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William Stroudley

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About William Stroudley:
William Stroudley's career started in 1853 under Daniel Gooch at the Great Western Railway's works at Swindon. From there he moved first to the Great Northern Railway and then to take up the position of Works Manager at the Cowlairs Works of the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway. In 1865, he moved again - to become Locomotive & Carriage Superintendent of the Highland Railway. Based at the Lochgorm Works, Inverness, financial restrictions gave him little scope for major original design work and his major involvement was in rebuilding existing locomotives and modernising the works. This experience stood him in good stead after February 1870 when he took up the position for which he is best remembered: Locomotive & Carriage Superintendent of the London, Brighton & South Coast Railway. As at Lochgorm, his early years were spent in rebuilding existing designs while the Brighton works and running sheds were modernised. After that he could get down to the real work of original design.

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1985. Stroudley Locomotives: A Pictorial History by Brian Haresnape

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Haresnape, Brian. 'Stroudley Locomotives: A Pictorial History', first published in 1985 in Great Britain in hardback with dustjacket by Ian Allan, 128pp, ISBN 0711013918. Sorry, sold out, but click image to access prebuilt search for this title on Amazon UK
1985, Ian Allan, on behalf of Booklaw Publications, pbk

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About this book: The locomotives William Stroudley produced have been admirably catalogued by Brian Haresnape in his usual series style in this fully illustrated book (filled with black and white photographs). Fortunately for the rail enthusiast, William Stroudley's engines were much favoured by the amateur photographers of the period in which he lived and worked and as a result, there is a remarkably complete collection of photographs has survived. There can be no doubt that it was the attractive appearance of the Brighton's locomotives resplendent in their colourful livery, and the added attraction of the names they carried, which helped fire the enthusiasm of those stalwart men who carried about the large plate cameras, heavy tripods and boxes of fragile glass. The quality of their work is reflected in these pages and makes a superb tribute to Stroudley and his locomotives

Contents:
Preface
William Stroudley and the Brighton 'Mystique'
Early Influences and Progress
The Brighton Years 1870-1889

Section 1. 0-4-2T Class 18 Suburban Tank Engines
Section 2. 0-6-0 Class C Goods Engines 'Jumbos'
Section 3. 2-4-0 Class B Passenger Engines 'Belgravias'
Section 4. 0-6-0T Class A/A1/A1X Light Suburban Passenger Tank Engines 'Terriers' or 'Rooters'
Section 5. 0-4-2T Class D/D1/D1X Suburban Tank Engines 'D-Tanks'
Section 6. 2-2-2 Class B/G Express Passenger Engine 'Grosvenor'
Section 7. 0-6-0T Class E/E1/E1X/E1R (0-6-2T) Local Goods and Passenger, and Shunting Engines
Section 8. 2-2-2- Class F/G Passenger Engine 'Abergavenny'
Section 9. 0-4-2 Class D/D2 Mixed-Traffic Engines 'Lyons'
Section 10. 0-4-2 Class B Express Passenger Engines 'Richmonds'
Section 11. 2-2-2 Class G Passenger Engines 'Singles'
Section 12. 0-6-0 Class C/C1 Goods Engines 'Big Jumbos'
Section 13. 0-4-2 Class B/B1 Express Engines 'Gladstones'
Section 14. 0-6-0T Class E (special)/E2/E1 Goods Tank Engine 'Barcelona'
Section 15. 0-6-2T Class F/E3 Local Goods and Heavy Shunting Engine 'West Brighton'

Appendix 1. Preserved Locomotives
Appendix 2. Named Locomotives
Bibliography

Locomotive Photographs Included:
Front end-paper: 'Gladstone' Class B1 0-4-2 No.214 (formerly 'Gladstone') in Marsh livery
Title Page - double page spread: Class B1 0-4-2 No. 178 stands in Barcombe Station in the Marsh Umber livery with Westinghouse air brake pump on the firebox side
p5. Gladstone class 0-4-2 No. 188 Allen Sarle all decked out in flowers on its annual outing from Victoria on the LBSCR station master's and inspector's Mutual Aid Society
p6. Top. An unidentified D-Tank 0-4-2T bursts out of the Groombridge Tunnel with a train bound for Tunbridge Wells
p6. Bottom. A Stroudley 'Single' on the move heading for Newhaven
p7. Top. The enginemen of Stroudley 'Single' Class G 2-2-2 No. 332 Shanklin pose for a photograph. The continuous handrail was an R.J. Billinton addition
p7. Bottom. Class D1 0-4-2T No. 280 Grinstead stands inside Brighton station posing with its crew for the photograph. The driver Henry Musgrove is pictured with the fireman posed by the smokebox door
p8. Top. William Stroudley himself posed at Brighton standing alongside his 'Terrier' 0-6-0T No.40 Brighton after the engine had returned from the Paris Exhibition of 1878 (won a gold medal)
p8. Bottom. Gladstone Class B1 0-4-2 No. 197 (formerly Jonas Levy), seen passing Balham Intermediate signalbox with a 'Sunny South Express' down special composed of London and North Western Railway carriages. Note the Marsh boiler and retained Stroudley chimney
p9. Top. No. 681, a 'Terrier' (formerly no. 81 Beulah) in D.E. Marsh's umber brown livery
p9. Bottom. Gladstone B1 0-4-2 No. 187 seen on a race special on the Redhill avoiding line in the early 1920s showing off its Marsh chimney and Stroudley boiler with safety valves on the dome
p11. Top. Brighton works shunter Class A1X 'Terrier' No. 32635 (originally LBSCR No. 35 Morden) in Stroudley's famous livery. Was originally numbered 377s, then DS377 (departmental service). Photographed at Brighton shed on 4 March 1961. It was scrapped in 1963
p11. Bottom. An overhead view of Brighton shed at the turn of the century (1900 ish) with a mixed selection of Stroudley locomotives: D1 0-4-2T No. 235 Broadwater; B1 0-4-2 No. 197 Jonas Levy; D1 0-4-2T No. 232 Lewes; and a single behind it
p13. Top. Class A1 No. 663 Preston on the Hayling Island branch at Langston in 1903
p13. Bottom. Class A1X No. 32650 (originally No. 50 Whitechapel) with spark arrestor on the chimney top, heading a packed three-coach train at North Haylin on 2 November 1963, the day before the line closed
p14. No. 32678 (originally No. 78 Knowle) shunting a mixed train at Rolvenden on the Kent & East Sussex Railway; the 8.50 am from Headcorn to Robertsbridge on 28 November 1953
p15. Top. Single No. 334 Petworth stands at East Croydon showing off Stroudley's famous golden ochre livery. Photographed sometime around 1900
p15. 2nd photo down. The brass numberplate of No. 82 Boxhill - the 'Terrier' now preserved by the National Railway Museum. The photo highlights Stroudley's attention to detail
p15. 3rd photo down. Photo showing the cab front and whistle of No. 82 Boxhill
p15. Bottom. The front bufferbeam of Class A1 'Terrier' No. 82 Boxhill with the Brighton shedcode painted in white on the claret-coloured framing. Lining out was in yellow, black and white on the claret
p17. Top. Class E1 0-6-0T No. 127 Poitiers in goods engine colours (dark olive green with black lining)
p17. 2nd photo down. The New South Railway copied Stroudley Terrier design as seen on No. 71 at South Grafton in November 1913. It shows clear Stroudley parentage
p17. 3rd photo down. No. 329 Stephenson standing at Victoria with a five-coach train. It shows Stroudley's usage of the six-wheeled layout for his passenger locomotives
p17. Bottom. Class B1 0-4-2 No 212 Hartington standing on the turntable with some overhang at either end. Existing turntables were limited in size, which influence the wheel arrangements on Stroudley's locomotives
p18. Top. No. 320 Rastrick at Clapham Junction, an R.J. Billinton 'B2' class passenger engine which was the first class of bogied passenger engine for the LBSCR and which required all of the turntables to be enlarged. They were nicknamed Grasshoppers
p18. Bottom. Dugald Drummond was inspired by Stroudley and his first locomotive design for the North British Railway in 1875 was clearly a slightly larger copy of a 'Terrier' 0-6-0T. Seen here is No.22 built at Cowlairs in 1878
p19. Top, photo of Dugald Drummond built two 'Singles' in 1876 for the NBR, again closely following Stroudley's 1874 2-2-2 No. 326 Grosvenor. Seen here is No. 474
p19. Bottom, drawing of Drummond's version of Stroudley's 'D1' class 0-4-2T was produced in 1877 for the Clydeside services of the NBR. The drawing shown here shows the original 0-4-2T design that Drummond used to build six of the class at Cowlairs in 1877 - the one shown here is Craigendoran
p20. In the top photo shown here in SR Maunsell green livery and standing at Ford Junction station is Class D1 0-4-2T No. 2605 fitted for auto train working (additional hoses on front bufferbeam). It has a Marsh [as in D.E. Marsh], chimney and boiler
p20. Bottom. Gladstone class 0-4-2 No. 184 (formerly Carew D. Gilbert) renamed Stroudley shown at Redhill Station with a Marsh chimney and boiler. Shows coping on the boiler added by L.B. Billinton and a well-tank underneath which increased fuel capacity
p21. Table of Locomotive Classes designed by William Stroudley for the LBSCR
p22. William Stroudley pictured posing on the leading splasher of Highland Railway '18' class 2-4-0 No. 21 which was fitted with the largest type of wooden snowplough in use on the HR whilst Stroudley was still Locomotive Superintendent there
p23. Shows Stroudley's rebuilt 0-4-0T, which had originally been built at Leith by Hawthorns. Stroudley added a trailing carrying axle, an enclosed cab and small toolbox at the rear, not forgetting the elegant chimney cap, lining-out, and shaded lettering of the name Needlefield
p24. Top: a photo and drawing. of No. 57 Lochgorm, one of three locomotives rebuilt to his design on the HR (Highland Railway). It appeared after Stroudley had left and during David Jones' tenure as locomotive superintendent. The drawing shows the basic dimensions of the locomotive in side elevation
p24. Bottom - a photo of Brighton-built 2-4-0 No. 151 with 6ft driving wheels built during the Craven era - shown here in 1865 in evening sunlight. Stroudley disliked many of Craven's engines
p24. Bottom - a photo of No. 151, seen here in modified state and on West Lancashire Railway territory to which it had been sold. In between the 1865 photo above and this one, Stroudley had put his own touches to the engine such as livery, springs, dome and safety valves
p25. Top - a drawing of No. 203 Sussex, a Craven-era 'Single' of Robert Stephenson 1871/2 design rebuilt by Stroudley and the only one of its type because it was originally a domeless boiler with Adams safety valves and Stroudley rebuilt it at great cost. Does not give dimensions
p25. Bottom - a photo of No. 488 Drayton, (originally No. 205) rebuilt by Stroudley with new livery, enclosed driving wheel splashers, new domes and safety valves, etc., but retaining the same cab design. It too was originally one of the Stephenson 'Singles'
p26. The photo at the top shows No. 479 Polegate late in its career, a Nasmyth-Wilson-built 'Single' of 1867 Craven design. This photo shows the modifications Stroudley made fitting closed splashers, improved springing, new chimney and dome, enlarged sandboxes and other sundry details. The tender even in this picture still had wooden brake blocks
p26. 1st box, containing 2 elevations of 'Hove', No. 463, a Stroudley-rebuild of a Kitson-built locomotive that Craven had purchased from seeing it at the 1867 Paris Exhibition, where it had won a gold medal. Stroudley rebuilt it with his combined sandbox and splasher; modifying the upper part of the roof and cab and putting a copper cap on the chimney. The Naylor safety valves were replaced with two spring balance safety valves, which were later moved to the dome
p26. 2nd box, containing 2 side elevations of Bognor, which was originally a Kitson-built 0-4-2 saddle tank built for Craven in 1869. Stroudley gave protective sides to the cab, also replacing the safety valves and dome. He also fitted the copper-cap chimney and the Westinghouse brake. The plans here show it as No. 358 (later renumbered to 496 in 1886)
p27. At the top is a drawing showing No 96 in a black and white photograph, now called 'Inspector' and numbered 481. This was taken at some point in the period 1890-1899 and shows the engine on shed at Brighton. The engine looks radically different in this photo due to a small saloon having been added to the back of the locomotive along with an extra pair of carrying wheels, thus designating it as the only verifiable Stroudley 2-4-2T. The inspection saloon on the back was intended for use by the line's engineer on journeys checking the infrastructure
p27. At the bottom is a drawing of No. 96, a 2-4-0T supplied by Sharp, Stewart & Co. in 1869 during the Craven regime is shown here on two diagrams (both side elevations). Originally, there was a domeless boiler and little footplate protection for the enginemen, but Stroudley put a proper cab on and added the dome, something that indicates Stroudley saw value or usefulness in this engine that prevented it from being scrapped. He even named it Kemp Town, although it gained the name Hayling Island in 1874 (seen on the plans) when the 'Terrier' replacing it on the Brighton to Kemp Town service took that name

0-4-2T Class 18 Suburban Tank Engines. Introduced: 1871. Total: 2
p30. Outline drawing of 0-4-2T No.373 (originally No. 18) - one of two built by Stroudley
p31. Table showing the basic dimensions of the 0-4-2T Class 18 Suburban Tank Engines
p31. No. 467 (originally No. 27, then No. 265) - the second of the two 0-4-2Ts is seen in latterday state when working in the Horsham area

0-6-0 Class C Goods Engines. Introduced: 1871. Total: 20. 'Jumbos'
[Other Books on this topic: F.C Hambleton talks in loving detail about Stroudley and his assistant Billinton's "C" Goods Engines in Chapter VII of 'Locomotives Worth Modelling', ISBN 0852425805]
p32. A line drawing depicting the 'C' Class 0-6-0 goods engine as first designed by Stroudley with domeless boiler and Adams safety valves. There were no brakes on the engine and wooden brake shoes on the tender, which also had underhung springs
p33. Photograph of 'C' Class 0-6-0 No. 91 in dark olive green goods engine livery, originally built by Kitson & Co of Leeds in 1873. Shows a revised boiler design with dome and two spring balance safety valves
p34. Photograph showing No. 416 (originally No. 92 built by Kitson & Co. in 1874) in the evening sun at Brighton shed
p34. A table showing the basic dimensions of the class

2-4-0 Class B Passenger Engines. Introduced: 1872. Total: 6. 'Belgravias'

p35. A line drawing of 'B' Class 2-4-0 No. 202 Goodwood as first designed by Stroudley with domeless boiler and Adams safety valves. The drawing at the bottom gives all the dimensions of the locomotive in side elevation in feet and inches. The weight of the loco and of the tender empty and fully loaded is also given in tons.
p36. Top. Photograph of No. 201 Belgravia, a class B 2-4-0 outside-framed passenger engine, in original condition with a domeless boiler and Adams safety valves. It's paired with a spare Craven 23.5 ton 1,950 gallon outside-framed tender
p36. Middle. Photograph shows No. 204 Westminster at Battersea, with the Stroudley-modified boiler design whereby the Adams safety valves had been replaced and a dome had been added with spring balance valves. There are wooden brake shoes on the coupled wheels and a Westinghouse brake pump on the firebox. The polished brass bell, or gong, on the tender side is part of the electric communication passenger alarm system. No. 204 along with No. 205 Kensington, was supposed to be a rebuild of Craven-era Stephenson 'Singles' Nos 204 and 198 respectively. Bradley suggests that only the frame was re-used
p36. Bottom. Photograph of No. 202 Goodwood on shed at Brighton with its Stroudley tender (note the toolbox at the end of the tender). The Craven-era tenders were replaced by Stroudley's first outside-framed design circa 1876 improving their external appearance and matching them into the locomotive
p38. Photo of No. 602 in 1901 (formerly No. 502 and originally No. 202) Goodwood with Stroudley tender heading some Stroudley four- and six-wheeled passenger stock on a working from Brighton. The last of the class in service, it was withdrawn the in 1902
p38. A table showing the basic dimensions of the class

LBSCR/SR Class A/A1/A1X. BR Class OP. 0-6-0T Light Suburban Passenger Tank Engines called 'Terriers' or 'Rooters'. Introduced: 1872, 1911 (Class A1X is the rebuilt version). Total: 50
p39. Two drawings, side elevations, of No. 72 Fenchurch as first delivered to traffic
p40. Top. Photograph of No. 72, Fenchurch seen here outside the Preston Park paintshops with the copper steam circulating pipe across the firebox immediately in front of the cab - this feature was dispensed with very quickly in the life of the class. There is also a visible lack of Westinghouse brake equipment; and the background of the numberplate looks to be white
p40. Bottom. In this photograph, No. 70, Poplar with its lightweight Stroudley four-wheeled suburban carriages and staff are posed together. The locomotive has Westinghouse brake equipment, with wooden brake blocks and screw couplings; but the copper condensing pipe on the boiler side has been taken off by R.J. Billinton. The state of the late 19th Century LBSCR permanent way can clearly be seen in this photograph (poor with large depressions beneath parts of the track) and hence why low axle-load was necessary on the loco
p41. Top. Photograph of 'Terrier' 0-6-0T No. 41 Piccadilly, photographed in the typical condition of the class in Stroudley's and the earliest R.J. Billinton days. It is seen resting during shunting at Kemp Town and gleams with polish. It has wooden brake shoes and the copper condensing pipe on the boiler sides
p41. Bottom. Photograph showing the view from the bunker-end of 'Terrier' 0-6-0T No. 76 Hailsham picking out the wooden toolbox over the bufferbeam and the restricted size of the bunker which is barely containing the comparatively huge chunks of coal
p42. Top. No. 83 Earlswood pausing during shunting with the Westinghouse brake pump in action. One of the last of the class to be built in 1880, it had metal brake shoes and no condensing pipes on the boiler side
p42. Middle. Shown here in this photograph is Isle of Wight Central Railway No. 9, in 1899 with IWCR red oxide livery. It was the first of the four 'Terriers' which the IWCR had bought to go to the island. It's original name and number are No. 75 Blackwall
p42. Bottom. Isle of Wight Central Railway No. 10 - formerly LBSCR No. 69, Peckham was purchased in 1900 and it received a more elaborate livery and lettering on the side tanks. Both it and No. 9 mentioned immediately above remained basically unchanged except for the removal of the condensing pipes (By R.J. Billington)
p43. No. 40 Brighton was the third Terrier bought by the Isle of Wight Central Railway; it was later to become IWCR No. 11. By the time the picture was taken, coal rails had been added to the bunker and the copper cap of the Stroudley chimney had suffered losing its fine shape. The engine had had cast iron break shoes fitted and a black livery with white lining
p44. Top. Photograph of No. 40 Brighton, the third terrier purchased by the Isle of Wight Central Railway. Note the coal rails that have been added to the bunker and the copper cap on the Stroudley chimney which has suffered. Cast iron brake shoes can be seen fitted
p44. Middle. Photograph of No. 12 of the Isle of Wight Central Railway, formerly No. 84 Crowborough of the LBSCR, purchased in 1903. When this picture was taken, it had been rebuilt with a Marsh 'A1X'-type boiler with extended smokebox and a cast iron chimney (replacing Stroudley's)
p44. Bottom. Five 'terriers' were acquired from the LBSCR in 1902 by Messrs Paulin & Co., the contractors who built the High Wycombe to Marylebone line. Shown in this photograph is Bishopsgate, formerly No. 49, still in Stroudley livery
p45. Top. Photo of No. 5 Rolvenden (formerly Wapping) - one of two 'terriers' that were sent to the Kent & East Sussex Railway (formerly the Rother Valley Railway) in 1901. There were in dark blue livery with red lining out. The photo was taken shortly after purchase. The Westinghouse air brake is absent and it has wooden brake shoes
p45. Bottom. A photograph taken at Newport with No. 734 in LSWR livery after it had been loaned to the Freshwater, Yarmouth and Newport railway on the Isle of Wight in 1913 (the FYNR bought it in 1914). It is heading seven four-wheelers. The photo is doubly interesting in showing that no ballast has been used at all on the track...
p46. Top. No. 82 Boxhill is shown in this photograph at Kemp Town station in experimental livery of dark goods green with full lining-out, after having been converted to a 2-4-0T to haul new high-capacity trailer carriages (all part of an experiment with 'motor-trains'. The guard and conductor are posed alongside the engine with the fireman in the cab and the driver has his oil can at the ready! The carriages dwarf Stroudley's engine
p46. Bottom. An outline drawing from the pen of J.N. Maskelyne showing No. 82 Boxhill as converted to a 2-4-0T for use on the 'motor-trains'
p47. Top. Photograph of Class A1 'Terrier' 0-6-0T No. 79 Minories shunting its trailer car away from the wooden-built Dyke Junction stop, soon after the introduction of more 'Terrier' conversions and new motor-train carriages in 1906. The locos kept the 0-6-0T arrangement and regained condensing pipes on the boiler sides; the livery chosen being Marsh umber brown
p47. Middle. An unidentified 'Terrier' is seen in this photograph pushing a motor-train trailer and pulling a six-wheeled brake/compartment carriage. The motor-trailer has a whistle high up on the carriage end above the driving cab windows, and locomotive-type headcode discs
p47. Bottom. In a crystal-clear photograph taken on a bright sunny day in 1913 at Littlehampton station, can be seen LB&SCR 'Terrier' No. 680, Bookham. This locomotive was fitted with Marsh's motor-train gear in 1908 and in 1912 it was rebuilt receiving one of Marsh's new boilers and becoming (as did eleven other 'Terriers') one of the 'A1X' Class. The photo shows it in charge of an Arundel-Ford-Littlehampton motor-train. It has Marsh umber livery, no name, a larger smokebox, modified leading splashers without sandboxes and wingplates; condensing pipes and bunker coal rails and the original Stroudley chimney
p49. Top. Formerly No. 47, Cheapside, this photograph shows A1X rebuild No. 647. Shows plated coal-rails that extend the height of the coal bunker and increase capacity. The Stroudley dome is still present, but it has been moved forward by a few inches. The sandboxes have been moved below the footplating ahead of the leading coupled wheels and are operated by steam. A larger smokebox rests on the saddle, whilst the brakes are cast iron clasp brakes
p49. Middle. This diagram shows the weight exerted by the A1X rebuild of the 'Terrier' at various points along its length (side elevation)
p49. Bottom. Shows the 'Terrier' No. 654 Waddon that the South Eastern and Chatham Railway had bought for use on the Isle of Sheppey Light Railway. The move meant the locomotive was converted to vacuum braking. It became No. 751 in the SE & CR stock list. It's shown here in 1932 at Eastbourne shed on the 5th August still in wartime grey livery which it gained when working at Folkestone harbour. For those interested in locomotives used as stationary boilers - this photo shows No. 751 minus coupling rods and fitted with a chimney spark-arrestor so that it can be used to experiment with some pulverized fuel along with the Maunsell Class U 2-6-0 No. A629 behind it
p50. Top. Photo of No. 735, the remaining LSWR 'Terrier' just prior to 1930 with a stovepipe chimney, welded to the original Stroudley base and a cylinder lubricator on the smokebox side. It also has an unusual style of cast iron brake shoe that use the old hangers intended for the wooden ones. On the cab roof can be seen the pulleys for the motor-train operating system which it was primarily used on after No. 734 had been sold
p50. Middle. Photo of No. 682 Boxhill as the Brighton Works shunter (which it had become by then) and was painted in Umber Brown and named 'Loco Works Brighton'
p50. Bottom. By the 1920s, replacement locos were needed on the Isle of Wight as some of the secondhand Terriers were wearing out. Here, Class A1X, No. 9, Fishbourne is shown. No. 9 used to be Class A1X No. 6580 with a Marsh Chimney and was modified at Brighton Works in 1935
p51. Top. Photo of Isle of Wight 'Terrier' No. W10 Cowes showing the A1X boiler it had been fitted with in 1923 without condensing pipes; the Marsh Cast Iron Chimney; extended coal bunker, steam-operated sanding gear (but with the original sandboxes retained on the leading splasher), and fitted for motor-train working
p51. Middle. Shows No. 8, Dido (originally No. 8 Millwall), at Kinnerley on the the S&MLR railway (Shropshire and Montgomeryshire Light Railway'.
p51. Bottom. Class A1X 'Terrier' No. 2647 at Newhaven in 1936, after an intermediate repair. It's fitted for "motor-train" work and has a Drummond Pattern chimney. The photograph has been taken on the Eastern harbour branch at Newhaven, which had such light track laid on it that only it could use the branch in Southern Region and early BR days
p52. Top. Shows a side view of No. 673, Class A1X seen on 8th June 1939 still sheeted over, rusty and vandalised on the Edge Hill Light Railway, where it had stood for 21 years since the line had been closed to traffic. It was finally cut up in 1946
p52. 2nd photograph down. Shows WC&PR No. 4 (not named) attached to an open verandah-ended saloon carriage. No. 4 had Westinghouse and vacuum brakes; a Class A1X boiler and Marsh chimney and kept its 'motor-train' carriages. It has plated coal rails on the coal bunker
p52. 3rd photograph down. Photograph of K&ESR (KESR - Kent & East Sussex Railway) locomotive No. 3 Bodiam at Robertsbridge on 26th April 1947 with 2 lady passengers on the platform behind. Of interest are the built-up coal bunker with one small coal rail, an original type combined sandbox and the retained splashers. It has vacuum braking and a Stroudley chimney on top
p52. Bottom. In September 1949, hurrying along with a two-coach Havant to Hayling Island train, Class A1X 'Terrier' No. 2661 (originally LBSCR No. 61 Sutton) can be seen in this photo in plain black livery adopted by the SR during World War 2 with the yellow and green 'sunshine'-style lettering for the word 'Southern' on the side tanks
p53. An interesting photo is on page 53, showing 'Terrier' No. 5, Stroudley in storage in 1950 at Swindon after a successful life serving the Weston, Clevedon and Portishead Railway and then the GWR when the WC&PR was liquidated. The GWR might be seen as an unlikely and unwilling owner of Stroudley 'Terrier's, but Portishead served as shed pilot at Newton Abbot
Class 4575 2-6-2T No. 4581 and 'Hall' Class 4-6-0 No. 7913 Little Wyrley Hall can be seen either end of the 'Terrier'
p54. TABLE: of Class A1/A1X 'Terriers' used on the Isle of Wight
p55. Top. Photo of Class A1X No. 32677 at Hayling Island on 3rd September 1949 in Bulleid malachite green livery with Stroudley chimney
p55. Bottom. Photo of A1X locomotive No. 32635 at Brighton shed on 17th September 1960, after it had been returned to Southern Region general stock following the closure of Brighton works (where it had been works shunter No 380s). Of interest is that it still carries 'Brighton Works' on the side
p56. Top. Lancing Carriage Works Service Stock No. DS680 in plain black without BR emblems at Lancing. This used to be the SE&CR 'Terrier' No. 751. Note the Class A1 smokebox and wingplates; 'A1X'-type boiler and Drummond chimney. This locomotive is on display at the Canada National Railway Museum
p56. Bottom. Photo of No. 32636 (originally No. 72 Fenchurch) in a fresh coat of lined black at Newhaven shed. Preserved (sold in 1964 to the Bluebell Railway)
p57. Table of Class A1/A1X 'Terriers' sold out of service by the LBSCR/SR/BR for further use whilst still in running order (excluding the Isle of Wight)
p59. Photo at Newhaven of Class A1X 'Terrier' No. 32670 (previously K&ESR (KESR, Kent & East Sussex Railway) No. 3. Bodiam) in use as a harbour area shunter. Visible in this side view are the distinctive high coal bunker and single coal rail with the sandboxes retained on the leading splashers. It carries the second version of the BR Lion and Wheel crest with the 'condensed' style numerals that BR introduced for its diesel shunters. Has the power classification 'OP' above the numerals
p59. TABLE: showing basic dimensions of the class of LBSCR/SR Class A/A1/A1X as first introduced
p59. TABLE: showing the dimensions of the class A1X survivors under BR

p60. LBSCR Class D, later D1/D1X* SR/Class D1 BR Class 2P. 0-4-2T Suburban Tank Engines Introduced 1873, 1910. 'D-Tanks'. Introduced: 1873, 1910 (Rebuilt in 1910 with a larger boiler by D. E. Marsh)
p60. Side elevation drawing of No. 1 Sydenham as first delivered without the Westinghouse brake and showing the original angular treatment to the bunker top-plate and wooden brake shoes. The drawing at the bottom of the page gives all the main dimensions of the engine in feet and inches
p61. Top. Side view of Class D 0-4-2T No. 20 Carshalton as delivered from Brighton in July 1875 and pictured here in brand new condition in matt grey workshop paint lined and lettered for photographic purposes prior to receiving Stroudley's golden ochre livery. It does not have a Westinghouse brake; has plain three link couplings and wooden brake blocks
p61. Middle. Photograph of side view of No. 3 Battersea taken at Battersea shed showing the engine after Stroudley had fitted the Westinghouse brake to it with the pump located on the cabside. This photo has a good view of the angular treatment of the bunker top-plate at the rear. On later locomotives, Stroudley changed it to a flowing curve
p61. Bottom. Photo of No. 255 Willingdon with its crew (posed) at Brighton shed yard. Has a Westinghouse brake, cast iron brake shoes, and screw link couplings. Stroudley has also had false spokes painted over the balance weights of the coupled wheels. On locomotives painted golden ochre (like this one), the coupling rods were painted in a claret colour leaving the ends as polished metal
p62. Shows a photo of No. 26, Hartfield - with the revised flowing curve to the coal bunker top-plate behind the cab. The coal has been piled high, some of which will fall off mid-journey due to the lack of coal rails. The driver's bag is also hanging from a lamp iron, which is a nice and typical touch. The wooden brakes can be clearly seen and the overhang of the cab over the rear set of wheels seems quite excessive from this angle
p63. Side view photo of Neilson-built 'D-Tank' No. 245 Withdean at East Croydon in c.1908 with the driver facing away from the camera into the cab. The sloping walkway down to the platform behind the locomotive can be seen to this day. The livery is golden ochre
p64. Top. Photo of No. 20, Carshalton as a reboilered version (was reboilered by R. J. Billinton in 1892). It's had injectors and cold-feed fitted, but the condensing pipes have been removed. In this photo, No. 20 has a sort of manhole cover over the firebox with the dome moved forward. Whilst it retains wooden brake blocks, it now has the Westinghouse brake and screw link couplings
p64. Bottom. Side elevation drawing of No. 239 Patcham as first modified with the Billinton boiler in 1894
p66. Top. B&W photo of Class D1 0-4-2T No. 239 Patcham as modified by R. J. Billinton with the second boiler design, cold feed and injectors. This engine was one of only two of the class to which he gave a continuous handrail round the smokebox and along the boiler. Note the lack of condensing pipes
p66. Middle. Shows D1 0-4-2T No. 361 in an experimental umber brown, as applied in May 1905 by D. E. Marsh in a change of livery. Lining-out was done in orange, black and yellow with the name in gold leaf, shaded black. This engine is the only example of a D-tank to retain its name once under the new livery - other engines had their names replaced by LB&SCR
p66. Bottom. B&W photo showing D-tank No. 627 fresh from the Brighton paintshop in July 1909 now resplendent in the umber brown Marsh livery, white cab roof and L&B painted in large letters on the side. It is sandwiched between two driving trailer cars also in umber brown and cream with white roofs. D-tanks 605, 284 and 290 were similarly painted
p67. Shows D. E. Marsh's new boiler design, here on D-tank No. 271, which had its boiler replaced with the new design in December 1910. It has a large closed dome (here smaller than the earlier versions) and modified Ramsbottom safety valves in a flared casing (earlier casings were plain). The Stroudley chimney was retained if it was still in good condition and the whistle was placed high on the cab roof; whilst some engines had the condensing pipes removed. Note the air reservoir added below the coal bunker onto the main frames
p68. Top. Photo of 0-4-2T, No. 237 with the Marsh chimney in place (cast iron); something that was installed on an engine when the Stroudley engine was worn out. This picture also shows the earlier larger Marsh dome and the later flared casing containing the safety valves. The engine appears to be hauling 10 coaches...
p68. Middle. Photo of Class D1X 0-4-2T No. 79A (originally Carshalton), the only engine to be rebuilt by Marsh in 1910 with a larger, high-pitched boiler, a circular smokebox and saddle, a small dome, shorter chimney and raised cab roof. The coal bunker has been enlarged with four coal rails; but water capacity remains the same. This rebuild was a failure due to the higher centre of gravity and consequent rough riding at moderate speed, but that didn't stop the engine surviving in service until 1933
p68. Bottom. B&W photo of D-Tank No. 623 on the fast line, heading cab first up to London Bridge at Honor Oak Park Station with 5 coaches - six-wheeled and bogie stock - in tow. The extended coal bunker must have considerably reduced visibility from the cab. Taken in the summer time, the station has what looks to be classic victorian gas lamps(?) and the same two staircases down to the London-bound and southbound platforms as exist today. Interestingly, the southbound platform is the one with the canopy on (today there is only a bus shelter type construction...); and not the London-bound platform as is the case today. There's no third-rail and in the background behind the road bridge (which carries the station building) there's a man clearly walking across the tracks and a signalbox with steps up to the control room visible
p69. Top. B&W photo of Class D1 0-4-2T No. B248 standing at Dorking North, in SR Maunsell green livery in what looks to be the late 1920s. When this engine was damaged in an accident in 1919 at Streatham Junction, new rectangular side tanks were built making it unique
p69. Bottom. BEFORE OVERHAUL. B&W photo of D-Tank No. B612 prior to June 1929 with original Stroudley chimney, Marsh boiler, dome and Ramsbottom safety valves, whistle on cab roof, no condensing pipes; injectors and cold feed, dual-brake fitted (Westinghouse and vacuum) and three coal rails added to the bunker. It illustrates well the diversity of features on a D-Tank as part of the Southern Railway fleet
p70. Top. AFTER OVERHAUL! No. B612, rear and side view, fresh from overhaul at Brighton works on June 30, 1929. The Stroudley chimney has been replaced by a Marsh one and the brakes are now vacuum only. An 1892-style Billinton boiler has been installed with a forward-sited dome and safety valves; also, dramatically, the coal bunker has been reduced in size and capacity due to the engine being reemployed on the Axminster to Lyme Regis branch with tight restrictions on the axle-loading. It has a steam heating hose for colder weather and carries Maunsell green livery with black and white lining. There's now also an oval numberplate between the two cab windows
p70. 2nd photo down. Class D1 0-4-2T No. B629 seen at West Brompton on April 21, 1932 heading the only passenger service that D-Tanks were now employed on: the shuttle service between Clapham Junction and Kensington Addison Road. The carriages in this picture are three exLBSCR at the front and at the rear two exLSWR; all heading for Clapham Junction
p70. 3rd photo down. Side view of No. 2615, a motor-train fitted D-tank in the 1930s in full SR passenger green livery and lining out with large numerals and expanded lettering of the Maunsell livery. It has plated coal rails on the top of the bunker, typical Marsh boiler mountings and trimmings and retains the condensing pipes from smokebox to tank
p70. Bottom. No. 2356 - side and rear view at Bognor shed in 1935 showing in detail the expanded coal bunker and the motor-train fittings with vacuum and Westinghouse air brakes for train working. On the rear of the bunker are chrome yellow numerals shaded black, sitting on a Maunsell green livery
p71. Top. No. 2252 in July 1941 in an official wartime photograph with fire-fighting pumps fitted to the rear of the coal bunker (replacing the Stroudley toolbox, traditionally fixed there) and a Drummond-style chimney. The engine is in unlined Maunsell green with Bulleid-style lettering on the tankside and carries water hoses around the front of the engine. Note the pleated oilcloth blackout curtain in the cab doorway. The feed pumps have been replaced by Ashford-pattern injectors
p71. Middle. Shown here at Nine Elms in June 1946 is No. 2286 looking quite weathered and worn in plain black livery.
p71. Bottom. Photo of County Mental Hospital Whittingham No. 1, the last Class D1 0-4-2T to remain in active service, working on the Whittingham Light Railway (Preston), until it wore out!
It had been purchase by Lancashire County Council in 1948, formerly No. 2357
p72. Top table: Dimensions of the Marsh boilered version of the D-Class, as first introduced
p72. Bottom left table: The basic dimensions of the D-Class, as first introduced
p72. Bottom right table: Dimensions of No. 79A, rebuilt by Marsh with a larger boiler

p73. LBSCR Class B, later Class G 2-2-2 Express Passenger Engine. Introduced: 1874. Total: 1
p73. Drawing and schematic drawing showing No. 151 Grosvenor, Stroudley's unique 6ft 9 inch single-driving wheel express passenger engine, as first fitted with two large wooden brake shoes working on the driving and trailing wheels and a plain three link coupling. A Craven-style tender was first attached
p74. Top. Shows the official photograph of the engine (side view) signed by William Stroudley. The engine now had the following attributes:
i. A new tender - an outside-framed underhung-springing Stroudley type
ii. A Westinghouse brake with pump on the firebox side
iii. Wooden brake blocks (no change)
iv. A plain three-link front coupling
v. Stroudley's patent speed recorder under the running plate (belt and pulley arrangement)
p74. Bottom. Side view of the engine (still 'Grosvenor') now renumbered as No. 326 at Battersea shed, with its new inside-framed tender (this is the 3rd tender it had been fitted with). This new tender made the engine look like a 'big' engine, something capable of long distance mainline performance. The new tender's wheels were the same diameter as the engine's non-driving wheels (4ft 6in.). Note that it now has 2 clasp-type cast iron brake shoes on each of the driving wheels
p75. Photo of Grosvenor in 1901 attached to a Royal Train carriage and carrying whitewashed coal! It's carrying a special headcode and the Prince of Wales' feathers
p75. TABLE
giving the basic dimensions of the locomotive as first introduced

p76. LBSCR Class E, later Class E1/E1X* SR/BR Class E1, E1R. 0-6-0T Local Goods and Shunting Engines Introduced 1874 (78), 1911* (1), 1927 (10 introduced). Known as E-Tanks
p76. Side elevation drawing of No. 97. Honfleur in original Stroudley condition with wooden brake blocks on each wheel and no Westinghouse brake for train-working. It had plain three link couplings and lever-operated reverse. When new, each engine had the usual Stroudley features of condensing pipes and feed pumps. Includes a scale drawing (side elevation) of the engine
p77. Top. Black and white photograph of E-Tank No. 133 Picardy built in 1978 at Battersea. It is in dark olive green goods engine livery with black lining bands and is in Stroudley's original state without any Westinghouse brake and wooden brake blocks
p77. Middle. This photo shows No. 145 in golden ochre passenger livery and with a Westinghouse brake, which is unusual because E-Tanks were goods engines and the ride was rough on them. However, in 1880, an increase in traffic in the London suburbs led to a shortage of engine and E-Tanks had to help out with passenger traffic. This was not popular with the passengers, who complained about the rough ride
p77. Bottom - shows a Stroudley-designed water column and new wooden water butt with E-Tank No. 135, Foligno standing behind, driver in the cab. The photographer has captured the back of the engine, showing the detail of the bunker end of an E-Tank, which has the typical Stroudley toolbox with lamp fixed on the back. The bunker top plate is curved - a change that Stroudley soon actioned to replace the previous angular shape. No. 135 is in goods engine livery and with an 1892-style Billinton replacement boiler with the dome moved forward
p78. Shows a photograph of No. 163 Southwick, a Class E1 0-6-0Ts at New Cross Gate - a typical condition Stroudley-cum-Billinton 'E-tank' as first built. When Stroudley died, Billinton built six more of this class with the same basic dimensions, but slightly altered in appearance:
1. Boiler and smokebox were to Billinton's own design
2. Wheels made of cast steel with crescent-shaped balancing weights
3. Steam-powered sanding gear
4. Sandboxes located below the footplate and directed to the centre driving wheel
5. Westinghouse airbrake fitted
6. The six engines had goods engine livery, but the black lining bands had ultra fine red lines each side to signify that these engines were Westinghouse-braked for passenger service
7. In the photo, No. 163 shows the dome moved further forward
8. In the photo, No. 163 had a manhole cover placed over the firebox top with a whistle mounted on it
9. In the photo, No. 163 had a changed arrangement for the smokebox and leading splasher
10. In the photo, No. 163 shows a Derby-inspired cast iron tapered design for Billinton's chimney
11. In the photo, No. 163. shows injectors used in place of feed pumps with no condensing arrangement
p79. Top. Shows the boiler replacement that many D- and E-Tanks received from 1906 onwards, which had been designed by D. E. Marsh. The first examples as shown here with No. 129, had a very tall dome casing and a plain GNR-type safety valve casing. The copper-capped Stroudley chimney was usually retained if its condition was sound. Here, No. 129 is in Marsh black with red lining goods engine livery, polished condensing pipes and LB&SCR initials in gold, shaded red on the sides of the tank. There is a highly polished whistle in a new position on the cab roof and the engine has wooden brake blocks with Westinghouse brakes. Its name 'Alencon' has been removed
p79. Middle. Photo of 'E-Tank', No. 137 (previously Dijon) reboilered with the later Marsh boiler with a lower dome casing and flared safety valve casing. It carries Marsh's umber brown livery with white cab roof; no number plates and 'L B S C' lettered on the side in a larger font than formerly used. It has cast-iron brake blocks and coal rails have been added to the bunker. The feed pumps and condensing pipes have been retained
p79. Bottom - photo of the completely rebuilt 'E-tank' No. 89 (by D. E. Marsh) with a new boiler, new square-topped side tanks, new bunker and cab. The new boiler was the same as used on theh Class D1X rebuild of six months earlier. It was high pitched and rested on on a smokebox saddle. The photo shows that the Stroudley leading splashers and sandboxes had been retained with the sanding operated by steam. The roof of the cab was of clerestory design with ventilators giving an overall elegant look, particularly in view of the well-proportioned chimney, dome and safety valve casing. No. 89 was classified henceforth as 'E1X' and can be seen here in black livery with red lining (although this is a black and white photo). No other examples of this engine were built and it was retro-converted by the Southern Region in 1930
p80. Top photograph - shows Class E1 No. 99, which was put into service stock as Loco Dep.t Brighton in March 1909 with black livery and red lining. Its job was to move dead locomotives into and back from Brighton Works and the nearby shed and yards. It can be seen here with 'D-Tank' No. 271. No. 99 has a Billinton replacement boiler of the latter type with the dome moved backward; no condensing pipes and no Westinghouse brake
p81. Top photograph: Class E1 0-6-0T No. 606 (originally No. 105 Guernsey when built in 1876) on 12th March 1920 at Clapham Junction station with a train of four-wheelers off the West London Extension Railway. Has plated bunker coal rails
p81. Bottom photo. No. 111, side view, showing its Departmental letting (just like No. 99) 'Loco Dept New Cross', but with larger shaded characters. Fitted with a Westinghouse brake, this loco retained the wooden brake block
p82. Top - No.697 looking quite weathered in black livery with a Marsh boiler, Stroudley chimney and original bunker. The condensing pipes and feed pumps have been removed; and injectors have been fitted
p82. 2nd photo down - Just showing the variety of 'E-Tank' fittings and fixtures by the end of the LBSCR period, No. 694 shows a Marsh cast-iron chimney, but has a pre-Marsh boiler, condensing pipes and feed pumps; whilst the bunker has three coal rails, no plated backing and has steam operated sanding gear
p82. 3rd photo down - No. 608 in what is thought to be an early Southern Region period photograph because it has a small 'B' prefix painted above the number. It has Marsh boiler, fittings and the condensing pipes all present. Marsh's black livery led to the Class E1s being called 'Black Tanks'
p83. Top photograph - Isle of Wight No. 1 Medina in Maunsell's green livery, with black and white lining and a neat brass nameplate with red background. This engine was originally No. 136, Brindisi. This engine was one of four sent to the Isle of Wight in 1932/3 and was fitted with a Drummond chimney at Eastleigh. It had an injector-fed Marsh boiler and no condensing pipes, with a Westinghouse brake used for train working
p83. Middle - some surplus 'E-Tanks' were sold into industrial use and B163 seen here (originally No. 163 Southwick) was bought by the Ashington Colliery and given the new designation of A. C. Co. Ltd, No. 4. This engine was originally built in 1891 by R. J. Billinton with the later Billinton boiler, March chimney and coal rails on the bunker. The harsh Northumbrian climate had led the new owners to fit wooden doors onto the cab. The driver can be seen through the cab entrance smiling towards the camera
p83. The bottom photo shows No. 2096 (previously No. 96) outside Eastleigh having had work done to correct wheel balancing, which had made the engine ride roughly. A vacuum brake had been fitted and has an injector rather than a feed pump. The unusual thing here is that it has a Drummond chimney and usually rebuilds were given Marsh designs.
This engine is one of ten surplus 'E-Tanks', which had found a new life with extended frames, a Maunsell 'N' class pony truck at the rear and a new Ashford-style bunker and cab providing mixed-traffic services in the West Country. They had restricted axle-loadings, but larger coal and water capacity and the work to modify them was done at Brighton Works in 1927-29. They were all given Maunsell's green passenger livery and all had Marsh-type boilers
p84. TABLE OF THE TEN 'E-TANK' REBUILDS: 94, 95, 96, 99, 103, 104, 105, 108, 124, 135
p84. Top photograph: 1948/9 shows No. 3 Ryde filling up her tanks with water at Ventnor West, Isle of Wight, and showing an early British Railways livery scheme with green-shaded Southern Region type lettering. No. 3 was scrapped in 1959
p84. Bottom photograph: Shows Class E1R 0-6-2T No. 2096 heading a mixed passenger and goods train at Halwill Junction. No. 2096 sports a Drummond chimney and Maunsell cab and has clearly had modifications to its vacuum standpipe, steam-heating hose and hooked-up screw link coupling
p85. Top left photograph: No. s 2153, ('S' stands for Southern Region) is seen here shunting a Portsmouth 4-COR electric set, No. 3069. It is in the earliest British Railways style in black livery with yellow and green lettering and numberals. It has dual vacuum and Westinghouse brakes fitted and plated coal-rails on the bunder top and Marsh boiler with injectors
p85. Top right photograph: Shows No. 110 Burgundy, the 100th locomotive built by Stroudley in service to the Cannock and Rugeley Colliery Co., in April 1927, sporting a new and awkward-looking chimney and new boiler; and designated CRC No. 9. This photograph dates to July 1961 and shows brass lettering and surrounds to the small extra cab windows and 'NCB' under the nameplate (National Coal Board). The last 'E-Tank' in service was withdrawn this very month, so No. 9 had outlived its class in industrial service
p86. TABLE: The basic dimensions of the Class E1R, 0-6-2Ts converted by R. E. L. Maunsell
p86. TABLE: The basic dimensions of the Class E, as first introduced
p86. TABLE: The basic dimensions of the Class E1X No. 89, as rebuilt by Marsh

p87. LBSCR Class F, later Class G 2-2-2 Passenger Engine, Introduced 187
7. Total: 1. 'Abergavenny'
p87. Drawing of Stroudley's second and smaller 'Single', originally Class F, No. 325 Abergavenny in its original form with an outside-framed Stroudley tender and wooden brake blocks, and post-addition of the Westinghouse brake in 1880. The bottom of the two drawings has the dimensions of the engine and tender in feet and inches
p88-89. Black and white photograph across both pages showing Abergavenny on shed at Brighton next to 'D-Tank' No. 368 Baynards. The tender is a later inside-framed Stroudley version. Decorative details to note here are the single painted panel on the side of the tender rather than the normal two panel version; and the engine itself has the number painted on the bufferbeam. Whilst the engine had wooden brake blocks its entire life, the later tender had the clasp-type cast iron brakes
p89. TABLE: The basic dimensions of the Class F as first introduced

p90. LBSCR Class D, later Class D2 0-4-2 Mixed Traffic Engines. Introduced 1876. Total: 14. 'Lyons'
p90. Two drawings of 'Lyons', class 0-4-2 No. 306 Naples, which illustrates the original arrangement of the reversing rod which passed beneath the firebox cladding. On Nos. 308-313 it was outside the cleading. There are wooden brake blocks and plain three-link front coupling. The lower drawing shows the dimensions of the engine in feet and inches
p91. Top photograph shows the actual 'Naples' engine, No. 306., attached to a Craven tender and both have wooden brake blocks, with the engine possessing the Westinghouse brake; the livery is Stroudley's golden ochre
p91. Lower photograph - this is of No. 304, 'Nice', side elevation, showing the Westinghouse pump and Craven tender, with wooden blocks on all wheels
p92. TABLE: The basic dimensions of the 'D2' class, as first introduced
p92. Photographs of No. 312 Albion on a turntable with an inside-framed tender. The turntable is small reflecting the restriction Stroudley put upon the length of all his locomotives

p93. LBSCR Class B, 0-4-2 Express Passenger Engine. Introduced: 1878. Total: 6. 'Richmonds'
Drawing (side elevation, no dimensions) of the LBSCR Class B, No. 208. The class was born from the idea of using an 0-4-2 layout with larger-coupled wheels.
p93. Photograph of No. 210 standing on the turntable at the old 1857 Lewes station in the 1880s. The locomotive is impeccably painted and spotlessly clean. Its original outside-framed tender is just visible behind the locomotive
p94. TABLE. The basic dimensions of the 'Richmond' Class as first introduced
p94. Photograph of No. 608 (originally 208), Richmond at Eastbourne in the early Edwardian period looking handsome with its inside-framed tender. Visible is the fact that the smokebox is slightly larger in diameter than the boiler; whilst the chimney is shorter than on other Stroudley classes because of the high pitch of the boiler

p95. LBSCR Class G, 2-2-2 Passenger Engines. Introduced: 1880. Total: 24. 'Singles'
p95. Two drawings, side elevations, of No. 328, 'Sutherland' in standard Stroudley condition, with Westinghouse brake, cast iron brake shoes, and large inside-framed tender. The lower drawing has dimensions of both locomotive and tender in feet and inches
p96. Top photograph of No. 328 Sutherland at East Croydon Station around 1900. These engines stayed in Stroudley's golden ochre livery for the whole of their lives
p96. Bottom photograph: No. 341 Parkhurst showing the vacuum brake it had fitted in 1892 for train working, in addition to the Westinghouse air brake. This engine needed this arrangement due to being stationed at Portsmouth and working London and South Western Railway stock through trains, which were vacuum braked. Note also the prominent standpipe on the front bufferbeam making the engine easily recognizable. Parkhurst's two crew pose proudly on the engine in this photograph taken at Hove.
p97. Top photograph - No. 344, Hurstmonceaux, taken at Hove whilst being prepared for the 'right-away'. Note the safety valves have been lifted
p97. Lower photograph - shows No. 327 Imberhorne showing a continuous handrail right round the engine from firebox to smokebox front and back - a modification made by R. J. Billinton
p98. TABLE. The basic dimensions of the class as first introduced
p98. Photograph of No. 349 Albany showing a clear side view of the engine in all its glory, cleaned and polished despite the patches of bare metal where the heat from the inside of the firebox has burned away the paint. Note the characteristic raked-back double footstep on the end of the inside-framed tender nearest the locomotive

p99. LBSCR Class C, later Class C1 0-6-0 Goods Engines. Introduced: 1882. Total: 12. 'Jumbos'
p99. Two drawings, both side elevations of the large Class C1 0-6-0 goods engine No. 429, part of the second batch built with the reversing rod outside the firebox cladding. Clasp-type cast iron brake shoes act upon the centre driving and rear-coupled wheels only
p100. Top photograph shows No. 431 in dark olive green livery with fine red lines added to the black lining bands and an outside-framed tender with underhung springs behind
p100. Lower photograph shows No. 423 with gilt numerals on a red bufferbeam (something Marsh applied to his engines) and in goods green livery coupled to an inside-framed tender. The author suspects (asking the question) - was this the only tender to carry the goods green livery? The fireman can be seen on the tender refilling the tender
p101. Top photograph (startlingly clear) shows No. 421 - the first of the class built in 1882 - at Fratton in 1901, in much the same condition as when new. The photo shows clearly the heavy balance weights in the coupled-wheels; and an outside-framed tender on the back
p101. Lower photograph shows No. 7 - Class C1 0-6-0 goods engine No. 428 sold out of service to the Stratford-on-Avon & Midland Junction Railway upon withdrawal in 1919 from the LBSCR. Before transfer to its new owners, it was serviced at the Brighton works receiving injectors and vacuum braking to replace the feed pumps and Westinghouse air brake; also receiving the crimson lake, yellow and black-lined SA&MJR livery. The photo here shows the engine, still No. 7, after absorption by the LMSR (London, Midland and Scottish Railway) in 1923. The outside-framed tender in the picture has raised coping to increase its coal capacity.
No. 7 was No. 2303 under LMSR ownership, but this number was never applied to it; nor was the LMSR livery
p102. TABLE. The basic dimensions of the class as first introduced

p103. LBSCR Class B, later Class B1 0-4-2 Express Passenger Engines. Introduced: 1884. Total: 36. 'Gladstones'
p103. Two drawings, side elevations, of No. 214 Gladstone, William Stroudley's famous Gladstone class express passenger engine. The lower drawing shows the engine and tender's dimensions in feet and inches
p104. Top photograph - shows No. 199 'Samuel Laing', decorated with 'Prince of Wales feathers' and special headcode. The engine's crew are posed in the photograph alongside the tender; all part of preparing the engine for Royal train duties, with whitewashed coal in the tender
p104. Middle photograph - At New Cross Gate can be seen No. 175 Hayling showing the huge, but shapely leading splasher and sandbox combined, and the generously proportioned generously proportioned copper-capped chimney. Hayling was dual-braked, and the extra pipework is clearly visible. Note the huge lumps of coal in the tender, which the fireman would have needed tremendous physical effort to break up
p104. Bottom photograph - Shows No. 215 Salisbury with the driver posed on the footplate - and - yet more huge lumps of coal on the tender. The photo is useful for illustrating the weak point of the inside-framed Stroudley tender, which is the lack of side rails and side copings, which led to coal falling off onto the track and trackside
p106. The photograph at the top shows No. 189, Edward Blount, the engine which had been sent to the 1889 Paris Exhibition. The engine won a gold medal and this honour was painted on the leading splasher underneath the name. In 1907, Marsh chose the engine to trial Hammond's Patent Air-heating apparatus and this photograph shows this equipment mounted on the front of the engine, with original Stroudley chimney
F. C. Hambleton's book 'Locomotives Worth Modelling' looks at Edward Blount in some detail from pages 15 - 24; it is illustrated with scale diagrams of the side elevation of the loco and tender; front elevation; cab layout; balanced cranks; chimney; cylinder lubricator; safety valve; whistle; whistle handle; and the buffer. A table gives all the useful dimensions.
p106. The lower photograph shows No. 196, Ralph L. Lopes in the early 1900s with continuous handrail and battered golden ochre livery; battered, yet highly polished by the enginemen
p107. The top photo shows No. 194 after the application of the Marsh umber livery and the loss of its name Bickersteth, not forgetting the application of a messy jumble of the initials LB&SCR on the splashers. The Stroudley-style cabside numberplate had been retained and initial LB & SCR painted on the side of the tender also. The engine retains a Stroudley-type boiler and chimney and carries both vacuum and Westinghouse air brakes. Note Billinton's continuous handrail
p107. Lower photograph: No. 214 Gladstone was one of a few engines that retained their names when Marsh repainted the engines. Painted numerals have replaced the cabside plates. The engine now carries a Marsh boiler with closed dome and Ramsbottom safety valves over the firebox casing in a flared casing. The whistle has been resited to the cab roof; and there is a reverse curve to the trailing wheel splasher where it joins the cab (No. 214 is the only engine of the class that had this)
p108. Top photograph shows No. 190 - Arthur Otway - at Battersea shed; it is another of the locos that retained its name; and has a Marsh cast iron chimney and Marsh boiler. The tender coping has been added by Lawson Billinton in later LBSCR days. The cab front and rear trailing wheel layouts have been simplified; and a larger Westinghouse pump has been fitted
p108. The bottom photograph shows No. 192 on 17 May 1924 at the same location - Battersea Shed. As opposed to No. 190, No. 192 still carries it's Stroudley chimney; and has a Billinton boiler. The chimney means the engine retains its distinctive Stroudley-look. However, No. 192 has lost its 'Jacomb Hood' name
p109. Carrying on with the Battersea shed theme, this photograph is from May 1927, four years and five months after the grouping of the L&SWR; the LBSCR and the SE&CR into the Southern Region. There is now a small SR oval standard numberplate on the cabside and an engine number in SR style numerals under the 'LBSC' on the tender. The engine has a larger Westinghouse pump
p110. A classic photograph of No. 198 leaving Victoria Station, London in Maunsell's passenger green livery and complete with Billinton and Marsh alterations
p110. TABLE. The basic dimensions of the class as first introduced

p111. LBSCR Class E (special) later Class E2, E1 0-6-0T Goods Tank Engine (special duties). Introduced: 1884. Total: 1. 'Barcelona'
p111. A side elevation drawing showing No. 157, 'Barcelona' built specially for use on the 'Cuckoo' line, between Eastbourne and Tunbridge Wells. It has larger leading sandboxes, no handrail on the boiler side and larger side tanks than on the standard 'E-Tank'. It has a Westinghouse brake fitted and cast-iron shoes acting on the leading edge of the coupled wheels only
p112. TABLE. The basic dimensions of the class as first introduced
p112. Photograph of the engine in dark oliver green livery with black bands and fine red-lining out as a goods engine (it was better at goods duties than passenger). The photo shows the large sized side tanks, condensing pipes, lack of boiler handrail and addition of a small handrail on the tank front

p113. LBSCR Class F, later Class E3 0-6-2T. Local Goods and Heavy Shunting Engine. Introduced: 1891. Total: 1
p113. Small side elevation drawing of the engine Class F 0-6-2T radial goods engine No. 158 West Brighton, designed by William Stroudley and built posthumously by R. J. Billinton in 1891. Bilinton changed the design and added a cast iron tapered chimney and the longer bunker (with the toolbox resited in the cab) to allow greater water and coal capacity. It did not have a Westinghouse brake, just steam braking using all three coupled wheels; with plain three link couplings
p113. Photograph shows the engine c.1909-10 with Marsh goods engine black livery and very fine red lining-out with the loss of its name in favour of the initials LB&SCR. Notable is the change of the chimney - the engine now ports Stroudley's copper-cap type, producing a very Stroudley appearance, which the great man had originally intended...
p114. Shows the engine in 1912, at last carrying a Westinghouse brake. During this time, it was used for various local passenger train duties, whilst based at St. Leonard's shed. Screw-link couplings have also been fitted
p114. TABLE. The basic dimensions of the class as first introduced

Appendix 1. Preserved Locomotives
p115. Top photograph shows No. 214. Gladstone in Battersea shed yard on 21 May 1927 in the superb exhibition finish applied for £140 by the Southern Region. The engine is now in the NRM (National Railway Museum) ownership
p115. Lower photograph - shows 'Terrier' No. 82 Boxhill on exhibition at Dorking North Station in 1947 adjacent to Bulleid's electric locomotive No. CC2. Restored by the SR to Class A1 LBSCR condition, this engine is in NRM ownership
p116. No. 32655, a class A1X 'Terrier' in 1960 repainted into Stroudley livery as No. 55 'Stepney', an engine famous with the public for that very reason. In this photo, it is double-heading near Freshfield on 17th October 1964 with Billinton's Class E4 0-6-2T No. 473 Birch Grove on the 14.55 from Sheffield Park to Horsted Keynes service on the Bluebell Railway, which had purchased both locomotives
p117. Class A1X 'Terrier' No. 3 Bodiam can be seen in the top photograph on the Kent and East Sussex Railway celebrating her centenary on 4th November 1972. She was originally called No. 70 Poplar, but has long been associated with the K&ESR (KESR, Kent & East Sussex Railway), having been bought from the LBSCR in 1901. The Mayor of Tenterden and the Chairman of the K&ESR can bee seen peering out from the footplate
p117. On 26th September 1976, yet another locomotive celebrated its centenary on the K&ESR - No. 10 Sutton, a Class A1X, which had been No. 32650 in British Rail ownership; and No. 50 Whitechapel under the LBSCR. It now has the number 61 and is called 'Sutton'. In this photo, the loco approaches Rolvenden with an afternoon train, strangely coupled to a former GWR diesel railcar No. 20, which had been added to provide extra seating!
p118. Class A1X 'Terrier' No. 72 Fenchurch struggles to grip the rails on the way up to Tenterden town in this full page photo. The Bluebell Railway had lent this engine to the K&ESR; the date 19th September 1981, when it can be seen double-heading with 'USA' class 0-6-0T No. 22 'Maunsell' on the heavily loaded 13.10 from Wittersham Road
p119. A small photo at the top of the page showing Class A1X 'Terrier' No W8 Fishbourne in Maunsell's green livery at Haven Street on the Isle of Wight. It was originally No. 46 Newington
p119. No. 40 Brighton, a Stroudley 'Terrier' standing alongside an ex-SNCF 0-6-0 No. 030 C841 at the Canadian Railway Museum in Montreal

 

The LBSCR

Early Steam Engines

Southern Steam

Books about Southern Railways

0-6-0 Steam Engines

Isle of Wight Railway

British Rail in the Early Years

Maunsell

Chief Mechanical Engineers (CMEs)

Eastleigh Steam

Industrial Locomotives

Sussex Railways

Railways Round Brighton

Railway Turntables

Steam on Shed

Southern Railway Stations

The London and South Western Railway

British Rail and the Southern Region

Preserved Steam


Southern Steam

 



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