early summer of 1917 whilst serving with Flik 29, 44th on the list of Austro-Hungarian air aces
p46. Oberleutenant Roman Schmidt is photographed in June 1917 whilst serving with Flik 7 on the Eastern Front (33rd ranked Austro-Hungarian ace). He is in military dress sporting 4 medals
p46. An Oeffag C II (52.63) crashed in woodland - shot down by Grigori Suk of the Imperial Russian army air service on 8th August 1917. The pilot Zugsfuhrer Adolf Rabel was killed, but the observer or gunner Oberleutenant F X Schlarbaum survived to be taken prisoner
p46. Stabsfeldwebel Andreas Dombrowski seen in the cockpit of an Oeffag-built Albatros D III of Flik 29 on the Romanian sector of the Eastern Front
p47. The top photo on this page shows a relative oddity in the Austro-Hungarian air service - the Nieuport Nie.27 captured by the Germans on the Western Front in 1918 and passed to Austria-Hungary for service
p47 Bottom photo shows an Oeffag-built Albatros D III fighter, 53.24, which was used on the Russian and Romanian Fronts from June 1917 by Fliks 13J, 39J, 29J and 31J
p48. Godwin Brumowski poses beside the propeller of a Hansa-Brandenburg KD (or D I) 'star-strutter'. He flew this type of plane up till mid-1917
p49. An Oeffag-built Albatros D III (53.45) seen soon after being crashed into by another pilot
p49. Leutenant in der Reserve Otto Jager seen in late 1916 when Jager was serving with Flik 10 on the Eastern Front
p50. A photo of 6 members of the Austro-Hungarian forces standing in front of a plane on Flik 41J's airfield at Sesana in September 1917. Karl Kaszala is pictured in light trousers thumbing his nose at another non-commissioned pilot, Feldwebel Rademes Iskra
p51. In a photograph taken immediately after Brumowski's 20th victory is shown his Oeffag-built Albatros D III (153.06) with Brumowski standing on the left of the group by the cockpit. The cockpit is occupied by Sergente Ermanno Malaspini, pilot of the down aeroplane, whose observer was Tenente Cesare Mazzarino, seen on the right of the group behind the cockpit. Standing in front of the aeroplane in light trousers is Frank Linke-Crawford, fourth highest-scoring ace of the Austo-Hungarian army air service
p51. Photo of Godwin Brumowski's Oeffag-built Albatros D III (153.45) after a major encounter with Allied fighters, which took place on 1st February 1918. The enemy gunfire punctured the D III's fuel tank and ignited the spilling contents, with a resulting blaze that burned away most of the plane's fabric
p52. In an engagement with 8 British fighters (fighter planes) on 4th February 1918, Godwin Brumowski ended up the loser in his Oeffag-built Albatros DIII (153.52), making a crash landing at Passarella
p52. Photo of the Oeffag-built Albatross D III (153.209), the fighter in which Brumowski gained his final four victories. Here it is seen with a white skull painted on the side and sitting at Portobuffole on the Italian front in June 1918. When Brumowski had his plane painted in red all over, the national markings had to be picked out - the wing crosses ending up in white outline with the fin cross on a white background
p53. The Aviatik B I of Flik I in which Benno Fiala served his apprenticeship in the Eastern Front late in 1914. The airfield in the picture was at Brzesko and the aeroplane carries the original type of national markings - red, white, red stripes - here evident on the sides of the fuselage. Benno Fiala is visible in the front cockpit in this picture
p54. Godwin Brumowski and Benno Fiala pictured with Erzherzogin Maria Theresia; the occasion here was a royal visit to Flik 41J's airfield at Sesana on 26 July 1917
p54. Leutnant Rudolf Szepessy-Sokoll, Freiherr von Negyes et Reno - ranked 46th on the list of Austro Hungarian aces
p55. Oberleutnant in der Reserve Benno Fiala, Ribber von Fernbrugg - 3rd in the list of Austro-Hungarian aces. He stands here in front of his Phonix-built Hansa-Brandenburg KD (D I serialled 28.38) of Flik 12D in the autumn of 1917
p56. A typical Hansa-Brandenburg KD aircraft - 28.48 was built by Phonix for service as the D I. Note the deep rear of the fuselage with the 'comma' fin attached directly to its knife-edge trailing edge without a fixed fin. It was in a similar aeroplane, 28.38 that Benno Fiala gained six of his victories
p57. Offizierstellvertreter Kurt Gruber, 11th on the list of Austro-Hungarian air aces
p57. Photo of the Knoller B I - a two-seater with a high forward decking over its inline engine: in this instance a Thone & Fiala-built training machine in the 35.8 series. The decking combined with a large windscreen provided the crew with good protection from the slipstream
p58. Kurt Gruber seen in the cockpit of his Oeffag-built Albatros D III fighter of Flik 41J at Sesana airfield on 5th October 1917
p59. The funeral cortege of Kurt Gruber crossing the wide expanse of Feltre airfield on 6th April 1918
p59. Photograph of Hauptmann Otto Jindra taken late in 1915
p60. Stabsfeldwebel Andreas Dombrowski photographed whilst serving with Flik 29 in March 1918. He was 27th on the list of Austro-Hungarian air aces
p60. Photo of a crashed Knoller-Albatros B I (22.06), the Flik 1 aeroplane on which Otto Jindra achieved his 3rd victory on 27th August 1915
p61. Summer 1916 photograph of Zugsfuhrer Karl Uban in flying gear with flying glasses. This was at a time when he was serving on the Eastern Front. He was 48th on the list of Austro-Hungarian air aces
p62. Karl Kaszala could still manage a smile after a disastrous landing (his plane is upside down...) at Sesana airfield in May 1917 in a Hansa-Brandenburg KD (D I 28.11)
p62. Feldwebel Julius Busa was 35th on the Austro-Hungarian air aces list and is photographed here whilst serving with Fluggeschwader 1 on the Italian Front in January 1917
p62. Leutnant (later Oberleutnant) in der Reserve Kurt Nachod, photographed in 1915. He was 42nd on the Austro-Hungarian air aces list
p63. Dombromowski was a regular pilot in this Hansa-Brandenburg C I (429.36) whilst serving with Flik 57Rb. Both pilot and observer are wearing parachute harnesses
p63. 36th ranked Austro-Hungarian air ace, this is Feldwebel (later Offizierstellvertreter) Friedrich Hefty of Flik 12
p64. Appendix showing the ranked list of Austro-Hungarian air aces

 

Austro-Hungary in the Wars:

Austro-Hungary Military Forces

Osprey Books on WW1

Early Fighter Planes

WW1 Fighter Planes

Aircraft Magazines:
Bowyer, Michael; Alderson, Alfred M. 'Fighting Colours: RAF Fighter Camouflage and Markings 1937-1969, published in October 1969 in Great Britain in hardback by Patrick Stephens, 192pp, 0850590418. Condition: good, clean ex-library copy with plastic sleeve protecting the dj. Price: £11.95, not including p&p, which is Amazon's standard charge (currently £2.75 for UK buyers, more for overseas customers)
1969, Patrick Stephens Ltd, hbk
Sorry, sold out, but click image to access prebuilt search for this title on Amazon

Alternative online retailers to try:
Click here to access our prebuilt search for this title on Abebooks

Or click here to access our prebuilt search for this title on Alibris

Or click here to access our prebuilt search for this title on Ebay

Alibris UK: books, movies & music

AbeBooks.co.uk

Find this book at Biblio.com!

About the book:
The book covers two topics:
1. The part played in World War 2 by fighters of the Royal Air Force
2. The Markings and Colours of the Aircraft used

It is also concerned with the years of rearmament and considers fighter markings in the years of so-called peace since 1945.

This detailed book is profusely illustrated with b&w photographs and insignia and is packed full of data and facts. It tells the story of the development and changes in Royal Airforce Camouflage and markings over the years 1937-1969, a period which saw massive expansion of the RAF, the momentous years of war, and a long uneasy peace punctuated by the smaller conflicts and tensions of the 'cold war'. In this book, author Michael J. F. Bowyer, and artist Alfred M. Alderson record concisely but comprehensively how RAF fighters and their colours altered over the years, against the background of contemporary events.

Each chapter is illustrated with line drawings depicting specific aircraft in typical markings of their period, and there are 25 pages of these, with well over 130 individual drawings. Included amont the drawings are pages showing roundel and other marking styles and dimensions, typical squadron markings, and some of the markings applied to jet fighters in the 1950s, one of the more colourful periods in the history of RAF camouflage. In addition to the line drawings, there are 157 photographs and comprehensive appendices which give data on all RAF fighter types, a complete listing of all RAF fighter serial allocations, plus squadron and unit code letters, and a listing of official paint shades together with the equivalent colours available to model makers.

Michael Bowyer and Alfred Alderson have, between them, studied and recorded data on aircraft and their colours and markings for many years. Michael Bowyer's own records date back to the mid-1930s. Much of the information presented here is unique, some of the material appearing for the first time in book form. Rather than rely at all on official records - which tend to be incomplete, just as official camouflage directives were sometimes variously interpreted in different units - Michael Bowyer draws from his own records wherever possible in presenting the wealth of information given in this book.

'Fighting Colours' is based on a highly successful series of articles which appeared under the same title in 'Airfix Magazine'. Their popularity leads to this present volume, which has been greatly expanded with much extra text, many additional pictures, and a large number of new drawings. For all aircraft enthusiasts and aircraft modellers in particular, this book is an invaluable source of reference

Chapters:
Foreword; Author's Preface; Illustrations
1. 1937-38: Into warpaint
2. 1939-40: Fighters at war
3. Summer, 1940
4. 1940-41: Fighters overseas
5. 1940-41: Fighters at night
6. 1941: On the Offensive
7. 1941-42: Fighters from America
8. 1942: Offensive over Europe
9. 1942-43: Night Fighters Supreme
10. 1941-43: Fighters in the Desert
11. 1943-44: Middle East and Italy
12. 1941-45: Fighters in the Far East
13. 1943-44: New marks, new types
14. 1941-45: Fighters in the Far East
15. 1944-45: Fighters in Europe
16. 1945-50: Fighters in peace
17. 1950-69: Fighters in the Cold War
Appendices

1969, Patrick Stephens, hbk (1st Edition)

1975, Patrick Stephens reprint

Plane Camouflage

Griehl, Manfred. 'Luftwaffe X-Planes: German Experimental and Prototype Planes of World War II', published in 2004 in Great Britain by Greenhill Books, in hardback with dustjacket, 80pp, ISBN 1853675776. Sorry, sold out, but click image to access prebuilt search for this title on Amazon UK
2004, Greenhill Books, hbk
Sorry, sold out, but click image above to access prebuilt search for this title on Amazon UK

Alternative online retailers to try:
Click here to access our prebuilt search for this title on Abebooks

Or click here to access our prebuilt search for this title on Alibris

Or click here to access our prebuilt search for this title on Ebay

Alibris UK: books, movies & music

AbeBooks.co.uk

Find this book at Biblio.com!

 

 

 

 

 

Alibris UK: books, movies & music

AbeBooks.co.uk

Find this book at Biblio.com!

 

 

 

 

 

Alibris UK: books, movies & music

AbeBooks.co.uk

Find this book at Biblio.com!

 

 

 

 

 

Alibris UK: books, movies & music

AbeBooks.co.uk

Find this book at Biblio.com!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alibris UK: books, movies & music

AbeBooks.co.uk

Find this book at Biblio.com!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alibris UK: books, movies & music

AbeBooks.co.uk

Find this book at Biblio.com!

About this book/synopsis: In spite of a ban implemented by allied authorities, many different types of aircraft were designed and tested by the Luftwaffe and German manufacturers before the second world war; Germany simply conducted the research at secret locations in Germany, Switzerland, Sweden and Russia.

Naturally, when war broke out, the research continued, although some projects remained on the drawing board or as prototypes because they were not good enough to take forward, or were just not suitable. In other cases, the developers ran out of time or resources, hampered by the lack of materials due to the Allied campaigns.

Aviation expert Manfred Griehl has painstakingly assembed a valuable selection of images which show the remarkable range of projects dreamed up by German designers. Had these innovative projects ever been realised, the course of WWII could have been drastically different. The appendices list the German experimental planes in a table cross-referencing manufacturer with aircraft type, call sign, works no., date, place, name and remarks. Appendix 2 lists the evaluation units of the Luftwaffe and what their purpose was, for example that Erprobungskommando 4 was responsible for evaluating the X-4 missile.
A very useful and informative book

Chapters:
Preface
Early years of aircraft evaluation in Germany
Testing Centre (Erprobungsstelle, or E-Stelle for short) Rechlin
Testing Centre (Sea) Travemunde
Testing Centre Tarnewitz
Research and Testing Centre Peenemunde-West
Testing Centre Udetfield
Testing Centre Tropen
Testing Centre Sud
Testing Centre Werneuchen
Testing Centre Munster-Nord
Winter Testing at Dorpat
Private Aircraft Evaluation and Testing
Plates
Appendix 1: Testing Centre Command Structure
Appendix 2: Evaluation Units of the Luftwaffe

Plates include:
1931. Arado Ar 65
1937. Ar 68 HV1 (D-ISIX)
Heinkel He 45C
Ar 95, a reconnaissance aircraft
Page 18. Oberst Udet -laster the Commanding Officer of the Technisches Amt (Technical Office) of the Luftwaffe. Seen here with the artist Stor
Page 18. Seventh prototype of the Henschel Hs 123 (V7, D-IHBO, production number 0985)
Page 19. Ar 198 V1 (D-ODLG), reconnaissance, built by Arado
Page 19. Hamburger Flugzeugbau Ha 141, later called the Blohm & Voss BV 141 - was only flown in small quantities (pilots complained of feeling sick)
Page 20. Photo focused on the MG 15 machine gun (which was fitted to the Arado Ar 66, Gotha Go 145 and the Ar 96)
Page 20. The first Ar 96 V1 (D-IRUU)
Page 21. A Ju 87 Vs (D-UHUH) dive bomber, flown for the first time on 25th Feb, 1936
Page 21. The Heinkel He 118 V1 (D-UKYM) - an unarmed craft fitted with a Rolls-Royce Buzzard engine
Page 22. A well-armoured version of the Fw 189 reconnaissance aircraft by Focke-Wulf
Page 22. An early version of the Do 17 was flown at the International Flugmeeting at Dubendorf as a Do 17 K (production number 0691)
Page 22-23. The 3rd Dornier Do 17 fast bomber prototype (D-ABIH, production no. 0258)
Page 23. The second Ju 88 V2 (D-ASAZ, production no. 4942) - first flew 10th April, 1937
Page 24. A rare view of the first He 111, initially named the He 111a V1 (D-ADAP, production number 713)
Page 24. The Ju 288, a modern bomber with powerful engines and a heavy defensive armament. Designed by Junkers to compete with the Arado and Dornier designs
Page 25. A mock-up of an Fw 191 bomber, designed and built as a Bomber B competitor
Page 25. The Fw 191 V1 and V2 - first evaluated with BMW 801C-0 engines installed
Page 26. The first experimental Fw 190 V1 (D-OPZE)
Page 26. The first Fw 190 V1
Page 27. The He 112 and the Bf 109 - they were opponents in the competition for a powerful single-seat piston-engined fighter
Page 27. The He 112 V4 (prod. no. 1943)
Page 28. Major Seidemann demonstrating the impressive performance of the new standard fighter, the Bf 109 V7 during the 4th International Flugmeeting at Dubendorf, 1937
Page 28. The last series of the famous Bf 109 was built in Austria at the Wiener Neustadter Flugzeugwerke. Shown also on page 29
Page 29. Metal parts were substituted by wooden ones where possible to save precious resources. The Hirth Werke used plastic and wood substitutes
Page 30. The Focke-Wulf airfield at Langenhagen where the new Fw 190D, Ta 152 and Ta 154 were all evaluated
Page 30. The Fw 190 V65 prototype
Page 31. The cockpit of the Fw 187 V1
Page 31. The view into the forward fuselage of the Me 264 V1 showing a prototype fitted only with the instruments needed for early flight tests
Page 31. A cabin mock-up of the Ar 234 B
Page 32. The Fw 187 V1, production number 949
Page 32. The Bf 110 V3 prototype (D-ATII, production number 0870)
Page 33. The Bf 162 V1 prototype (D-AABA, production number 811), flown for the first time on 9th March 1938, with Dr. Herrmann Wurster in control
Page 33. The German "Wooden Wonder", the Ta 154 -seen as a heavy aircraft destroyer, night fighter and light bomber. The plane shown was flown by Professor Kurt Tank himself
Page 34. The Ar 240 and the Ar 240 as crashed in Poland due to undercarriage failure
Page 35. A mock-up of a Ju 388 J night fighter with an early radar installation
Page 35. The He 21 V33 (DV+DL, production number 190063) - an A-) aircraft operated by the Telefunken works to evaluate the latest wireless sets then available (summer of 1944)
Page 36. The He 219 V33 prototype, flown for the 1st time on 29th September 1943 and recovered from a lake in the middle of Germany on 6th October 2000
Page 36. TD+SI, production number 8971 - an experimental single-engine fighter for the evaluation of the Fw 190 A-5/U15 series by the torpedo evaluation site at Gotenhafen-Hexengrund
Page 37. The same TD+SI aircraft - a side view
Page 37. The Fw 190 A-8, used as an experimental aircraft with a single BV 246 Hagelkorn missile fixed under an ETC 502 mounting
Page 38. An early Hs 293 V2 glide bomb carried under an He 111 Hs, rebuilt to carry this type of missile
Page 38. Some 100 He 111 H-16s and a few H-20 and H-22 variants were modified to carry FZG 76 V1 weapons
Page 39. An He 111 H aircraft seen at Peenemunde-West, used for trials with the Lt 950 torpedo
Page 40. Several He 111 Hs were used for testing new equipment for future Luftwaffe combat aircraft
Page 40. The remote controlled FDL 131/C gun turret, as fitted on both sides of the fuselage of the Me 410 combat aircraft
Page 41. The Ju 88 C-6 was fitted with a turntable turret housing two 3 cm MK 103 guns, each fitted with 200 explosive rounds of varying kinds
Page 41. The He 177 A-1 was modified to be evaluated under combat conditions with a double moveable weapon mount fitted in the nose
Page 42. Test pilots and technicians pose for a photo in front of the He 60b (D-2325) in December 1932
Page 42. An He 59 crew greet their comrades (whilst airborn, waving!) on their way back from their designated test sector over the Baltic during RDL torpedo trials at Travemunde
Page 43. An He 60 short-range reconnaissance aircraft sits atop a catapult (used on larger warships of the Kriegsmarine)
Page 43. The first prototype of the Hamburger Flugzeugbau Ha 138, a long-range reconnaissance flying boat (later the BV 138 V2, D-AMOR, production number 113). First flown on the 14th July 1936
Page 44. The Blohm & Voss BV 222 - among the largest of the flying boats operated by the Luftwaffe after WWII started
Page 44-45 - the largest German flying boat ever built was constructed and built by Blohm and Voss at Hamburg-Finkenwerder. It took off for the first time on 10th March 1944
Page 45. The Goppingen Go9 - built as a flying scale-model of the Dornier project P 192, which later became the huge Do 214 flying boat
Page 46. The first Fi 156 (D-IBXY)
Page 46. The Fi 256 V1 - flown for the first time on 9th July 1941 with Dipl.-Ing. Willy Fielder at the helm
Page 46. The Ar 232 - the Luftwaffe's first truly all-terrain transport. The picture shows the first prototype, Ar 232 V1 (GH+GN)
Page 47. The second Ju 352 V1 (CH+JA, production number 100001) at Fritzlar during maintenance work
Page 47. The Fw 200 V1, seen warming up its Pratt & Whitney Hornet radials before its first take-off from the Neuenlander Feld on 6th September 1937. This aircraft was intensively trialled as D-AERE then refitted with BMW 132 L radials
Page 48. The DFS 230 introduced as a so-called Lastensegler (shortened to LS 1, which means cargo glider)
Page 48. The DFS 230 (CB+MW) was placed on a wheeled undercarriage to help train pilots to fly the new German Gigant aircraft such as the large Me 321 gliders. The undercarriage gave the impression the plane was much larger than it actually was
Page 49. An experimental version of the DFS 230, tested as a sea-glider and fitted with two floats taken from an Ar 196 float plane
Page 49. A modified Go 242 glider with the double fin turned into a central fin section
Page 50. Towing aircraft with adequate power were used to move huge Me 321 gliders - either a 4-engined Ju 290, a 5-engined He 111 Z or three Bf 110s. The photo shows the Ju 290 Z-3 (KB+LA, production number 900002), with many Giganten (Giants) dispersed around the airfield awaiting a first test flight
Page 50. Less than 20 He 111 Z-1s were produced to tow large transport gliders
Page 50. The initial tests of the largest German glider, the Ju 322 VI Mammut (Mammoth) failed due to instability. The huge glider was developed as the Junkers EF 94
Page 51. The Flettner Fl 282 V6 (GF+YF), a small helicopter for liaison and reconnaissance
Page 52. The Fa 223 V11 (DM+SO), production number 00011
Page 52. The WNF 342 V4 experimental helicopter
Page 53. The Junkers EF 61 - an experimental type used in researching high-altitude flight. First flew 4th March 1937
Page 53. The second Hs 128 V2 (D-ARHD) - another experimental aircraft for high-altitude flight
Page 54. The Hs 130 A-0 hight altitude reconnaissance aircraft was proposed for a second version - to see use as a bomber. The picture shows a wooden mock-up of experimental version Hs 130 C-0
Page 54. The Do 217 PV1 (BK+IR), production number 1229, Dornier's own design for a high-altitude combat aircraft
Page 55. A rocket-powered glider - built to reach an altitude of 20,000 metres
Page 55. Dipl. Ing. Ziegler standing in the cockpit of the VI prototype
Page 55. A DFS 230, fitted with two Argus ramjets by the DFS at Ainring near Bad Reichenhall in Bavaria. The tests are being observed by Generalfeldmarschall Milch
Page 56. A Go 145 (D-IIWS) light aircraft fitted with the Argus 014 ramjet engine
Page 56. The Do 217 E-2 (RE+CD) fitted with a 10.6 metre-long, 1.5 metre diameter, high temperature ramjet on the fuselage. Erich Klockner made a number of test flights in this
Page 57. The four-piston-engined German bomber, the He 177
Page 57. The He 177 V29 (GO+IF, production number 15155) was an aircraft belonging to the A-1 series
Page 58. The 11th prototype of the Ju 288 (V11, D-ANXN, later DF+CQ, production number 0011) - took off for the first time on 21st July 1942.
Page 58. The Me 264 - of which only 1 experimental craft was ever completed
Page 59. V101 (NN+QQ) was an A-3 aircraft rebuilt to B-5 standards and was the first of the four He 177 B-5 long range bomber aircraft prototypes ordered by the RLM
Page 59. The Ju 287 prototype as seen from the front
Page 60. The Me 163, a smaller aircraft, a so-called point-defence fighter that could be produced in smaller factories
Page 60. Prototype of the Me 328. The aircraft shown could be the second prototype for the A series (a batch of 10 aircraft were ordered
Page 61. The third prototype of the Me 262 (PC+UC) seen standing under the huge wings of an Me 321 transport glider
Page 62. Photo of one of the new, but unfamiliar engines chosen for the Me 262 fighter
Page 62. The Focke-Wulf "TL-Jager mit HeS 011" - a jet fighter with a single Heinkel HeS 011 jet engine. One of the combat aircraft never completed due to missing parts and shortages
Page 63. A Bachem BP 20 Natter (Adder). First manned experiment carried out on 3rd November 1944
Page 63. The second prototype of the Horten H IX V2, equipped with two Jumo 004 Bs, flown by Erwin Ziller on 18th December 1944, with the first official take-off on 2nd Feb, 1945
Page 64. A Bachem Natter taken in Southern Germany, 1944/45
Page 64. The Messerschmitt P 1101 - a German research aircraft with a single engine fitted in the fuselage and swept-back wings
Page 65. The Goppingen Go 9 (D-EBYW) - used for testing Do 17 fuselage and wings in 1/2.5 scale, fitted with a small Hirth HM 60 R engine of 80 hp
Page 65. An He 70 - they were used for testing new equipment; unarmed ones sometimes took off on personnel transport or liaison duties
Page 66. The He 116 - there were three experimental versions of this aircraft
Page 66. The He 115. Four experimental aircraft (4 A-0s and 1 B-aircraft) were fitted with an enlarged bomb release system
Page 67. The Do 26
Page 67. Photo of the modern electronics system (new types of wireless set and rear warning systems were becoming available in late 1944) inside a Ju 388 L-1, one of the last Luftwaffe combat aircraft powered by piston engines capable of high-altitude flying
Page 68. The Ju 290 long range reconnaissance aircraft, of which a few were tested at Rechlin. The pictured aircraft has been fitted with an FuG 200 radar and heavy defensive armament
Page 68. The third experimental Me 262 aircraft - the first to be flown powered by two early Jumo jet engines. First flight went up on the 18th July 1942 with Fritz Wendel in control
Page 69. The Me 262 A-1 (designated V 303, prod. no. 170 303), which became the new seventh prototype when the 7th experimental Me 262 (prod. no. 130007) was lost
Page 69. Me 262 A-1, number V056, derived from its production number 170056. Used for testing radar antennas under high-speed conditions. This experimental aircraft was jet-powered, the first of its kind like this specifically used to support the development of the night fighter variant, the Me 262 B-2

 

Books on the Luftwaffe:

German WW2 Aircraft Books

Allied Aircraft of WW2 Books

The Royal Airforce in the World Wars

German Aircraft Books

Moyes, Philip J.R. 'RAF Jet Bomber Flypast', published in 1974 in Great Britain by Ian Allan Ltd in hardback, 64pp, ISBN 0711004994. Sorry, sold out, but click image above to access prebuilt search for this title on Amazon UK
1974, Ian Allan Ltd, hbk
Sorry, sold out, but click image above to access prebuilt search for this title on Amazon UK

Alternative online retailers to try:
Click here to access our prebuilt search for this title on Abebooks

Or click here to access our prebuilt search for this title on Alibris

Or click here to access our prebuilt search for this title on Ebay

Alibris UK: books, movies & music

AbeBooks.co.uk

Find this book at Biblio.com!

 

 

 

 

Alibris UK: books, movies & music

AbeBooks.co.uk

Find this book at Biblio.com!

 

 

 

 

Alibris UK: books, movies & music

AbeBooks.co.uk

Find this book at Biblio.com!

 

 

 

 

Alibris UK: books, movies & music

AbeBooks.co.uk

Find this book at Biblio.com!

 

 

 

 

Alibris UK: books, movies & music

AbeBooks.co.uk

Find this book at Biblio.com!

 

 

 

 

 

Alibris UK: books, movies & music

AbeBooks.co.uk

Find this book at Biblio.com!

  • RAF Jet Bomber Flypast [top]
    Written by Philip J. R. Moyes
    First published in 1974 in Great Britain by Ian Allan Ltd in hardback, 64pp, ISBN 0711004994. Original UK retail price when first sold: £1.65
    Cover: A Buccaneer S2 strike aircraft of 12 Squadron from Honington is refuelled in flight by a Victor K1A tanker
    Perfect for aircraft enthusiasts and modellers with an interest in the UK's Royal Air Force- contains approximately 100 photographs, eight of which are in colour

About this book/synopsis: This book was produced as a companion volume to RAF Jet Fighter Flypast, published in 1972. It contains a collection of around 100 photographs (which makes it of huge importance to aircraft enthusiasts and modellers), 8 of which are in colour; and they illustrate the various types of jet bomber aircraft with which the Royal Air Force has been equipped since the introduction of the Canberra into squadron service in May 1951. Also included is a machine which did not enter service - the Short Sperrin - a plane that merits a place in this book because it was designed and built as an insurance against the failure of the more ambitious designs which became famous as the V-bombers. The aircraft are presented chronologically by date of entry into service of the initial RAF version, but the various versions and marks of each basic type have been deliberately mixed together. Some reconnaissance, intruder and tanker variants have been included and, as with the earlier volume, the overall aim has been to present an interesting selection of good

quality photographs taken from as many angles as possible and at the same time producing a pleasing layout. Since many Avro and Handley Page negatives are no longer available due to a fire that wiped out a lot of them in Manchester, the pictures in this book should be of great interest to all: modellers and enthusiasts alike

Chapters:
English Electric Canberra
Vickers Valiant
Short Sperrin
Colour Plates
Avro Vulcan
Handley Page Victor
Hawker Siddeley Buccaneer

Photos
English Electric Canberra:
1. English Electric Canberra, fourth production, B(I)8 light bomber intruder shows off ventral gun pack containing four 20mm cannon
2. Formation of 3 Canberra B2s of 101 squadron seen 1951/2 winter on a sortie from Binbrook, Lincolnshire, UK
3. Canberra prototype VN799 takes off from Warton, near Preston, Lancs on maiden flight, May 13, 1949. Note original rounded fin and rudder
4. A B6 of 12 Squadron gets smartly airborne at Hal Far, Malta for a raid on an Egyptian military installation in the Canal Zone during the 1956 Suez Crisis.
5. Wintry scene at Binbrook 1951/52 when 101 Squadron, the first operational squadron to receive Canberras, demonstrated its B2s to the press
6. A brand new Canberra B6 pictured during a test flight from Warton. This mark differed from the earlier B2 bomber in having more powerful Rolls Royce Avon engines, increased tankage and greater flight range
7. B6s all in a line preparing for take-off from their Lincolnshire base and all from 9 Squadron. They are sporting the unit's famous bat insignia on their fins and Binbrook Wing flashes in red on their noses
8. Two B(I)6s of 213 Squadron from Bruggen, Germany pose for the camera in flight in the summer of 1960. Both have the standard B(I)6-type wing stores pylons, but only one of the planes has the ventral gun pack which was a well-known feature of this interim night intruder version
9. Top personnel of the Glenn L. Martin company observe the demonstration of a Canberra B2 bomber piloted by Wing Commander Roland Beaumont in 1951 at Baltimore, Maryland. Martin went on to build Canberras under licence for the US Air Force
10. Three Canberra B6s of 12 Squadron fly in echelon starboard formation during a sortie from Binbrook in September 1958.
11. Ex-RAF Canberras pictured at BAC's Salmesbury airfield, near Preston, awaiting refurbishment prior to sale overseas
12. A trio of B16s of 6 Squadron from Akrotiri, Cyprus, in early 1962
13. Canberras were also built under sub-contract by Avro, Handley Page and Short Brothers. The first Avro-built machine, B2 WJ971 is seen here on its maiden flight from Woodford, Cheshire on November 25, 1952, piloted by test pilot J. D. Baker
14. A Canberra B6 is loaded with 1,000 lb medium capacity bombs. Each Canberra can carry 6,000lb bomb load
15. Shows final assembly of Canberra B2s at English Electric's Warton factory
16. This photo shows the clean lines of the Canberra, emphasised in this head-on view. This is the first prototype, VN799, piloted by Wing Commander Roland Beaumont
17. The Napier Double Scorpion Rocket motor test bed Canberra B2 at the Farnborough Air Show in the late 1950s
18. An amazing photo of a Canberra B6 being pull round past the vertical of a loop prior to 'rolling off the top' by Squadron Leader L. G. Bastard, commanding officer of 9 Squadron
19. A B(I)8, carrying the cross keys badge and black tail band of 16 Squadron, on a sortie from Laarbruch, Germany, in the summer of 1960
20. An unusual view of B6 of 101 Squadron sporting on its nose the Binbrook Canberra Wing lightning flash in black and white
21. Four Canberra B1s of 21 Squadron from Scampton, Lincolnshire, flying in formation past the mountains of Aden during a training visit to the Middle East Air Force in 1955
22. The first B(I)6 conversion, WT307, carrying gun pack and underwing bombs, seen on test in 1955
23. A Canberra B15 of 45 Squadron, based at Tengah, Singapore, seen at Chiengmai, Northern Thailand, during exercise Dhanarajata in 1963
24. Ferocious-looking B(I)8 of 16 Squadron at RAF Laarbruch, 1972

Vickers Valiant
25. A Valiant B(K)1 of 3 Group fitted with long-range wing tanks
26. A Valiant B1 nearest the camera with Mark 1 versions of the RAF's two other types of V bomber, the Vulcan and Victor
27. Prototype Valiant (WB210) showing the original narrow slot-type intakes
28. Valiant BK1 with nose probe for flight refuelling
29. A B(PR)1 in the camouflage introduced shortly before all Valiants were grounded because of metal fatigue problems in December 1964.
30. A nice, clear photo of XD823 taken over the sea
31. A crew scramble to their aircraft at Wyton Hunts, during a visit to the station by HRH Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh in June 1958
32. The final production Valiant XD875 taking off from Brooklands for delivery to the RAF on August 27, 1957
33. Close up of a B(K)1 fitted with overload tanks. Ventral nose blister housed the bomb-aimer
34. A photo of the B1 used to test the Avro Blue Steel stand-off bomb, B1 WP204
35. The 'Black Bomber', the prototype Valiant B2. This plane had underslung pods into which the bogie undercarriage retracted backwards, a distinctive feature
36. A Valiant PR(K)1 of 543 Squadron formating with a Canberra PR9 and a PR7 from 58 Squadron, Wyton, in November 1961
37. Night servicing scene featuring a Valiant of 'B' Flight, Wittering, October 1956
38. Sole example of the B2 prototype which was designed for low-level pathfinding and nicknamed the 'black bomber' because of its night paint. It did not enter RAF service
39. Service Chief gives starting instructions to a Valiant captain through outside intercomm at Wittering in August 1956
40. A Valiant tanker fitted with long range tanks refuels a receiver Valiant
41. Shows one of the two twin Valiant production lines at Weybridge. The Valiant was the first of the 'V' class four-jet bombers to enter RAF squadron service
42. Valiants of the 138 Squadron at Gaydon, Hunts, which re-formed in January 1955. This squadron was the first to receive the type
43. A good overhead photograph of a newly-camouflaged Valiant B(K)1. This livery was adopted for all V-bombers that assumed a low-level role early in 1964
44. Another camera angle on B(K)1 XD823. A machine from the same production batch dropped Britain's first atomic H bomb at Christmas Island on May 15th, 1957
45. B(PR)K1 WZ395 of 148 Squadron scrambles during a demonstration at the Farnborough Air Show
46. Another Farnborough Show occasion - ten Valiants of 138 Squadron lined up prior to a fomation flight

Short Sperrin
47 and 48. 2 photos which show the underside, cockpit and engines

Colour Plates
49. Canberra B2 of RAF Strike Command serving in a training role in 1973
50. Similar to the Canberra bomber is Canberra T4 dual control trainer that entered service in 1954. This example, from 231 OCU, RAF Cottesmore, was photographed in February 1973
51. Valiant of 214 (tanker) Squadron photographed on take-off from Wisley
52. Vulcan B2, armed with a Blue Steel stand-off bomb over the Niagara Falls
53. A Blue Steel-carrying Vulcan B2 is service prior to a night exercise
54. Vulcan B2 of the NEAF Bomber Wing over Cyprus in 1973
55. Victor B1 in the white anti-flash finish once adopted by Bomber Command's V-bomber force
56. Buccaneer S2 of 237 OCU, Honington, carrying underwing rocket pods

Avro Vulcan
57. A Vulcan of 617 Squadron on a sortie from Scampton, Lincs, carrying a Blue Steel stand-off bomb
58. A B2 of the NEAF Bomber Wing, sporting type B roundels and fin flashes, on a sortie from Akrotiri, Cyprus, in February 1973
59. The take-off of a Blue Steel-carrying Vulcan B2 dramatically captured
60. Second prototype Vulcan deploys its brake parachute at the 1957 Farnborough Air Show
61. A Vulcan B2 carrying 2 Douglas Skybolt aerodynamic test vehicles. The Skybolt air-launched ballistic missile development programme was cancelled in 1962 in favour of the submarine-launched Polaris
62. A B2 in the high gloss camouflage introduced in 1964 for low-level operations, armed with the Blue Steel
63. A B2 of Strike Command undergoes a maintenance check at its dispersal before a night sortie
64. Second prototype Vulcan, VX777, showing to advantage the type's original delta planform with straight swept leading edges
65. A B2 of the NEAF Bomber Wing takes off past a Lightning of 23 Squadron at Akrotiri in November 1972
66. B2 XM599 releases its full 'conventional' load of 21 1,000lb bombs in salvo
67. Vulcan B2s at Tengah, Singapore, during a visit to the Far East
68. A Vulcan B2 formates with a Spitfire 14 over RAF Finningley, Yorks, in 1968
69. Early Production Vulcan B1 of 230 OCU, Waddington, sporting the City of Lincoln coat of arms on its fin
70. A Vulcan of 83 Squadron is marshalled at Waddington after a night sortie
71. Head-on study of the first prototype Vulcan emphasising its clean lines
72. Two strategic bombers-an RAF Vulcan and a USAF Boeing B-47

Handley Page Victor
73. A Victor B1 of 10 Squadron-first squadron to be equipped with the Handley Page crescent-wing bomber-shows it's air brakes off during a sortie from Cottesmore, Rutland, in 1958
74. A B2BS (or B2R as the type was also known), in camouflage for low-level penetrations, carrying an Avro Blue Steel stand-off bomb
75. A K1A three-point tanker of 57 squadron is shadowed by a Buccaneer and a Phantom
76. A Victor B1 from A&AEE, Boscombe Down, is refuelled by a USAF KB-50J during compatibility trials in 1961
77. Shark-like Blue Steel stand-off bomb beneath a Victor B2 test platform in late 1961
78. A K1A of 57 Squadron deploys its brake parachute on landing
79. Prototype Victor WB771 seen in its original natural metal finish. This plane first flew on December 24th, 1952 at Boscombe Down
80. A B1 of 15 Squadron is marshalled in at Cottesmore after a night sortie in December 1958
81. SR2 XL161 of 543 Squadron streams its brake parachute after touching down. The photo shows the Kuchemann "carrots" - aerodynamic modifications - on the wings
82. A Blue Steel training round is manhandled under the belly of a Victor B2BS of 139 (Jamaica) Squadron at Wittering. ECM "warts" can be seen around Victor's tail cone
83. B1 XA930 flying in August 1958 with large auxiliary underwing tanks and the prototype FR probe installation
84. XA930 was previously used for RATOG trials with two DH Sprites carried in underwing packs
85. A 55 Squadron Victor K1A tanker refuels a CAF CF-5A during trials from RAF Marham, Norfolk
86. A Victor B2 on test from Radlett. The first operational unit to receive the type was 139 Squadron at Wittering, February 1962
87. XL231, shown in this photo on test from HSA's Woodford facility in early 1972, was the first Victor to be converted by Hawker Siddeley to a K2 tanker
88. This photo shows another view of the prototype Victor B1 in its 1953 SBAC Display paint scheme
89. A B1A of 15 Squadron drops its full "conventional" bomb load of thirty-five 1,000lb bombs at Song Song Range in 1964

Hawker Siddeley Buccaneer
90. A Buccaneer S2 armed with 10,000lb of bombs streaks across RAF Elvington airfield near York during heavy load handling trials in 1972
91. A Buccaneer S2 carrying the unique Roman style numerals of 15 Squadron takes off from its base at Laarbruch on the Dutch/German border
92. S2 aircraft of 12 Squadron lined up at Honington, Suffolk. The photo shows the aircraft sporting the fox's mask badge on the engine air intakes
93. Four Buccaneers in flight alongside each other (echelon port formation). 12 Squadron was the first RAF squadron to receive the Buccaneer at Honington in 1969
94. Photograph of an S2 armed with Martel missiles being catapulted from HMS Ark Royal during deck trials
95. Photo of a Buccaneer looking fat and with wings folded up. An aircraft of 12 Squadron is the subject in B type national insignia at Decimomannu, Sardinia, 1972
96. Photo shows off the additional bomb door fuel tank that RAF Buccaneers can carry - this increases the normal internal capacity by 425 without any loss of weapon carriage capability
97. An S2 shows off its load of four Martel missiles during trials at Hawker Siddeley's test airfield at Holme-on-Spalding Moor, Yorkshire, UK
98. This photo shows off the black and gold insignia of 16 Squadron on this aircraft photographed at Laarbruch, Germany, in 1973
99. An S2 of 12 Squadron fires a salvo of 68mm SNEB rockets during armament practice in December 1972
100. A Buccaneer carrying twelve 1,000lb bombs on the wing pylons. In addition a further four 1,000lb bombs can be carried internally in the rotating bomb bay, giving a total weapon load of 16,000lb

Other books on RAF planes:

Other books of plane photos:

Books on the Royal Air Force:

Books about jet bombers:



Books about jet fighters:

Bowyer, Michael J. F. 'The Stirling Bomber', first published in 1980 in Great Britain by Faber and Faber in hardback with dustjacket, 225pp, ISBN 0571111017. Sorry, sold out, but click image to access prebuilt search for this title on Amazon UK
1980, Faber and Faber, hbk
Sorry, sold out, but click image to access prebuilt search for this title on Amazon UK

Alternative online retailers to try:
Click here to access our prebuilt search for this title on Abebooks

Or click here to access our prebuilt search for this title on Alibris

Or click here to access our prebuilt search for this title on Ebay

Alibris UK: books, movies & music

AbeBooks.co.uk

Find this book at Biblio.com!

 

 

 

 

 

Alibris UK: books, movies & music

AbeBooks.co.uk

Find this book at Biblio.com!

About this book/synopsis: The Short Stirling, derived from Short's flying-boat range was the RAF's first four-engined bomber of the Second World War. It entered service in 1940, having more than its fair share of teething problems. This detailed and illustrated book recounts how the bomber came to take a major part in the strategic offensive until 1943, forming the equipment of 3 Group, Bomber Command. Then it was switched to transport duties, Stirling crews gallantly playing a major part in the Arnhem landing after towing gliders to Normandy and again during the Rhine crossing. Crews have recounted for this book some of their memories of these events. The Stirling Bomber offers the most extensive coverage of the aircraft's career yet to appear. It is supported by maps, performance graphs, production details and listings of aircraft used by squadrons. Many of the photographs have not been previously published.

Contents:
List of illustrations; abbreviations and terms; Preface
Prologue: Just Remembering
1. A Project Defined
2. Tribulations and Trials
3. Into Service
4. Let Battle Commence
5. Daylight Interlude
6. Increasing Momentum
7. A Super Stirling
8. The 1942 Offensive
9. Enter the Mk. III
10. The 1943 Offensive and Finale
11. Escape from Denmark
12. A New Role
13. Preparing for the Invasion
14. Adventure over Arnhem
15. The Last Rounds
16. Passengers and Freight; Key to Camouflage Colours

Appendices:
1. Stirling Airframe Serial Numbers, Associated Mark Number and Engine Marks
2. Summary of Stirling Squadrons
3. Summary of Stirling Training and Miscellaneous Units
4. Serial Numbers of Stirlings Allocated to Squadrons
5. Long Service and Outstanding Stirling Squadrons of 3 Group, 1941-4; Index

Illustrations (plates) Included:
Frontispiece: A Silhouette of a Stirling Bomber
1. The half-scale Stirling (Short's)
2. Mk. V. prototype on a test flight (Short's)
3. L7605, the second prototype
4. N3638 at Belfast (Short's)
5. The first Belfast-built Stirling (Short's)
6. N3637 of 7 Squadron (J. Buchan)
7. Stirling production line January 1941 (Short's)
8. Cockpit layout of early aircraft (Short's)
9. Bomb aimer's compartment (Short's)
10. Looking aft along the fuselage (Short's)
11. Stirling N3568 after crashing in Holland (via G. J. Zwanenburg)
12. Stirling R9147 at Waterbeach
13. R9295 of 149 squadron (via T. Cushing)
14. Bombing-up 'D-Dog' at Oakington (RCAF)
15. 'H-Harry' of XV Squadron by St. Paul's Cathedral (via N. J. Robertson)
16. Stirling R9304 in flight (IWM)
17. Flying Officer P. J. S. Boggis at the helm of 'MacRobert's Reply' (P.J.S. Boggis)
18. 'MacRobert's Reply' after colliding with a Spitfire (M. Schoeman)
19. N3709 at Oakington (IWM/Planet News)
20. Stirling low over the factory airfield (via C. Gilks)
21. Not all homecomings were good (J. Helme)
22. The rough side of 'P-Peter' (F. Griggs)
23. Sergeant Griggs and crew examine the damage to N3751 (P. O' Hara)
24. Stirling III in factory finish (S. Phillips)
25. N3752 of 149 Squadron after crashing in Denmark (J. Helme)
26. The sortie record holder, N3721 (O. A. Morris)
27. N3711, a Mk. II trials aircraft (IWM)
28. Stirling III BK649
29. Stirling III BF509 on a maker's test flight (Short's)
30. Mines being loaded aboard a Stirling of 218 Squadron (O. A. Morris)
31. The mines arrive for a Stirling of 199 Squadron (J. L. Smith)
32. W7463 of 1657 Conversion Unit in flight
33. The Austin Production Line in 1943 (British Leyland)
34. No. 199 Squadron on parade for the Duke of Gloucester (D. Lockett)
35. NAAFI-break (J. L. Smith)
36. Trainee crew beneath a towering bomber (A. Hotchkiss)
37. The last Stirling to be delivered from Austin Motors (S. O. Woodward)
38. Chris Hanson and Donald V. Smith gaze across to Sweden (J. Helme)
39. Stirling IV EF503
40. A Stirling tows off a Horsa glider
41. A Stirling IV of 299 Squadron (D. H. Hardwick)
42. A Stirling after crashing during the Arnhem operation (J. Visser)
43. 'B-Beer' of 199 Squadron with Mandrel equipment (J. L. Smith)
44. 'Kismet III', a Stirling of 295 Squadron (E. A. Woodger)
45. A Stirling of 196 Squadron at Shepherd's Grove (J. Graf)
46. Stirlings of 620 Squadron, in flight (J. Graf)

Diagrams
1. Undercarriage assembly on Stirling
2. Performance, Mk. I N3635 (Hercules II)
3. Monthly accidents involving Stirlings
4. Accidents to Stirling bombers attributable to undercarriage trouble during landings and take-offs
5. Monthly losses on operations, Mks. I, III, IV
6. Stirling Mk. I N3636
7. Stirling Mk. I N3642
8. Stirling Mk. I N3656
9. Bases used by Stirlings in the United Kingdom
10. Maximum speeds, Mk. I, with and without turrets
11. Performance, Mk. I (Hercules XI) no dorsal turret
12. Speeds, first production Mk. I, with dorsal turret
13. Stirling, Mk. I W7451
14. Short S.36 bomber
15. Standard camouflage pattern applied to Stirling Mks I, III, IV
16. Stirling Mk. I R9250
17. Climb performance, Mk. III prototype
18. Climb performance, Mk. III second aircraft
19. Maximum level speeds, Mk. III
20. Performance, Mk. III production aircraft
21. Monthly production deliveries, Mk. I
22. Stirling Mk. III BK693
23. Stirling Mk. III LJ522
24. Monthly production deliveries, Mk. III
25. Performance, Mk. IV production aircraft
26. Performance, Mk. IV production aircraft, nose and tail turrets removed
27. Monthly production deliveries, Mks. IV and V
28. Stirling Mk. IV LJ949
29. Stirling Mk. III LJ543
30. Stirling Mk. V PJ989
31. Stirling Mk. V PJ996

1980, hbk, 1st.

 

2002, hbk

Other books on the Stirling Bomber

WWII Aircraft

 



Books/Magazines on Ebay:
[top]
 
Books on Amazon:
[please note that lack of pricing for a book does not mean book is out of stock, but that there are only secondhand copies available]
[top]