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Martin Evans

Model Railway Engineering & Design

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Martin Evans - Model Railway and Live Steam Engineering & Design
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Birmingham (UK, West Midlands) Society of Model Engineers
North London Society of Model Engineers
Romney, Hythe & Dymchurch Railway
South Coast Railroad Museum (Goleta Valley Line)
Stapleford Miniature Railway (private; visiting days are limited)
The Sussex Miniature Locomotive Society (Beech Hurst)
Urmston & District Model Engineering Society

Titles to look out for:
[in alphabetical order of title; date given is that of first edition; later editions are included in each listing]
0-8-0 Caribou Switcher, "Caribou" in 3.5 in gauge (and "Buffalo", a 2-8-0, a consolidation)
Atlantic Era: The British Atlantic Locomotive
Evening Star
Introducing Model Steam Locomotive Construction
Inverness to Crewe: The British 4-6-0 Locomotive
LBSC's Shop, Shed and Road
Manual of Model Steam Locomotive Construction
Model Engineering
Model Locomotive Boilers
Model Locomotive Construction (electrically driven-"0" and "1" gauges)
Model Locomotive Valve Gears
The Model Steam Locomotive: A Complete Treatise on Design and Construction
Outdoor Model Railways
Pacific Steam: The British Pacific Locomotive
Rob Roy. How to Build a Simple 3.5 in gauge 0-6-0 tank locomotive based on the dockyard Engines of the Old Caledonian Railway
Simple Model Locomotive Building introducing LBSC's TICH
Simplex
Walschaert's Valve Gear. Revised by Martin Evans from Henry Greenly's original

About the Author:
Martin Evans right from the time he was a young lad was to be found watching the trains going past on the four-track Great Eastern main-line to Broxbourne and Cambridge and down to the amazingly complex Coppermill Junction; the line lay close to his parents' house overlooking Springfield Park in North-East London. In those days there were no diesel engines encroaching on steam territory; and the author is to be found in the preface to his 'Pacific Steam' book expressing admiration for the "Claud Hamiltons" and the "1500" 4-6-0's, which hauled the expresses that went past in those early days of his fascination with the railways.

Once he'd acquired a bike, he was to be found further afield watching the goods trains and wagon repairs at the large Temple Mills goods marshalling yards. It was also here that new types of locomotive turned up, food for the open-eyed budding railway enthusiast.

The author was witness to the new Gresley Pacifics' increasing appearances on the old Great Northern main line, where the Ivatt design "large" Atlantics and the occasional 990 type Atlantic used to hold sway (he used to watch the trains from the vantage points of the footpaths between Finsbury Park and Harringay; and between Harringay and Hornsea, where he used to watch Ivatts or rebuilt Stirling tanks shunting trains).

He was inspired to build his first live-steam model locomotive by LBSC, an old engineman of the former London, Brighton & South Coast Railway, who after he left service, spent the rest of his life building small locomotives and writing about them. He was editor of the magazine Model Engineer and before that was engaged professionally in the design, manufacture and repair of model locomotives of all gauges. He was responsible for the model Garratt locomotive and train supplied to Rhodesia Railways in connection with the Cecil Rhodes centenary exhibition

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Evans, Martin. '0-8-0 Caribou Switcher, "Caribou" in 3.5 in gauge (and "Buffalo", a 2-8-0-a Consolidation)', published by Model & Allied Publications Limited, 1977, 80 pages, illustrated. Condition: Good (verging on very good) condition copy, well looked-after with previous owner's name inside front cover and a little fading to the spine. Has shadow mark on top of contents page from bookmark.  Price: £19.50 (not including postage & packing, which for UK buyers is Amazon's standard £2.75 charge)
1977, Model & Allied Publications
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Synopsis/About this book: It's a nicely illustrated (although the quality of some photos is poor) and heavily detailed book that is designed to help model engineers get to grips with building an American locomotive of modern design and the example here is the Canadian National Railway's 0-8-0 switcher, Class P5. Contents: Introduction; Beams, Wheels and Axles; A Jig for Correct Centres in the Coupling Rods; Cylinders, Crossheads and Slidebars; Connecting Rods, Motion Plates and Valve Gear Brackets; Abner D. Baker and His Valve Gear; Copper or Steel for the Boiler?; Assembling and Brazing the Boiler; Testing Time; Steam Up and Away We Go!; Buffalo-a Pair of Pilot Wheels Makes Caribou a Consolidation! [additional pictures page 8 , page 12]

Evans, Martin. 'Atlantic Era: The British Atlantic Locomotive', published in 1961 by Percival Marshall in hardback with dustjacket, 94pp, No ISBN. One copy in stock at �5.75. Click image to access prebuilt search for this title on Amazon, among which our listings will be visible
1961, Percival Marshall, hbk
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Contents: Martin Evans tells the fascinating story of a class of locomotive which, with its 4-4-2 wheel arrangement (a U.S. development) was one of the leading express passenger locomotives from 1902-1936 and was superceded by the Pacific. The class got its name from Atlantic City in the US, which was one end of the high-speed run to Camden on the Philadelphia and Reading railroad. Typically Atlantics had cylinders on the outside, but the old Lancashire and Yorkshire railway 4-4-2s had them on the inside.

Atlantic locomotives hauled such famous trains as 'The Flying Scotsman' and 'The Brighton Belle' and the class was adopted by most main line companies. The first Atlantic appeared in Britain in 1898 and reached its heyday in the period prior to WWII, when some impressive performances were being notched up by Ivatt Atlantics, which had been modified by Nigel Gresley.

The history of British Engineering and Steam Locomotive Engineering is infused with the names of celebrity engineers; and the Atlantic locomotive is no exception. Harry Ivatt was a great believer in this type of locomotive and experimented with them on the old Great Northern. In particular he adopted the wide firebox type of boiler. The book is illustrated with photographs and includes tables of facts and figures, and details of performances on the track.

Chapters:
Introduction
1. First in the Field-The Ivatt Atlantics
2. The Lancashire and Yorkshire 4-4-2s
3. The North Eastern Atlantics
4. Churchward Experimenets
5. The Robinson Engines
6. North British Atlantics
7. The Atlantics of the L.B.S.C.R

Illustrations (photos-all black & white):
1. Great Northern Railway No. 990, Doncaster-built small-boilered Atlantic, later named "Henry Oakley". Withdrawn in 1937 and preserved in the NRM collection
2. Another view of No. 990
3. L. & N. E. R. No. 271, as rebuilt with two inside cylinders
4. A "Klondyke" Atlantic fitted with outside-framed leading bogie
5. No. 292, Ivatt's first compound Atlantic built in 1905
6. L. & N. E. R. No. 1300, the "Vulcan" rebuilt as a simple engine
7. G. N. R. No. 1421, Ivatt's second Compound Atlantic
8. L. N. E. R No. 1447 Atlantic with cut-down boiler mountings for 1923 trials
9. No. 3279 Ivatt Atlantic rebuilt by Gresley with Walschaerts valve gear
10. L. N. E. R (ex. G. N. R) No. 4419 as fitted with booster by Nigel Gresley
11. A Lancashire and Yorkshire 4-4-2 express locomotive as built
12. A Lancashire and Yorkshire 4-4-2 after the trailing frames had been modified
13. A Lancashire and Yorkshire Aspinall's 4-4-2, No. 700, after modifications
14. A Lancashire and Yorkshire 4-4-2, No. 10339, as repainted into L. M. S livery
15. A Lancashire and Yorkshire 4-4-2, No. 10303, as it was in early L. M. S days
16. A W. M. Smith's 4-cylinder Compound Atlantic, fitted with Stephenson's valve gear
17. A W. M. Smith's 4-cylinder Compound Atlantic, fitted with Walschaert's valve gear
18. N. E. R. 4-4-2 class V. I
19. L. N. E. R "Z" class 3-cylinder Atlantic
20. N. E. 3-cylinder Atlantic
21. N. E. R "Z" Class Atlantic fitted with A. C. F. I feed water heater
22. L. N. E. R "Z" Class locomotive in early L. N. E. R days
23. N. E. R. "Z" Class Atlantic with a Dabeg feed water heater
24. No. 2212, L. N. E. R Raven's "Z" Class with Stumf "Uniflow" cylinders
25. L. N. E. R No. 2171, a "Z" Class Atlantic rebuilt by Gresley with a booster and articulated tender
26. L. N. E. R No 732, a rebuilt "Z" Class Atlantic with Poppet valve cylinders fitted
27. No. 102, the first of the G. W. R. French Compounds, reboilered with a Swindon boiler
28. No. 102, "La France" as it looked when it first started running on the G. W. R.
29. G. W. R., No. 104 as first built
30. G.W. R. No. 104 when rebuilt with Swindon boiler
31. G. W. R. No 104, another view from the front right of the machine
32. G. W. R. No 181, Churchward's 2-cylinder Altantic
33. G. W. R. No 40, the pioneer Great Western 4-cylinder locomotive as 4-4-2
34. No. 1090, a Robinson Atlantic rebuilt as a 3-cylinder simple locomotive
35. Great Central No. 364 "Lady Henderson", a G. C. R Compound Atlantic
36. L. N. E. R. No. 6092
37. L. N. E. R. No. 5258, a G. C. R. compound locomotive
38. N. B. R. (North British Railways) No. 881 "Borderer", a Reid Atlantic
39. N. B. R. No. 9510(?) in L. N. E. R livery, superheated, with mechanical lubrication
40. L. N. E. R No. 9875 "Midlothian", one of the first batch of North British Atlantics to go into L. N. E. R livery
41. L. B. S. C Class H.1 Atlantic Locomotive
42. Southern No. 2041 H.1 Atlantic Locomotive
43. No. 2039 H.1 class "Hartland Point", which was rebuilt by Bulleid in connection with "Leader" class experiments
44. L. B. S. C. No. 421, Class H.2
45. L. B. S. C No. 422, later named "North Foreland"
46. Southern Railway No. 426 "St. Alban's Head"
47. Southern Railway No. 424
48. L. B. S. C. No. 32422 running in British Railways livery
49. No. 32424 "Beachy Head", the last survivor of the British Atlantics

Tables:
1. Compares the Stirling 1003, Ivatt 990 and Ivatt 251 locomotives on cylinders, driving wheels, boiler pressure, tractive effort at 85% (Working Pressure), Total Heating surface and Grate Area
2. Main Dimensions of Ivatt G.N.R Atlantics. Compares No. 251, No. 292, No. 1412 and No. 1300 ("Vulcan") on cylinders, driving wheels, heating surface: tubes and firebox, grate area, working pressure and tractive effort
3. Locomotive Exchanges. L. N. W. R. and Great Northern Railway. 1909.
Compares average load per trip, train miles run, coal burnt per train mile and coal burnt per ton-mile on the L. N. W. R main line for an L. N. W. R Precursor 4-4-0 locomotive No. 510 against a G. N. R large Atlantic No. 1449.
Also looks at average load per trip, coal burnt per train mile and coal burnt per ton-mile on the G. N. main line for an L. N. W. R Precursor 4-4-0 locomotive No. 510 against a G. N. R large Atlantic No. 1449.
4. This table looks at distance between stations (miles), schedule (mins), actual time (mins, seconds) and speeds (m.p.h) by L. N. E. R "Queen of Scots" Express on the Leeds-King's Cross run, using G. N. 4-4-2 engine No. 4456 with a load of 277 tons tare, 290 tons gross under:
Driver: W. Worboys
Fireman: C. Fisher, of King's Cross
5. Looks at the L. N. E. R Grantham-York run using G. N. 4-4-2 engine No. 4404 with a load of 585 tons gross under:
Driver: Walker, of Wakefield
6. Looks at the Aspinall 4-4-2 Locomotive No. 1403 with a load of 105 tons gross on the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway with the 11.45 a.m run from Manchester to Liverpool. It gives details of the stations, mileage between them, time taken (in mins, seconds) and maximum speeds attained under:
Driver. J. Syfas
7. Details the information on two types of locomotive in the Atlantic trials on the North Eastern Section in 1924. The two types are V1 Superheated and Z Superheated. Gives information on the type of the locomotive (i.e. 2-cyl. 4-4-2), average coal burnt per Drawbar-Horsepower-Hour. lb; average water used per Drawbar-Horsepower-Hour. lb; average mileage between repairs (for the whole class) and average mileage before renewal of coupled wheel tyres
8. Looks at a run on the North Eastern Railway on "The Flying Scotsman" using 4-4-2 Class Z1 No. 732 engine, with a load of 502 tons tare, 550 tons full. Station names and distances in miles are given between; also actual time taken is recorded, as well as speed in miles per hour
9. Looks at a run on the L. N. E. R. North Eastern section from Darlington to York, using "Z" Class 4-4-2 No. 2163 with a load of 7 coaches, 220 tons full. Station names and distances in miles are given between; also actual time taken is recorded, as well as speed in miles per hour
10. Looks at a run on the L. N. E. R. North Eastern section from Grantham to York using "Z" Class 4-4-2 No. 721 with a load of 280 tons gross. Station names and distances in miles are given between; also actual time taken is recorded, as well as speed in miles per hour
11. List of Great Western Railway Atlantics split into Two-cylinder, Four-cylinder and Four-cylinder compound locomotives
12. Looks at a run on the L. N. E. R. from Marylebone to Leicester using G. C. R 2-cylinder 4-4-2 engine No. 5363 with driver Newall and Fireman Lees. Station names and distances in miles are given between; also actual time taken is recorded, as well as speed in miles per hour
13. The N. B. R. - L. N. W. R Exchange looks at the engines L. N. W "Redgauntlet" and N. B. R "Borderer" on a run from Carlisle to Preston and then Preston to Carlisle. Specifically it looks at length of trip, running time, drawbar pull at starting, maximum speed reached, average speed and the load hauled. The average coal burnt for all runs is also recorded
14. Results of the 1923 Altantic Trials. Looks at N.B.R No. 878; N. E. R. No 733 and G. N. R. No. 1447 in terms of average load (tons tare) on service and special trains, average speed, average drawbar, average steamchest pressures, average cut-off used, coal burnt per drawbar h.p. hour (lb.), average superheat temperature in degrees Fahrenheit and evaporation lb. of water per lb. of coal burnt. Performance on Cockburnspath Bank is recorded.
15. Looks at a run on the North British Railway from Aberdeen to Dundee using Engine No. 868 "Aberdonian" with a load of 330 tons net, 350 tons gross with driver John Kennedy of Dundee. Station names and distances in miles are given between; also actual time taken is recorded, as well as speed in miles per hour
16. Looks at a run on the L. N. E. R North British Section from Dundee to Edinburgh using 4-4-2 engine No. 875 "Midlothian" with a load of 364 tons net, 390 tons gross. Station names and distances in miles are given between; also actual time taken is recorded, as well as speed in miles per hour
17. Looks at a run on the L. N. E. R North British Section from Dundee to Aberdeen using 4-4-2 engine No. 9509 "Duke of Rothesay" with a load of 359 tons net, 380 tons gross, with driver Moody, and fireman Williamson. Station names and distances in miles are given between; also actual time taken is recorded, as well as speed in miles per hour
18. Looks at a run on the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway from Brighton to Victoria using 4-4-2 engine No. 426, Class H. 2 with a load of 285 tons gross. Station names and distances in miles are given between; also actual time taken is recorded, as well as speed in miles per hour
19. Looks at a run on the Southern Railway from Brighton to Victoria using 4-4-2 engine No. 426 Class H. 2 with a load of 300 tons gross. Station names and distances in miles are given between; also actual time taken is recorded, as well as speed in miles per hour
20. Principal dimensions of leading British Atlantic Locomotives. Looks at cylinders (number and size), total heating surface, grate area, working pressure, driving wheels, engine weight (tons) and tractive effort (lbs) for the G. N. R (large), the G. C. R., the L. Y. R, the L. B. S. C., the N. B. R., the N. E. R. "V" and the N. E. R. "Z"

Looking for a 1st Edition? Try, this Amazon listing: 1961, Percival Marshall

Undated, MAP, Hardcover

Undated, Percival Marshall, Hardcover

Other Titles of Interest:

Books on Locomotive Builders:

Books on Locomotive Development:

Evans, Martin. 'Evening Star: Building a 3.5 inch gauge B.R. 2.10.0 Locomotive' published in 1980 in Great Britain in paperback by Model and Allied Publications, 224pp, ISBN 0852426348. Condition: Good++ clean & tidy condition with some slight marks on the cover (from age and handling wear). Overall a nice clean and tidy copy. Price: £25.00, not including post and packing, which is Amazon's standard charge (currently £2.75 for UK buyers, more for overseas customers)
1980, Model & Allied Publications, pbk
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About Evening Star: Evening Star, No. 92220, was the last steam locomotive built for British Railways and left Swindon in 1960 as the final unit of an impressive 999 steam locomotives built to the British Railways standard designs in force since nationalisation of the railways in 1948. 2-10-0 locomotives were primarily designed for fast freight duties, but were occasionally used as express passenger locomotives and were capable of reaching 90mph.

Contents: Martin Evans presents the reader with all the information required to construct and exact scale model of this famous 2-10-0 engine in an authoritative text supported by diagrams and a fine set of photographs. This is a 3.5 inch gauge version, originally constructed by LBSC “Curly” Lawrence and it includes instructions to build it with a single chimney and blastpipe; or a double chimney (more complicated) depending on the model builder’s preference.  The frames should be made of 1/8 inch mild steel with a somewhat simplified arrangement of staying. Cast hornblocks are used with solid axleboxes. No oil pipes are required, as the bearings and sliding surfaces can be oiled from the outside. The pony truck can be cast or built up. No side control springs are specified for the sake of simplicity; the friction between the top bar and the bearing plate should be sufficient to prevent “nosing” on a straight line, and yet leave the wheels free to follow a curve at speed without derailment. The ten coupled wheels are 3.75 in. diameter, the centre pair having no flanges, as on the full-size locomotive. The cylinders are gunmetal castings, though there is no reason why builders should not use cast iron if they prefer. They are 1.25 inches bore; and 1.75 inches stroke with 11/16 inches piston valves of rustless steel, running in pressed-in gunmetal liners. Alternative slide valve cylinders will also be described, for those who prefer them to piston valves. The valve gear is Walschaerts, the only awkward bits of which are the brackets that carry the expansion links. Valve spindle guides are not specified, although the more ambitious builders may decide to fit them, particularly since the full-sized version carries them.

The boiler on the big engine would be built up in sections which telescope over each other to give a large diameter at the firebox than at the smokebox; however on the model this is different - the boiler can be a single piece of seamless copper tube, brazed to the throatplate of hte firebox wrapper, which simplifies construction. The inside of the boiler contains a combustion chamber self-stayed by watertube struts, a great help to circulation; and three large superheater flues, each containing two elements. The boiler is fed with water by a pump driven by an eccentric on one of the axles and by an injector located on the left-hand side below the cab. Both mechanisms deliver the feed water through clacks on the top of the barrel, as happens in the full-size locomotive. An emergency hand pump is also provided in the tender and inexperienced enginemen will probably find this useful; it is useful anyway in testing the boiler.

The smokebox can be made out of steel sheet rolled up, with the joint brazed, or using a seamless brass tube, which is more expensive, but is easier to make. Both the smokebox door and ring are castings from gunmetal. The superstructure of cab, running boards and so on are made akin to full-size practice and built up mainly from brass sheet, which forms a nice exercise in sheet-metal working. When this model was made (by Martin Evans), he noted that it was a tight squeeze to get the brake gear in owing to the very close spacing of the driving and coupled wheels, especially given the need to use flanges which are rather deeper than the "scale" equivalent

Summary of general specifications:

  • Has the normal double chimney as fitted to the locomotive originally
  • Frames made from 1/8 in. mild steel with simplified staying
  • Hornblocks are cast with solid axleboxes
  • Oilpipes not required - bearings and sliding surfaces can be oiled from the outside
  • Pony truck can be cast or built up
  • No side control springs are used to keep the model simple
  • The friction between the top bar and the bearing plate should be sufficient to prevent "nosing" on a straight line, and yet leave the wheels free to follow a curve without derailing at speed
  • The ten coupled wheels are 3 3/4 inches in diameter. The centre pair have no flanges as on a full size locomotive
  • The cylinders are gunmetal castings but cast iron can be used - they are 1 1/4 inch bore and 1 3/4 inch stroke.
  • Piston valves are 11/16 inches of rustless steel running in pressed-in gunmetal liners
  • For those who prefer them to piston valves, internal slide valve cylinders are also described
  • Valve gear is Walschaerts
  • Boiler is fed by a pump driven by an eccentric on one of the axles and by an injector located on the left-hand side below the cab
  • An emergency hand pump is also provided in the tender
  • The superstructure - cab, running boards, etc - follows full-size practice and is built up mainly from brass sheet

Chapters:
Introduction
1. "LBSC" leads off with a description of the frames
2. The Wheels
3. Coupling rods
4. The Pony Truck
5. The Boiler Feed Pump
6. The Piston Valve Cylinders
7. The Valves
8. Valve Gear
9. Valve Gear for Slide Valve Cylinders
10. Cylinder Lubricator
11. First details of the boiler
12. Oxy-acetylene boilersmithing
13. Martin Evans now takes up the story
14. The tender
Index

 

9F Steam
Evans, Martin. 'Introducing Model Steam Locomotive Construction', published in 1981 in Great Britain by Keith Dickson Publishing in paperback, 114pp, ISBN 0907266053. Condition: very good condition with a tiny tiny hole on the very top edge of the cover and the next few pages (no loss of text or readability). A well looked-after copy. Price: £10.00, not including post and packing, which is Amazon UK's standard charge (currently £2.80 for UK buyers, more for overseas customers)
1981, Keith Dickson Publishing, pbk
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About this book: In spite of the disappearance of the steam locomotive from the railways of Britain, and in fact from most of the railways throughout the world, the popularity of the model steam locomotive continues unabated. It would be true to say that the model steam locomotive, especially that fired by coal, is sitll the most popular project among model engineers. More and more "live-steam" model locomotives are being built, not only in this country but in many other countries throughout the world; this applies particularly to those locomotives built for hauling "live" passengers, such as can be seen on many Club and Society tracks in all parts of the country. This book is chiefly aimed at those who have discovered an interest in the steam locomotive, and perhaps have seen miniature steam locomotive at exhibitions, or working on the Club track, but have not yet attempted to build their own model. The author remarks that it has not been possible to go thoroughly into every aspect of locomotive design and construction in the space available (for example only two valve gears are described) , but the author hoped that enough information was included to give the beginner some idea of what is involved in terms of workshop facilities required, materials involved and the basic elements of locomotive construction.

Contents:
Introduction
1. How the steam locomotive works and nomenclature of the essential parts
2. The choice of scale and gauge
3. Choosing a prototype
4. Workshop facilities
5. Making a start on the model; the frames and stretchers
6. Wheels and Axles, Crankpins, Coupling Rods, Bogies
7. Cylinders, Crossheads, Slide Bars, Motion Plates
8. Connecting Rods, Valve Gears
9. Boilers for Model Locomotives
10. Smokeboxes, Feed Pumps, Lubrication
11. Boiler Fittings, Regulators, Safety Valves
12. Plate-work, Cabs, Tenders, Painting, Raising Steam, Driving

Illustrations (all in black and white)
p2. Photo of a 3.5in. gauge Caledonian Railway 0-6-0 tank engine (no.534), which is one of the author's most popular designs
p3. Photo of a Canadian type 0-8-0 "switcher" called Caribou (no. 8402), also designed by Martin Evans as a change from British prototypes
p4. Photo of a finished live steam model locomotive boiler. This Belpaire type was built by the author
p5. Photo of a well-filled locomotive backhead. Drivers of miniature live steam locomotives develop heat-proof fingers!
p9. Diagram showing a 4-6-0 locomotive with all the parts labelled such as eccentric rod, reach rod, expansion link, etc
p11. Photo showing one of the commonest valve gear arrangements - the Walschaerts gear, here fitted to a 5 in. gauge 4-6-0 chassis
p16. Top. Photo of the late Bertie Green driving his 3.5in. gauge Rob Roy 0-6-0 Caledonian tank engine. Note the coal supply on the driver's truck
p16. Bottom. Photo of a fine 5in. gauge model of an earl American locomotive with the characteristic spark arrester, cowcatcher and other distinctive features
p17. Photo to demonstrate the sheer scale of a 7.25in. gauge - the point being that large prototypes make large live steam models, as shown here on a Californian ground-level track
p18. Photo of the large of the "model" gauges is the 10.25in. In this photo can be seen the late Lord Gretton with his 'John O' Gaunt' engine at Stapleford Park (Stapleford Miniature Railway)
p20. Photo of an excellent example of a G.W.R "King" 4-6-0 built in 3.5in. gauge by L.H. Joyce
p22. This photo shows an example of the 3.5in. gauge Caribou design as built by South African lady model engineer Mrs. R. Etter
p23. Photo of an industrial locomotive called 'Lord Mayor' in 5 inch gauge. The example shown here was built by Peter Dupen
p24. Photo of a beautifully constructed 0-6-0 designed by LBSC "Curly" Lawrence and built by E. A. Allchin. It uses inside cylinders and Stephenson valve gear
p26. Photo of the Myford ML10 lathe, a smaller lathe than the famous 7, designed with the model engineer in mind and capable of handling all but the largest 3.5in. gauge locomotives
p27. Photo of a pillar drill - it's an essential piece of kit in locomotive construction and other model engineering work. The model shown here is a small one from Cowell engineering
p28. Photo of the Amolco milling attachment which is designed to fit Myford and Boxford lathes and which will handle all the milling work on the average locomotive
p30. Photo of a finely constructed chassis for a 5in. gauge G.W.R "Manor" class 4-6-0, yet another of the author's designs!
p31. Fig. 2. Showing the assembly of the buffer beam for a 5in. gauge locomotive
p32. Fig. 3. Diagram of a frame stretcher for a 5in. gauge locomotive
p34. top left - fig. 4 - scale diagram of a hornblock and stay for a 3.5in. gauge locomotive; top right - fig 5. - scale diagram of an axlebox for gauge 1 models; bottom left - fig 6. - scale diagram of main axlebox for 3/4in. scale models; bottom right - fig 7. - scale diagram of a 5in. gauge axlebox for coil springing
p36. Figure 8. Illustration of the set-up for end milling model locomotive horns
p37. Figure 9. Scale diagram of the arrangement of leaf springs and horns for the 5in. gauge
p40. Figure 10. Diagram of set-ups for turning wheels
p41. Figure 11. Ilustration of a crankpin drilling jig
p43. Figure 12. Illustration of a crankpin drilling jig in use
p44. Figure 13. Five sets of illustrations showing axles for gauge '0' models, axles for gauge 1", axles for 2.5" gauge, axles for 3.5" gauge, 3/4" scale, and axles for 5" gauge 1 1/16" scale
p45. Figure 14. Illustrations of crankpins for 3/4" scale and 5" gauge
p48. Figure 15. (top): Illustration of a coupling rod
p48. Figure 16. (bottom): Coupling Rod Drilling jig illustration
p49. Photograph of a coupling rod, connecting rod and crosshead on a 3.5in. gauge 2-6-4 tank under construction by Martin Evans
p50. Figure 17. Illustration of a simple bogie for gauge '0' or '1'
p51. Figure 18. Illustration of a 2 1/2" gauge bogie
p52. Figure 19. Illustration of a Midland Railway Bogie, 5" gauge
p52. Figure 20. Scale diagram of a 5" gauge bogie with individual springing
p53. Figure 21. Top. Scale diagram of an equaliser and spring buckle of the Midland bogie
p53. Figure 22. Bottom. Scale diagram of a G.W.R type bar frame bogie
p54, left. Figure 23. Illustration of a pony truck for a 3.5in. gauge locomotive
p54, right. Figure 23. Arrangement of side-control springing
p55. Figure 24. Illustration of a simplified arrangement of radial axleboxes
p57. Photo of some of the parts for a 5in. gauge G.E.R. 4-4-0 locomotive under construction by L. Labram
p58. Top. Figure 25. Scale diagram of a cylinder for gauge "0" models
p58. Bottom. Figure 26. Illustation of the inside cylinders with valves on top
p59. Figure 27. Scale diagram of the inside cylinders with valves underneath for a 5" gauge model
p60, top. Figure 28. Illustration of an outside cylinder with inside steam chest
p60, bottom. Figure 29. Illustration of a modern piston valve cylinder
p61, top. Figure 30. Illustration of a cylinder held in a 4-Jaw Chuck for boring
p61, bottom. Figure 31. Illustration of a cylinder held in VEE-angle plate on faceplate
p62. Figure 32. Illustration of a boring cylinder by between-centre boring bar
p64. Figure 33. Illustration of four methods of fixing pistons
p65. Figure 34. Illustration of the lining up of the rear cylinder cover
p66. Figure 35. Illustration of the motion plate for inside cylinders
p67. Figure 36. Illustration of the G.W.R. type outside motion plate
p68. Figure 37. Illustration of a typical two-bar crosshead
p69. Top. Figure 38. Illustration of an L.N.E.R. type crosshead 3/4" scale
p69. Bottom. Figure 39. Illustration of a simple crosshead for small models
p70. Photo of fluting a connecting rod on a horizontal milling machine, a job carried out on the lathe by many model engineers
p72. Figure 40. Three illustrations of A) Slide valve without lap; B) Slide valve with lap; C) Piston valve with lap
p74. Figure 41. Illustration of a slip eccentric valve gear
p74. Figure 42. Illustration of methods of fitting eccentric straps to rods
p75. Photo of boring an eccentric strap in the lathe. A four-jaw chuck is essential for awkward-shaped parts such as this
p76. Figure 43. Illustration of Stephenson's valve gear with loco. type link
p78. Figure 44. Illustration of Stephenson's valve gear with launch type link
p78. Figure 45. Illustration of Walschaerts valve gear
p80. Figure 46. Illustration of the combination lever showing the stroke with internal; and external admission
p81. Figure 47. Illustration of how to find the pitch circle of the return crankpin to obtain the required movement from the return crank. The movement obtained from the return crank is 90 degrees out of phase from the movement obtained from the crosshead
p82. Figure 48. Illustration of how to find the pitch circle diameter of the return crank
p83. Figure 49. Illustration of the forward-type lifting link
p84. Figure 50. Illustration of the 5" gauge LMS type expansion link
p85. Photo of the set-up for milling a curved slot in an expansion link, on the author's lathe. The second link and pivot can be seen ready prepared
p87. Figure 51. Illustrations of 5 different types of locomotive boilers: 1. Parallel round top; 2. Parallel Belpaire; 3. Taper G. W. type; 4. G. N. Atlantic type; 5. L. M. S. Pacific type
p88. Top. Figure 52. Illustration of a water tube boiler for gauge 1 locomotives
p88. Bottom. Photo of a nicely made boiler for a 3.5in. gauge Britannia by Alec Farmer, a well-known expert in boiler construction
p89. Photo of a 5in. gauge G.W.R. type taper barrel boiler constructed by Martin Evans for this Firefly design
p90. Figure 53. Illustration of a 1/2" scale water tube boiler
p90. Figure 54. Illustration of a typical modern boiler for 3.5"/5" gauge locomotives
p91. Photo of the firebox of a small 5in. gauge locomotive boiler. Copper is virtually universal for all such work under 7.25in. gauge
p92. Photo of another firebox, this time for the author's Belpaire type boiler for a 5 in. gauge 4-4-0 locomotive
p93. Table giving the suitable thicknesses of seamless copper tubes for model boilers
p95. Photo of the superheater for a 3.5in. gauge 2-6-4- tank locomotive under construction by the author
p96. Table giving thickness of inner wrapper for a boiler, stay diameter and thread, and pitch for working pressure (80-90 p.s.i.)
p98. Figure 55. Illustration of an axle-driven feed pump
p99. Figure 56. Illustration of a tender hand pump
p100. Figure 57. Scale diagram of a mechanical lubricator of simple design
p102. Figure 58. Illustration of a slide valve regulator
p103. Figure 59. Full page illustration of a pin valve regulator
p104. Figure 60. Illustration of a safety valve
p105. Figure 61. Illustration of a water gauge
p106. Left. Figure 62. Illustration of a blowdown valve
p106. Right. Figure 63. Illustration of a check valve
p107. Figure 64. Illustration of a vertical check valve
p108. Photo showing a cab view of the Rob Roy 0-6-0 tank built by the late Bertie Green. Note part of the roof has been detached for easier operation
p112. Photo of a 5 inch gauge L.B.S.C.R "Terrier" called Boxhill by Mr. Thornton
p114. Photo of a 7.25 inch gauge G.W.R. 4-6-0 on Mr. Ted Martin's garden railway at Thame



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Evans, Martin. 'Inverness to Crewe: The British 4-6-0 Locomotive', published in 1966 by Model Aeronautical Press (Percival Marshall), with dustjacket, 164pp. Condition: Good, clean copy, with some light tanning to pages & dj and previous owner's initials in front. Price: £5.25, not including p&p, which is Amazon's standard charge (currently £2.75 for UK buyers, more for overseas customers)
1966, Model Aeronautical Press
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About this book: Martin Evans takes a look in this book at the 4-6-0 locomotive, which has always been perceived as a most typically British locomotive. However, in reality, it originated in America, some 47 years earlier than it was adopted for main line working in this country in 1894. The former Great Western Railway made the greatest use of locomotives of the 4-6-0 wheel arrangement, building this type for express, semi-fast and mixed-traffic services. On this railway too, the 4-6-0 reached its peak of size and power, when Collett brought out his famous "King" class.

Nearly all the pre-1922 railways built 4-6-0's, and the "Big Four" of1923-1948 produced them in large numbers. The British Railways standard Class 5 and Class 4 Engines proved worthy successors to a long line of outstanding designs.

This book is the third in a series (See also The Atlantic Era: The British Atlantic Locomotive; and Pacific Steam: The British Pacific Locomotive) covering the whole history of the British steam railway locomotive. The author, who is well known for his writings in "Model Engineer" on model steam locomotive practice, has made a special study of the 4-6-0 type of engine and he tells here the whole story, with the help of photographs of all the various classes, tables of performances and details of design and construction. A chapter is also devoted to the great locomotive exchanges of 1948. A short foreword has been contributed by J. F. Harrison, Chief Mechanical Engineer, British Railways Board

Chapters:
Introduction
1. The First 4-6-0: The Highland Railway
2. Dean and Churchward
3. North Eastern 4-6-0s
4. McIntoch and Pickersgill
5. The Robinson Engines
6. Manson and the Glasgow and Sout Western
7. 4-6-0s of the Premier Line
8. Drummond and Urie
9. 4-6-0s of the Lancashire and Yorkshire
10. Great Eastern 4-6-0s
11. Collett and Hawksworth
12. Gresley and Thompson
13. Maunsell
14. Triumph of the "Scots"
15. The Great Exchanges
16. Finale under British Railways

Illustrations/Plates (in order of appearance)
p3. The First 4-6-0: Highland Railway "Jones Goods"
p6. Another view of the "Jones Goods"
p8. The Highland "Castle" class, No. 140 of the Dubs series
p8. No. 59 of the third series of Highland "Castles"
p11, top. The Smith "River" class, originally built for the Highland, but purchased by the Caledonian Railway
p11, middle. The Highland "Clan Goods" 4-6-0
p11, bottom. Highland "Clan" No. 49
p15, top. The first of the Great Western 4-6-0s
p15, middle. The "Kruger" 4-6-0, the second engine of this wheel arrangement built at Swindon
p15, bottom. Great Western 2-cylinder 4-6-0, No. 100
p17, top. Churchward's prototype 4-6-0
p17, middle. One of the "Saint" or 2900 class engines
p17, bottom. "Caynham Court" was the only Great Western engine to have poppet valves
p19, top. A "Saint" in its final form, in British Railways livery (2920, Saint David)
p19, middle. A 4-cylinder "Star" class as running in Churchward's time (4002, Evening Star)
p19, bottom. A 4-cylinder "Star" class in final form (4035, Queen Charlotte)
p25, top. One of the first North Eastern 4-6-0s (No. 2005)
p25, middle. Class S1 4-6-0, North Eastern Railway
p25, bottom. Class S2, fitted with Stumpf "Uniflow" cylinders
p29. No. 846, the Raven 3-cylinder 4-6-0 Class S2
p33, top. No. 58. McIntosh 55 or "Oban" class engine
p33, bottom. No. 50. One of the first of McIntosh's big express 4-6-0
p35. The famous "Cardean", built in 1906
p37, top. McIntosh "918" class, a development of the "55" class
p37, middle. No. 909 of the "Sir James King" class
p37, bottom. McIntosh superheater 4-6-0 No. 179 of 1913
p40, top. No. 62, a Pickersgill 2-cylinder 4-6-0
p40, middle. Pickersgill's unsuccessful three-cylinder 4-6-0
p40, bottom. Pickersgill's last design: the small 4-6-0 for the Oban line, in L.M.S livery (14616?)
p44, top. Robinson "Fish" class 4-6-0, No. 180, was built in 1984.
p44, middle. Robinson 4-6-0, No. 196, built by Beyer Peacock & Co.
p44, bottom. 4-6-0 class 8F "Immingham"
p46, top. "Small Fish", 4-6-0 No. 1110, built in 1906
p46, middle. "Sir Sam Fay", 4-6-0 express
p46, bottom. No. 4, "Glenalmond", was a mxed traffic version of the "Sam Fay " class
p48, top. No. 416. One of the small classes of Great Central mixed-traffic engines. L.N.E.R. Class B6
p48, bottom. No. 1169. The well-known "Lord Faringdon", GCR Class 9P
p50, top. No. 1166 of the four-cylinder express passenger type
p50, bottom. No. 1165.. "Valour", which was the Great Central's War Memorial engine
p51, top. No. 6167, Great Central 9P rebuilty
p52, top. Great Central 9P, rebuilt by Gresley with poppet valve cylinder
p52, middle. No. 6168. "Lord Stewart of Wortley", as rebuilt by the LNER
p52, bottom. The four-cylinder mixed-traffic Class 9Q, L.N.E.R. Class B7
p56, top. G.S.W.R. 4-6-0 No. 512
p56, bottom left. No. 501. Manson's (James Manson, 1846-June 1935) first 4-6-0 design for the Glasgow and South Western Railway
p56, bottom right. Manson 4-6-0 with Weir feed-water heater
p60, top. Webb's four-cylinder Compound 4-6-0
p60, middle. L.N.W.R "Experiment" Class
p60, bottom. "Experiment" class engine fitted with Beames' valve gear
p63, top. No. 1361. "Prospero", the "Experiment" with four cylinders and Dendy-Marshall valve arrangement
p63, middle. L.N.W.R "Prince of Wales" class, first built in 1911
p63, bottom. Four-cylinder 4-6-0 "Claughton" class
p70, top. No. 5953, one of the "Claughton" rebuilds with larger boiler
p70, bottom. No. 5927. A "Claughton" with larger boiler and Caprotti valve gear
p74, top. No. 333, one of the first series of Drummond 4-6-0s
p74, middle. No. 456 of Drummond's G14 class
p74, bottom. No. 0449. One of the L.S.W.R P14s in Southern Livery
p76, top. No. 462, "Paddlebox" built 1912
p76, bottom. No. 460, T14 class as rebuilt by the Southern Railway
p79, top. No. 491, Urie's H15 class 4-6-0
p79, middle. No 248. L.S.W.R. N15 class built 1922
p79, bottom. No. 511. Urie mixed-traffic class S15
p83, top. No. 1510, Lancashire and Yorkshire 4-6-0
p83, middle. No. 1522, Lancashire and Yorkshire 4-6-0 rebuilt by Hughes
p83, bottom. No 10456. Hughes 4-6-0 rebuilt as a Compound by the L.M.S.R
p88, top. No. 1500. The first of Holden's 1500 class 4-6-0 engines. View from front and along right hand side of the engine
p88, middle. No. 1500, right-hand side view
p88, bottom. No 8523. Great Eastern 4-6-0 fitted with A.C.F.I feed-water heater
p89, No. 8579. Gresley's rebuild of the Great Eastern 1500 class
p90, No. 61556. B12/2 rebuild in British Railways livery
p93, No. 4073. The first of Collett's famous "Castle" Class
p96, top. No. 5017, a "Castle" class 4-6-0 with the Hawksworth tender
p96, bottom. No. 5005. "Manorbier Castle" with partial stream-lining
p99, top. No. 6000. Collett's magnificent "King Class", "King George V"
p99, middle. A "King" with later modifications
p99, bottom. No. 6014. "King Henry VII" fitted with streamlining casings
p106, top. No. 6029, "King Stephen"
p106, middle. No. 6000, "King George V" fitted with bell commemorating the visit of the engine to the U.S. in 1927 on the Cumbrian Coast Express run
p106, bottom. No 4901, "Adderley Hall" built December 1928, the first of Collett's "Hall" Class
p109, top. No. 6800, "Arlington Grange", Collett's mixed-traffic 4-6-0
p109, middle. No. 7800 Torquay Manor, a light 4-6-0 designed by Collett
p109, bottom. Hawksworth's "Modified Hall"
p111, top. No. 1000. The first of Hawksworth's "1000" class, fitted with double chimney
p111, middle. No. 1001. Great Western "1000" class 4-6-0
p111, bottom. No. 7018. Drysllwyn Castle, a "Castle" in its final form with double chimney and high superheat
p115, top. No. 2870 "Manchester City" (original name) L.N.E.R 4-6-0 Class B17 with standard tender
p115, middle. No. 2870 "City of London" L.N.E.R. 4-6-0 Class B17 streamlined for working the "East Anglian"
p115, bottom. No 61657 "Doncaster Rovers" L.N.E.R 4-6-0 Class B17 fitted with new boiler and in British Railways livery. 61657 was originally numbered 2857
p118, top. No. 8301, "Springbok", the first of Thompson's standard B1 class engines
p118, middle. No 61379, "Mayflower", a 4-6-0 B1 Class
p118, bottom. No 2871, "Manchester City", 4-6-0 Thompson Class B2
p121, top. No. 798. Southern Railway "King Arthur" class 4-6-0
p121, middle. No. 30768 "King Arthur" class locomotive with eight-wheel tender for the Western section.
p121, bottom. No. 832, Maunsell 4-6-0 mixed-traffic No. 832
p125, top. No. 2329, the rebuilt "Remembrance" class engine "Stephenson" in Southern Region livery
p125, middle. No. 856, "Lord St. Vincent", Southern Railway, "Lord Nelson" Class
p125, bottom. No. 857, "Lord Howe", fitted with special combustion-chamber boiler
p126, top. No. 863, "Lord Rodney", fitted with experimental chimney
p126, bottom. No. 852, "Sir Walter Raleigh", in final form with Lemaitre chimney
p131, top. No. 6100, "The Royal Scot" as first built
p131, bottom. Cab fittings of a "Royal Scot" class locomotive
p134, top. No. 6102, "Black Watch", class 4-6-0 "Royal Scot" class in LMS livery
p134, middle. No. 6100, "The Royal Scot" on return from America with special fittings
p134, bottom. No. 5511, "Isle of Man", "Patriot" Class locomotive in London, Midland and Scottish livery
p136, top. No. 6399 "Fury", super high-pressure locomotive, seen in LMS livery, side view
p136, middle. No. 6170 "British Legion", rebuilt from No. 6399 Fury in 1935, see in LMS livery, side view
p136, bottom. No. 5564, "New South Wales", an L.M.S. 4-6-0 Class 5XP, first series
p139, top. No. 5684, "Jutland", fitted with double chimney and blastpipe, a Stanier 4-6-0 Class 5XP
p139, middle. No. 5530, "Sir Frank Ree", rebuilt "Patriot" class locomotive
p139, bottom. No 45534, rebuilt "Patriot" class with smoke deflectors
p144, top. No. 46169, "The Boy Scout", rebuilt "Royal Scot" class
p144, middle. No. 5020, Stanier Class 5 mixed-traffic, first series in LMS livery
p144, bottom. No. 4814, L.M.S Class 5 4-6-0 with separate top-feed
p147, No.44680, One of the later Stanier Class 5s
p148, No. 44741, Class 5 with Caprotti Valve Gear
p148, Rear of standard L.M.S. tender as used on standard 4-6-0s
p148, No. 44741, another view (from front looking down left hand side) of this Caprotti Class 5 engine
p150, top. No. 4767, L.M.S. Class 5 with outside Stephenson valve gear
p150, bottom. No. 44686, the final version of the L.M.S. Class 5 with Caprotti valve gear, double chimney and high running plate
p158, top. No. 73001, British Railways Standard Class 5
p158, bottom. No. 73125, British Railways Standard Class 5 with Caprotti Valve Gear
p161, top. No. 75000, British Railways Standard Class 4
p161, bottom. No. 75029, British Railways Standard Class 4 with double chimney

Tables & Chapter in which they occur:
Chapter: 4-6-0s of the Lancashire and Yorkshire
p83. Table 1. L.M.S.R Dynamometer Car Tests, Carlisle-Preston, 1925, Southbound Runs & Northbound Runs timing
p85. Table 2. L.M.S.R Dynamometer Car Tests, Carlisle-Preston, 1925, Average Coal Consumption
Chapter: Great Eastern 4-6-0s
p89. Table 3. Great Eastern Railway. Liverpool Street to Parkeston Quay, timings table using engine No. 1566, Driver H. Chapman, Load 388 tons tare, about 415 tons gross
Chapter: Collet & Hawksworth
p97. Table 4. Great Western Railway. Table of timings for the Cheltenham Flyer using locomotive Tregenna Castle 5006 compared to 5039 Rhuddlan Castle. Tregenna Castle was driven by Ruddock, with 185 tons tare/195 tons gross; Rhuddlan Castle was driven by F. W. Street 223 tons tare/235 tons gross
p102. Table 5. Great Western Railway timings table for the Cornish Riviera Express pulled by No. 6028, King Henry II (later renamed King George VI) with a load of 555 tons full to Westbury and 440 tons full to Newton Abbott
p104. Table 6. Evaporation test results table for Engines: 6001, King Edward VII running on Markham colliery coal; 46225, Duchess of Gloucester running on South Kirby coal; and 71000 Duke of Gloucester running on South Kirby coal. Table gives coal burn rate (lb per hour) and steam to cylinders figures (lb per hour). Power output figures are included with steam rate figures in lb per hour, speed in m.p.h, and power output in i.h.p. and d.b.h.p.
p107. Table 7. Table of timings for the Western Region, running from Little Somerford to Paddington using engine No. 7904 Fountains Hall, with 7 coach load, 230 tons tare, 245 tons gross
Chapter: Gresley and Thompson
p119. Table 7 [Error in table numbering: should be table 8]. Table of steam rates and drawbar-horsepower results for L.N.E.R. B1 Class 4-6-0 fired with Blidworth Coal
p119. Table 8. Table of steaming rates for L.N.E.R B1 class 4-6-0 fired with Blidworth coal
Chapter: Maunsell 4-6-0s
p123. Table 9. Southern Railway. Table of timings for the Salisbury to Exeter journey pulled by Engine No. 766 Sir Balin, load 421 tons tare, 460 tons full
p127. Table 10. Southern Railway. Table of timings for the Woking to Salisbury journey pulled by "Lord Nelson" class No. 865, "Sir John Hawkins" with a load of 13 coaches, 420 tons tare, 455 tons full
Chapter: Triumph of the Scots
p133. Table 11. Table of load hauled figures with related coal burnt per mile and coal per D.B.H.P hr. lb. and average speed figures, on the routes: Euston - Crewe with Royal Scot Claughton; Crewe - Carlisle with Royal Scott Claughton and Caprotti Claughton and Euston - Carlisle with the Royal Scott
p138. Table 12. London Midland Region, table of timings for the Crewe to Euston route pulled by 4-6-0 engine No. 46111, "Royal Fusilier" with a load of 350 tons gross
Chapter: The Great "Exchanges"
p154. Table 13. 1948 Exchanges: Average Coal Consumption related to power output. Express and General-purpose engines
p155. Table 14. 1948 Exchanges: Average Water Consumption related to power output. Express and General-purpose engines
Chapter: Finale under British Railways
p163. Table 15. British Railways Class 4 on Blidworth Coal - table of steaming rate during tests and highest drawbar-horsepower rates; with coal consumption per drawbar-horsepower-hour figures
p163. Table 16. Compares approximately the drawbar-horsepower rates between BR Standard Class 4, the Western Region modified "Hall" class and the Eastern Region B1 class working at constant speed on level at steaming rate of 18,000lb per hour

Undated, MAP. Hardcover

1966, MAP

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Evans, Martin. Manual of Model Steam Locomotive Construction. 160 pages, published by Percival Marshall in 1960. Hardcover with dustjacket. Good condition copy with dustjacket. DJ is slightly crumpled along the top edge and has a tiny nick in it on the bottom front cover. Has previous owner's name inside the front cover. Price: £34.00, not including p&p, which is Amazon's standard charge (currently £2.75 for UK orders, more for overseas customers)
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  • Manual of Model Steam Locomotive Construction [top]
    First published in 1960 in Great Britain by Percival Marshall in hardback, 158pp, red dustjacket
    1962. Revised Edition, 2nd Edition (Percival Marshall). Red dustjacket, 174pp
    1967. 3rd Edition (Model & Allied Publications), blue dustjacket
    1969. Reprint of 3rd Edition, second impression by Model & Allied Publications. Original UK retail price: 30 shillings, 172pp, blue dustjacket
    1970
    (In stock, £23). Reprint, third impression, 3rd Edition (Model & Allied Publications/MAP Technical), blue dustjacket.
    1972. Reprint, fourth impression, 3rd Edition (Model & Allied Publications)
    1974. Reprint, fifth impression, 3rd Edition (Model & Allied Publications)
    1976. Reprint, sixth impression, 3rd Edition (Model & Allied Publications), red dustjacket, ISBN 0853440867 . Original UK retail price: £4.50 net
    1978. Fourth Edition published by Model & Allied Publications in paperback, 178pp, 0852421613 . Original UK retail price for this edition: £4.75 net. Includes 36 plates of photos

Synopsis: About this Book: The book was written to provide practical help and information for engineers who build model steam locomotives of any gauge between 1.25in and 10.25 in. Each part of the locomotive is dealt with by the author, and his instructions are supplemented by drawings and photographs. Quote from dj flap: 'It is the most comprehensive book on the subject and enables builders of small locomotives to go ahead with their work with full confidence.

Chapters:
1. The Choice of Gauge & Scale
Table 1: Standards for the different gauges
Table 2: Recommended Wheel Standards

2. Types of Locomotive: 4-6-2; 4-6-0; 4-4-2; 4-4-0; 2-4-0; 2-2-2 and 4-2-2; Mixed Traffic Engines 2-6-2;2-6-0 and 4-6-0; Goods or Mineral Engines 0-6-0; 0-8-0; 2-8-0;2-8-2; Tank Locomotives; Articulated Locomotives; and Free-Lance Designs

3. General Principles of Design: Tractive Effort; Size of Cylinders; Boiler Tubes and Flues; Combustion Chambers; Superheating; Blast Pipes and Orifices; Compounding and Flash Steam Boilers
Table 3 (page 14): Recommended Working Pressures

4. Mainframes, Stretchers, Axlebones and Horns: Buffer and Drag Beams; Frame Stretchers; Hornblocks; Axleboxes; Springs for Axleboxes; Machining of Axleboxes
5. Wheels and Axles, Crank Axles, Crank Pins: Patterns for Wheels; Turning Locomotive Wheels; Drilling for Crankpins; Axles; "Quartering" of Driving Wheels; Keying the Wheels; Crank Axles; Crankpins
6. Bogies, Pony and Radial Trucks: Bogies (e.g. the Adams type, Swing-Link, simple); Pony Trucks (e.g. compensated); Radial Axleboxes, including side control springs
7. Cylinders and Details: Types of cylinder; Outside Cylinders with valves on top; Outside Cylinders with Valves Inside; Inside cylinders, valves on top; Inside Cylinders, valves underneath; Inside Cylinders with valves between; Poppet Valve Cylinders; Material for Cylinders; Valve Functions; Lap and Lead; Valve Travel; Machining Cylinders; Cutting Ports; Turning Pistons; Machining Valves for Cylinders; Cylinder Covers and Steam Chests; Glands for Stuffing Boxes; Drain Cocks and Water-release Valves; Lining up and fixing Cylinders

8. Crossheads and Motion Details: Crossheads (e.g. L.N.E.R. type, two-bar Crosshead), Slide Bars; Motion Plates (e.g. G.W.R. type Outside Motion Plate); Coupling Rods; Connecting Rods for Outside Cylinders; Inside Connecting Rods; Construction of Metal Connecting Rods; Eccentrics and Straps

9. Valve Gears: Link Motions: (e.g. Slip-eccentric valve gear; Stephenson Valve Gear); Designing Stephenson's Valve Gear for Models; Proportions of Stephenson's Valve Gear; The Point of Suspension of the Expansion Link; Full Gear Lead; Making Expansion Links; The Gooch Valve Gear; The Allan "Straight-Link" Valve Gear

10. Valve Gears: Radial Gears: Joy Valve Gear; Designing Joy Valve Gear; Construction of Joy Slide-Shafts; Hackworth Valve Gear; Walschaerts' Valve Gear; Designing Walschaerts' Gear for Models; Expansion Link Movement; The Combination Lever; Suspension of the Expansion Link; "Back-Set" of the Expansion Link; The Design of the Expansion Link; The Return Crank; The Baker Valve Gear; Gresley Valve Gear; Valve Gears for 4 Cylinder Locomotives; Poppet Valve Gears; Cab Reversing Gear

11. Boilers: Simple Boilers for "0" and "1" Gauges; Locomotive Type Boilers; Materials for Model Builders; Brazing Equipment; Building Locomotive-type Boilers; The Firebox Wrapper; The Firebox; Fireholes; Fitting Tubes to Fireboxes; Stays; Crownstays; Brick arches; Stay-less boilers; Water and steam tests

12. Boiler Fittings: Firedoors; Firegrates; Ashpans; Smokeboxes; Superheater elements; Water Gauges; Regulators; Safety Valves; Check Valves; Pressure Gauges; Steam Blowers; Snifting Valves; Steam Whistles; Turrets and Whistle Valves; Blow-Down Valves; Fusible Plugs; Boiler Expansion Joints; Chimneys and Domes

13. Lubrication, Pumps, Injectors, Brakes: Cylinder Lubrication; General Lubrication; Feed Pumps; Steam Feed (Donkey) Pumps; Injectors; Locomotive Brakes; The Steam Brake; Vacuum Brakes; Air Brakes

14. Platework, Tenders, Tanks and Fittings: Locomotive Superstructures; Water Tanks; Locomotive Details: Smokebox Saddles; Sanding Gear; Boiler Lagging and Cleading; Tenders; Engine to Tender Coupling; Buffers; Couplings; Brake Pipes

15. Fuels, Raising Steam, Driving: Oil firing; Raising Steam; Preparation for the run; Driving; Feed-Water; After the Run
Index.

The book draws on the works of well-known experts such as Mr. G. S. Willoughby (articles have appeared in Model Engineer from time to time), C.M. Keiller, "L.B.S.C" and Mr. J. N. Maskelyne. Many of the pictures are taken from Martin Evans' own models he built throughout the years.

Plates 18-19 below
Left page
Top: Lining up outside cylinders
2nd photo down: Boring piston valve cylinder using boring-bar between centres
3rd line of photos down, left: Two-bar crosshead with drop-link
3rd line of photos down, right: Piston valve cylinders for a 5in gauge model showing pistons and covers
4th line of photos down, left: "Exploded" view of a .75in scale crosshead
4th line of photos down, right: Stages in construction of motion bracket
Right page
Top: Coupling and connecting rods, .75 in scale "Britannia"
2nd photo down: A pair of connecting rods and crossheads
3rd photo down: Cutting a tapered flute in connecting rod

Evans, Martin. "Manual of Model Steam Locomotive Construction", plates 18-19

1960, P. Marshall


1962, P. Marshall

1966. MAP

1978. Special Interest Model Books

Other Model Steam Engine Building Books of Potential Interest:

Valve Gears:
Evans, Martin. 'Model Engineering', published in 1977 by Pitman Publishing Limited in hardcover with dustjacket, 210pp, ISBN 0273003801. Very good, nice, clean condition with very good unclipped dustjacket. Book has very slight curve to it from not being stored correctly in the past (hardly noticeable). Price: £34.95, not including p&p, which is Amazon's standard charge (currently £2.75 for UK customers and more for overseas buyers)
1977, Pitman
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  • Model Engineering [top]
    First published in 1977 in Great Britain by Pitman Publishing Ltd, 210pp, hardcover with dustjacket, ISBN 0273003801. Original UK retail price was £7.95

Contents: The book has been written to provide a basic guide to model engineering and is a book for the "converted" to browse in and for the newcomer to study avidly. No other book has its scope since it covers not only workshop practice, but types of models, and model engineering activities in clubs, and at rallies and exhibitions. It is lavishly illustrated with technical drawings and photographs of model engineers from many countries and it is authoritative, having been written by the editor of Model Engineer Magazine. There is a glossary of the technical terms used in the book. The book even gives advice on what to look for in a secondhand lathe, be it a Colchester 'Chipmaster' lathe or Myford 'Super Seven'
This is a wonderful book and fully recommended for the overview of this 'hobby' or professional interest.

Chapters:
Photographs; Line Drawings; Preface.
1. An Introduction to Model Engineering
2. Types of Models
3. The Home Workshop
4. Hand Tools
5. The Lathe
6. Installing and Using the Lathe
7. The Drilling Machine
8. The Grinding Machine
9. Castings, Materials and Working Drawings
10. The Joining of Metals
11. Societies, Rallies and Exhibitions
Glossary of Engineering Terms
Index

Evans, Martin. 'Model Locomotive Boilers: Their Design and Construction', published in 1976 in Great Britain in paperback, 144pp, ISBN 0852424833 or 0052424833. Condition: Good, some tanning to internal pages and a bit of dusty-dirtiness to the cover, but nothing noticeable. Very decent condition for its age. Price: £17.00, not including p&p, which is Amazon's standard charge (currently £2.75 for UK orders, more for overseas customers)
1976, Model & Allied Publications, pbk
In stock, click to buy for £17.00

Evans, Martin. 'Model Locomotive Boilers:Their Design and Construction', published by Model and Allied Publications in 1969, hardcover, 144 pages with unclipped dustjacket protected by dj protector. Very good condition copy, well looked-after and clean with some rubbing to spine edges. Price:£26.75, not including p&p, which is Amazon's standard charge (currently £2.75 for UK buyers and more for overseas customers)
1969. Model & Allied Publications
In stock, click to buy for £26.75 (not including p&p)

Evans, Martin. 'Model Locomotive Boilers: Their Design and Construction', published in 1973 by Model & Allied Publications in hardback, 144pp, ISBN  0853440220. Condition: very good clean copy with very good dustjacket. DJ has some slight crumpling to top edge & book has a couple of fingermarks inside cover. Price: £23.00, not including p&p, which is Amazon's standard charge (currently £2.75 for UK buyers, more for overseas customers)
1973. Model & Allied Publications
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  • Model Locomotive Boilers [top]
    Foreword by Professor D. H. Chaddock, C. B. E
    First published in 1969 in Great Britain by Model & Allied Publications Ltd, in hardback with dustjacket, 144pp. Original UK retail price: 35/ - (35 shillings)
    Reprinted in 1973, in a smaller size, in hardback with dustjacket, 144pp, ISBN 0853440220. Original UK retail price: £2.00 net
    Reprinted in 1976 in Great Britain as a revised edition, 144pp, paperback, ISBN 0852424833/0052424833. Original UK retail price: £3.25 net
    Contains 37 plates

About this book/synopsis: The book was written in a background of a scarcity of technical and descriptive books on the subject of the model steam locomotive and particularly so in the case of model locomotive boilers. Martin Evans could only point to the works of the late Henry Greenly and a small handbook by the late E.L. Pearce written more than 60 years previously, along with the work of his friend Mr. K.N. Harris.

The lack of materials on boilers is all the more surprising because it's the design and construction of these that causes model engineers to look for assistance and guidance. When the book was written, it was acknowledged by the author that there were many fine craftsmen around who could design and build their own chassis, but who seemed to lose confidence when it came to the boiler. Martin Evans hoped his book would give model loco builders the confidence to design and build their own boilers, completing their already finely crafted locomotives. He believed that though boiler making was very different to chassis and lathe work, it was no more difficult once unfamiliar techniques had been mastered.

The book also serves to demonstrate-the author hoped-that boiler design can be attempted without any great knowledge or experience, provided that a few simple rules are followed. The inexperienced worker should tackle each section carefully and thoroughly, examining each part as it is made or assembled and rectifying any fault that may show before proceeding to the next stage. Proceeding in this manner, there is no reason why the model engineer should not complete the boiler successfully.

The author points out that though he has stressed the safety aspect of model boilers, the strength factor can be overdone and that there is no point working to a factor of safety of more than 8 because this is wasteful of material and likely to lead to inefficiency in steam-raising. In summary, it is bad engineering. All boilers should also be tested at least once a year by competent engineers and no locomotive should be steamed in public without adequate insurance, not only against accidents to the driver or their passengers, but against possible accidents to spectators.

Contents:

Foreword & introduction
1. The Modern Locomotive Boiler
2. Designing Boilers for Models
3. Welding and Cutting
4. Silver Soldering and Brazing
5. Workshop Equipment for Boiler Work
6. The Construction of Model Boilers
7. Waters, Fuels and Combustion
8. Oil and Gas Firing
9. The Testing of Model Boilers

1969, MAP (Hardcover)

 

Evans, Martin. 'Model Locomotive Construction', published by MAP in 1974, hardcover, ISBN 0852423551, 164pp. Price: £22.00, not including p&p, which is Amazon's standard price (currently £2.75 for UK buyers and more for overseas customers)
1974, MAP, hbk
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  • Model Locomotive Construction [top]
    Foreword by John Brewer
    (electrically driven-"0" and "1" gauges)
    First published in 1974 in Great Britain in hardcover (ISBN 0852423551)

About this book/synopsis: This volume covers the construction of electrically-driven model locomotives for the popular gauges "O" and "I". The reader is taken right through the subject, starting with a review of the very large variety of full-size locomotives, and with notes of the advantages and disadvantages of modelling the different classes. The difficult subject of electric mechanism construction is dealt with in a practical manner, and other chapters include a discussion on the tools and equipment required before a start is made, the selection of suitable materials, building the bodywork, turning wheels and axles, making scale valve gear, dummy riveting, detail work, making boiler mountings, painting and lining. Illustrated.

The background to the publication of this book was that its forerunner, John Ahern's book 'Miniature Locomotive Construction' had been the locomotive modeller's bible for over 20 years and was looking dated with its emphasis on 3rd rail electrification and its lack of information on more modern methods and raw materials, adhesives, etc.

John Brewer, formerly Editor of Model Railway News has contributed the foreword.
Martin Evans in writing the book drew emphasis from the works of some distinguished model makers such as the late J.N. Maskelyne and the late J. H. Ahern, with some assistance from Mr. H. A Taylor of Bletchley. Mr. D. Pedder provided the drawings.

Click to see full picture of page 15

1974, MAP, Hardcover

1982, MAP, Paperback

Evans, Martin. 'Model Locomotive Valve Gears' published in 1981 in Great Britain by Model & Allied Publications in paperback, 102pp, ISBN 0852427697. Condition: Good condition, past it's best, but clean & tidy. Has some slight tanning to internal pages (browning effect from ageing) and some slight edge wear to the cover. Overall a very decent copy, just old. Price: £20.00, not including p&p, which is Amazon's standard charge (currently £2.75 for UK buyers, more for overseas customers)
1981, Model & Allied Publications, pbk
In stock, click to buy for £20.00, not including p&p
Evans, Martin. 'Model Locomotive Valve Gears' published by Model & Allied Publications in 1973, in paperback, 98pp, ISBN 0852421621. Sorry, sold out, but click image to access prebuilt search for this edition on Amazon
1973, Model & Allied Publications, paperback
Sorry, sold out, but click image to access prebuilt search for this edition on Amazon
Martin Evans. 'Model Locomotive Valve Gears', published in 1962 by Percival Marshall/Model & Allied Publications, hardcover, 98pp. Good+ condition copy with good+ dustjacket, with only minor wear to the dj corners and at either end of the spine. A nice copy. Price: £12.20, not including post and packaging, which is Amazon UK's standard charge (currently £2.80 for UK buyers). Overseas buyers will need to contact us to arrange a sale
1962, Percival Marshall, hardback
In stock, click image above to buy for £12.20 (not including p&p)

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  • Model Locomotive Valve Gears [top]
    First published in June 1962 in Great Britain by Percival Marshall (subsequently Model & Allied Publications) in hardback with dustjacket, 98pp, no ISBN
    Reprinted in 1967 by Model & Allied Publications in hardback with dustjacket
    Reprinted in 1973 by Model & Allied Publications in paperback (for the first time), 98pp, ISBN 0852421621. Original UK retail price: £1.00 net
    Reprinted in 1981 in Great Britain as a revised edition, in paperback, 102pp, ISBN 0852427697, but with the ISBN of the 1973 edition still on the back cover, but with an Argus Books sticker over the top. Original UK retail price: £4.50 net

About this book/synopsis: This book deals with all the well known, and several lesser known, valve gears in details, with instructions and hints for the builder of model. The book is well illustrated with drawings and pictures and is a practical book which deals comprehensively with a subject which gives rise to many queries among those building model locomotives. It is essential to all interested in steam locomotives.

The cylinders and valve gear of the steam locomotive are probably the most important components of the whole machine. Were it not for the valves which distribute the steam to the cylinders, and the valve gear that controls them, a locomotive could not move at all. However large and efficient the boiler fitted, or however much high-pressure steam may be available, unless the valves and valve gear are properly designed and accurately fitted, the locomotive will be a failure. This book helps with the design of valve gears and the best proportions of cylinders and valves; it also makes use of the basic material in Martin Evans' previous book Manual of Model Steam Locomotive Construction.

The book revises this material and adds extra information and data; additional valve types have been included as well, including some of the special types with poppet valves. Drawings from the Manual have been revised and many new ones included so that the various components for the different scales and gauges can be properly proportioned. Martin Evans draws upon the works of well-known authorities such as Mr. C.M. Keiller, Mr. K. N. Harris, L.B.S.C , J. N. Maskelyne, Henry Greenly, G.S. Willoughby and C.S.Lake, whose articles have appeared from time to time in the pages of Model Engineer & whose books are still available from good secondhand book stockists.

Chapters:
1. Basic proportions
2. Single-eccentric and slip-eccentric gears
3. The Stephenson link valve gear
4. The Gooch and Allan straight-link valve gears
5. Radial valve gears (1)
6. Radial valve gears (2)
7. Valve gears for three- and four-cylinder engines
8. Poppet valve gears
9. Cab reversing gear, valve-setting and the indicator

Valve Gears Covered:
Allan
Baker
Beames
Caprotti
Cossart
Gooch
Greenly's Corrected
Hackworth
Joy
Marshall
Stephenson
Walschaerts'

 

Evans, Martin. 'Model Locomotive Valve Gears', p28, Allan straight-link valve gear
The Allan Straight-Link Valve Gear, p28 - click to view

Other books on the topic:
Evans, Martin. 'The Model Steam Locomotive: A Complete Treatise on Design and Construction by Martin Evans', published in 2010 in Great Britain by TEE Publishing, in paperback, 208pp, ISBN 1857611322. Condition: Brand new. Price: £25.20, not including post and packing, which is Amazon's standard charge (currently £2.80 for UK buyers, more for overseas customers)
2010, TEE Publishing, pbk. 5 copies In stock, click image above to buy for £23.00, not including post and packing, which is £2.80 for UK buyers, more for overseas customers. Overseas customers will need to buy our £28.00 copy

Evans, Martin. 'The Model Steam Locomotive: A Complete Treatise on Design and Construction', published by Nexus Special Interests, 1998, paperback, 208pp, ISBN 0852428170. Click image to access prebuilt search for this title on Amazon, which will include any listings we have
1983, Argus Books, pbk (same design for later editions). 3 in stock: £20, £20, and £20.75

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Alibris, Inc.

  • The Model Steam Locomotive: A Complete Treatise on Design and Construction [top]
    First published in 1983 in Great Britain by Argus Books (Model & Allied Publications) in paperback, 208pp, ISBN 0852428170. Original UK retail price of the 1983 edition: £9.95 net
    Reprinted 1986
    (original retail price: £10.95), 1987, 1989, 1991, 1994
    Reprinted in 1998 by Nexus Special Interests (same no. of pages, ISBN etc)
    Reprinted in 2010 in Great Britain in paperback, 208pp, ISBN 1857611322 by TEE Publishing, The Fosse, Fosse Way, Leamington Spa, Warwickshire, CV31 1XN.
    A Note on the 2010 edition: This is a reprint of earlier editions with the small addition of a note about health & safety legislation (that is the enjoyment of building your own live steam engine, and the methods and techniques described in the book might conflict with health & safety legislation, which has led the publishers to state that they therefore do not endorse Martin Evans' methods...). The cover of the 2010 paperback edition is quite thin and flimsy, which Slightly Better Books believes will not stand the test of workshop or time (and makes us wonder about the quality of the binding), but it does at least represent investment for the future in this standard, master text on the subject of building your own model steam locomotive.

About the book:
This book is an updated version of Martin Evan's earlier standard work The Manual of Model Steam Locomotive Construction (above). Packed with illustrations, photos, diagrams and tables of data, it looks at the following:
1) Gauge and Scale
2) Types of Steam Locomotive: 4-6-4; 4-6-2; 4-6-0; 4-4-2; 4-4-0; 2-4-0; 2-2-2; 4-2-2; 4-6-0; 2-6-2; 2-6-0 "Mogul"; 2-8-2; 2-8-0; 0-8-0; 0-6-0; other small tender engines; tank locomotives; articulated locomotives; free-lance designs
3) Workshop Equipment
4) General Principles of Design. Tractive effort; size of cylinders; size of barrel; superheating; compounding; flash steam boilers; recent developments
5) Mainframes, Stretchers, axleboxes and horns. Details of main frames; buffer beams; machining axleboxes; frame stretchers
6) Wheels, axles and crankpins. Patterns for wheels; turning wheels; finishing operations; drilling for crankpins; quartering
7) Crank-axles. Loctite Method
8) Bogies, pony trucks and radial trucks
9) Cylinders. Balanced slide valves; steam passages; materials for cylinders; machining cylinders; pistons; drain cocks & relief valves; lining-up cylinders
10) Crossheads, slide bars and motion plates
11) Coupling rods, connecting rods, eccentrics and straps
12) Valve gears-single & slip eccentric gears
13) The link-valve gears. Stephenson valve gear with locomotive-type link; Stephenson valve gear outside the frames; designing Stephenson valve gear; proportions of Stephenson valve gear; point of suspension of expansion link; full gear lead; construction of Stephenson valve gear; the Gooch valve gear; the Allan "straight-link" valve gear
14) Walschaerts and Joy Valve Gears. Designing Walschaerts valve gear; Walschaerts' valve gear for piston valve cylinders; Walschaerts' valve gear for slide valve cylinder; suspension of the expansion link; backset of the expansion link; the return crank; the Baker valve gear; designing baker gear for models; the Jones' valve gear; the Beames' valve gear; Greenly's corrected motion; the Baguley valve gear; the Joy Valve Gear; Designing Joy Valve Gear; Construction of Joy Slide-Shafts; Joy Valve Gear for Outside Cylinders; Hackworth Valve Gear; Marshall Valve Gear
15) Valve Gears for 3 & 4 cylinder locomotives. Churchward's "Scissors" Valve Gear; Diagram of Holcroft arrangement for 4 cylinder engine, cranks at 135 degrees; Deeley Cross-Drive valve gear (diagram); Gresley Conjugated valve gear (diagram); Conjugated Motions for Three-Cylinder Locomotives
16) Cab Reversing Gears, valve settings and the indicator
17) Boilers. Locomotive type boilers; materials for model locomotive boilers; brazing equipment; silver solders and brazing alloys; the design of model locomotive boilers; the firebox; strength of boiler plates; the tubes and flues; staying; firehole ring; firegrates; ashpans; combustion chambers; thermic syphons; brick arches; fusible plugs; boiler construction; taper barrels
18) Smokeboxes, superheaters, boiler fittings. Looks also at safety valves, regulators (slide-valve, Stroudley, double-handle design), water gauges, Cottam water gauge, Check (Clack) Valves, steam blowers, snifting valves, blowdown valves, steam whistles, turrets or manifolds, boiler expansion joints, chimneys and domes
19) Lubrication, pumps, injectors, brakes. Cylinder lubrication, sight feed lubrication system, mechanical lubricator, boiler feed, axle-driven pump, steam feed pumps, how to fit up injectors, locomotive brakes, the steam brake, vacuum brakes, steam brake cylinders, air brakes
20) Platework, tenders, tanks, fittings. Locomotive superstructures, water tanks, engine to tender coupling, smokebox saddles, lagging and cleading, sanding gear, gravity sanding gear, locomotive details, buffers, couplings, brake pipes
21) Painting, nameplates fuels, feed water, raising steam, driving. Includes a look at miniature name and number plates, preparation for the run, after the run

Indexed

Tables:
Table 1. Standards for the different gauges
Table 2. Gauge, scale & conversion factor in imperial and metric
A further table below gives data in imperial and metric on gauge; back to back; tyre width; flange depth; root radius; flange radius; chamfer; tread diameter point; m/cg dimension; flange way

 

Other potential works of interest:

 

 

Evans, Martin. 'Outdoor Model Railways', published in 2011 in Great Britain (reprint) in paperback, 100pp, ISBN 1857611373. Condition: New. Price: £20.00, not including post and packing, which is Amazon UK's standard charge (currently £2.80 for UK buyers, more for overseas customers)
2011, TEE Publishing, pbk
In stock, click to buy for £20.00, not including post and packing
Evans, Martin. 'Outdoor Model Railways', published in 1970 in Great Britain by Model & Allied Publications in hardback, 100pp. Sorry, sold out, but click image to access prebuilt search for this title on Amazon UK
1970, Model & Allied Publications
In stock, click image above to buy for £11.00 not including post and packing (£2.80 for UK orders)

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  • Outdoor Model Railways [top]
    First published in 1970 in Great Britain by Model & Allied Publications in hardback, 100pp. Original UK retail price £2.00; later £3.00
    Reprinting in 2011 in Great Britain by TEE Publishing, in paperback, 100pp, ISBN 1857611373

Contents: This book assembles a remarkable collection of pictures of outdoor railways with expert text of the construction, operation and development of such operations. Martin Evans was well known for his 3.5 inch, 5 inch and 7.25 inch gauge steam loco designs, with the 7.25 inch being probably the largest size that can be tackled by an amateur model engineer. These are the popular sizes of steam loco for home and club operation and it is for this reason that this book mainly focuses on those gauges.

Every aspect of outdoor model railways is covered from siting and layout, track, foundations, bridges and tunnels, stations and station buildings, through to such things as signalling, rolling stock, passenger carrying and passenger cars and finally onto the important club angle of public liability (as it was in 1970, so up to date info should be looked out). It's a very detailed book packed with hints, tips, facts and figures and illustrations.

Chapters:
1. Sites and scales

Climatic conditions; sites; soils, scales; Fine Scale "o" gauge; Narrow Gauge Railways
2.Track layout
Sheds; Gradients and Curves; General Arrangements
3. Foundations
4. Viaducts, bridges and tunnels
5. Stations and station buildings

Windows; Station Decorations; Station Lighting; Signal Boxes
6. Track and track laying
Sleepers and Battens; Curved Track; Pointwork; Ballasting; Super-elevation
7. Signalling
Siting of Signals; Methods of Operation
8. Locomotives and electrification
Clockwork locomotives; Steam Locomotives; Electric Locomotives
9. Rolling stock
Painting of Locomotives; Springing
10. Passenger-carrying railways
Raised Tracks; Portable Tracks; Permanent Raised Tracks; Wooden Construction; Metal Construction; Brick and Concrete Construction; Rails for Permanent Tracks; Sleepers; Rail Joints; Layout of the Track; Sidings and Turntables
11. Ground level tracks
Pointwork; Super-elevation;Transition Curves
12. Passenger cars
Derailments; Brakes; Wheels; axle bearings; Springing; Couplings
13. Signalling for passenger-carrying
Manual signalling; Automatic signalling; Automatic Circuitry
14. Public running: Legal Liability

Chapter 13 includes tables of standard dimensions:
a) Wheel dimensions for O-Gauge (Coarse); oF Gauge (Fine), 1-Gauge and 1F-Gauge (Fine) and the limits
b) Wheels on Axles standard dimensions for O-Gauge (Coarse); oF Gauge (Fine), 1-Gauge and 1F-Gauge (Fine) and the limits
c) Standard dimensions for Bullhead Rail for oF-Gauge (Fine); o Gauge (Coarse), 1-Gauge and 1F-Gauge (Fine)
d) Standard dimensions for Flat Bottom Rail for oF-Gauge (Fine); o Gauge (Coarse), 1-Gauge and 1F-Gauge (Fine)
e) Standard dimensions for Track standards for oF-Gauge (Fine), o-Gauge (Coarse), 1-Gauge and 1F-Gauge (Fine)
f) Standard dimensions for Conductor Rail Spacing for 3-Rail Electrification for o-gauge, 1-Gauge and 1F-Gauge
g) Summary of Gauges and Scales for o-gauge, oF-Gauge (Fine), 1-Gauge (44.45) and 1F-Gauge (Fine)
h) Loading Gauge Dimensions

Photographs and Diagrams:
The photos in the book work very well giving the reader a good idea of what other railway modellers have done when building their outside or outside and inside layouts, e.g. there's photo of a Mr Featherstone's Gauge "0" railway in North Walsham with main running track and sidings.

The photos show wooden construction, articulated bases, asbestos base (not recommended these days), the use of longitudinal battens and roofing felt between the longitudinal planks, third-rail system, pointwork, electrification, how to arrange reinforcement in model concrete structures (diagram), wooden "shuttering" for casting concrete bridges and tunnels (diagram), steel plate girder bridges (diagram), A "N" type lattice girder bridge (diagram), flat-bottom rail on wooden longitudinals, basic signalling for a simple station layout (diagram), signalling for a double junction (diagram), a braking ramp for clockwork locomotives inter-connected with starter signal (diagram), concrete viaduct trackwork, brick piles, Illshaw Heath track, Guildford Society's track, the North London Society's Tyttenhanger station, construction of an all-metal permanent track (diagram), construction of wooden portable track (diagram), details of a "traverser" for locomotives of 3.5 in. gauge and 5 in. gauge, level crossing, tunnels, safety stirrup and tube for passenger cars, a safety coupling for passenger cars (diagram), wiring diagrams for signalling, turntable construction, water tower construction, Lord Gretton's Stapleford Park Railway (the Stapleford Miniature Railway) and the all important signal box

List of Drawings
1. Determining the levels on a small site
2. Concrete trough foundation for gauge 0 / 1 garden railways
3. Concrete base for timber track support
4. Packing strips for adjustment of level
5. Shuttering for making concrete viaduct sections
6. Reinforcement for concrete viaducts
7. Steel plate girder bridge
8. Lattice girder bridge
9. Hardwood jig for track making
10. A simple track gauge
11. Trammel for laying sleepers on curved track
12. Bonding for ends of rails for electric railways
13. Point blade ends
14. Semaphore signal arm, bearing and lamp
15. Basic signalling for simple station layout
16. Signalling a double junction
17. Pneumatic operation of signals
18. Braking ramp for clockwork locomotives
19. Externally-fired model steam locomotive
20. Internally-fired model steam locomotive
21. Portable steel track
22. Permanent track as used by Leyland, Preston and District Society of Model Engineers (S.M.E)
23 & 23a Portable track details
24. Permanent track with wooden superstructure
25. Permanent track built entirely from metal sections
26. Permanent track with concrete uprights
27. Surveying the site for the track layout
28. Traverser
29. Dumpy Level
30. Hull Society rail-bending tool (block made)
31. Construction of ground-level track
32. Details of a turnout (*to follow)
33. Transition curves
34. Safety stirrup and guide for passenger cars
35. Equalised bogies
36. Springing for a passenger car bogie
37. Safety coupling hook for passenger car
38. Simple coupling for use between passenger cars
39; 40; 41: Some layouts for locomotive sidings on raised track
42. 2-aspect signal
43. 3-aspect signal
44. Battery symbols
45. Signalling for simple continuous track
46. Single pole-double throw switch
47. Wiring for three 2-aspect signals
48. Circuit for three 2-aspect signals
49. Double pole-double throw switch
50. Wiring for manually-operated signals, 3 signals, 3-aspects
51. Circuit for manually-operated signals, 3 signals, 3-aspects
52. Typical P.O type relay
53. Section through relay contacts
54. Front view of relay
55. Types of contacts used in automatic signalling
56. Sequence of make and break with contacts
57. Shows gap left in one rail with automatic signalling
58. Bonding of running rails
59. Circuit for three 3-aspect signals, operating on the loop system
60. A simple form of track contact
61. Microswitch
62. Circuit for three 3-aspect signals, operating on the track contact system
63. Track mimic panel
64. Solenoid for operating semaphore signals
65. Use of modified electric bell for signalling
66. Standard dimensions
67. Plan of the Beech Hurst permanent track
68. Gradient profile of the Stapleford Miniature Railway, a 10.25 inch gauge line in Leicestershire

Photographs (names in brackets indicate who took the photograph):
Chapter 1: Sites & Scales
-A view on the Gauge "0" garden railway of Mr. Featherstone of North Walsham. Train leaving the indoor part of the line
-Work in progress on Mr. Featherstone's Gauge "0" garden railway: relaying sidings
-Another view of Mr. Featherstone's railway: note asbestos base on 3 in. * 1in. timbers
[IMPORTANT: DO NOT USE ASBESTOS FOR ANY ASPECTS OF MODEL RAILWAY CONSTRUCTION. THIS PHOTO ILLUSTRATES OUTDATED AND OBSOLETE PRACTICE]
-a fine Gauge "0" garden railway with wooden construction (Photo by Model Railway News)
-Another view of the Gauge "0" garden railway: G.W.R. 4-6-0 on passenger train (Model Railway News)
-Gauge "0" North London 0-6-0 tank with twin articulated coach set (Model Railway News)
-View of the longitudinal battens and roofing felt between longitudinal cross-planking (Model Railway News)
-L.N.E.R. B.1 class 4-6-0 pulling a train of teak coaches (yes teak!!) on a model circuit. (Shame the photo is not in colour!)
Chapter 2. Track Layout -No photographs
Chapter 3. Foundations
-Gauge "0" L.M.S. "Princess" Pacific pulling a mail train. The line is electrified on a third-rail system in the centre of the track (Model Railway News)
-A photograph of M. Ritz's Gauge "0" outdoor line under construction on a plot of land behind a line of houses (Martin Evans)
-Another view of M. Ritz's outdoor railway in Paris (Martin Evans)
-This photographs shows the pointwork on M. Ritz's line. He added electrification on the overhead system later (Martin Evans)
Chapter 4. Viaducts, Bridges and Tunnels - no photos
Chapter 5. Stations and Station Buildings

-A fine achievement by A. A. Sherwood of Sydney, Australia: a Gauge "O" steam-driven Mallet locomotive. Note the track on longitudinal timbers with brick uprights
-A 3.5 inch gauge ground-level line in Germany built by F. Grosse-Holtfort
-A view of the steaming bays at a meeting of the New Jersey (U.S.A.) Live Steamers. The stock are 3.5 inch and 4.5 inch gauges (Conrad Milster)
-A view of the 3.5 inch gauge line of AI Millburn, Connecticut, U.S.A. Note the deep section rail (D. H. Downie)
-A ground level line in Germany: Adolf Lallinger of Pasing, near Munich, prepares for a run with his 0-6-0 tank locomotive, which is fitted with Allan valve gear
-An American "Ten-Wheeler" on the New Jersey railroad. Flat-bottom rail on wooden superstructure (Conrad Milster)
-Another example of a raised permanent track with wooden longitudinals and flat bottom rail. The rail appears to be very light in section for passenger carrying. The locomotive is a most unusual type, one of the early Camelbacks, built by Mr. G. R. Thomas of Havertown Pennsylvania
-A view of the old Chingford track; steel flats were used for the rails and concrete longitudinals and uprights. The late H. J. Turpin is at the controls of the Society's 4-4-2 locomotive "Firefly" (C. B. Capener)
Chapter 6. Track and Track Laying - no photos
Chapter 7. Signalling
-An American "Ten-Wheeler" in 3.5 in. gauge, built by A. W. Leggett of St. Lambert, P.Q., Canada. Steelangle rails on wooden sleepers
-A ground-level line for 3.5 in. and 5 in. gauge in South Africa. The locomotiveis to the "Caribou" design, built by Mrs. Yvette Etter
-Another view of the New Jersey railroad, showing a Reading "Pacific" and a Mallet in the background
-A view on the track of the North London Society of Model Engineers. This track uses wooden longitudinals and concrete uprights. Mr. Hatherill is seen driving Bill Carter's Great Northern "Atlantic". The signal on the left is a full-size somersault signal from the old Great Northern Railway (G. M. Cashmore)
-A portable steel track belonging to the Guildford Model Engineering Society
-Mr Harold Pill inspecting G. M. Cashmore's 5 in. gauge "George V" at the North London Society's track at Colney Heath. The track is laid on wooden longitudinals with concrete uprights
-Another view of the steaming bays at a meeting of the New Jersey live steamers (Conrad Milster)
Chapter 8. Locomotives and Electrification
-The author's "Firefly" seen on the track of the Chesterfield Model Engineering Society. The rails are of flat steel bar and the uprights are of brick construction
-A permanent outdoor track in 3.5 in. gauge built in the form of a continuous concrete viaduct with flat bottom rails laid on wooden sleepers. The locomotive is J. H. Owen's Southern Railway Pacific "Hartland"
-The track of the Hull Society during construction. Note the traverser running on rails at right angles to the main line
-On the Beech Hurst track of the Sussex Miniature Locomotive Society. Bill Carter is seen driving his famous "Atlantic" with K. N. Harris (the author of the Model Boiler books) and G. W. Wildy as passenger
-A 5 in. gauge "Britannia" at work on a ground-level line in Australia
-A view on the track of the Witney Society at Blenheim Park. The track is laid on full-size railway sleepers laid longitudinally. The author is seen at the controls of Mr. Bott's 4-6-4 tank locomotive
Chapter 9. Rolling Stock - no photos
Chapter 10. Passenger-Carrying Railways

-An outdoor line in New Brunswick, Canada, built with timber longitudinals and concrete uprights. The late Bob Baird with his 3.5 inch gauge L.M.S. "Pacific".
-A fine bridge on the narrow gauge 16.5mm track belonging to Mr. W. A. D. Strickland
-John Hurst of the Sydney Live Steamers and his 5 in. gauge 4-8-2 locomotive crossing a three-span steel girder bridge
-Passing through the cutting on the Guildford Society's track. Note the overbridge (photograph by the author)
-A picturesque station at Illshaw Heath on the track of the Birmingham Society of Model Engineers (J. Balleny)
-A view on the track of the North London Society, showing Tyttenhanger Station. Note the lamps and water columns (G. M. Cashmore)
-Photo of a meeting of the New Jersey Live Steamers, U.S.A., showing a 3.5 in. gauge "Mogul" and a "Mallet"
-A 5 in. gauge L.M.S. 4-6-0 Jubilee class locomotive on the permanent track of the Rugby Society, which uses [used] steel flats for rails with concrete viaduct foundation (Martin Evans)
-A meeting of the South Australia Society of Model and Experimnetal Engineers, showing permanent tracks for 2.5, 3.5, and 5 in. gauges and boating pond
-A picture taken on the old ground-level track of the Derby Society of Model Engineers, showing locomotive sidings
-Another view of the permanent track of the Rugby Society, showing concrete uprights with wooden blocks for adjustment (Martin Evans)
-A heavy load of young passengers seen on the old track of the Chingford & District Society. The locomotive is the club's Atlantic "Firefly" (C. B. Capener)
-Photo of Mr. Harper's old track at Bromley, showing a 2-10-0 locomotive on the turntable. A King Arthur Class 4-6-0 is seen on the right, and a passenger truck on the left (Martin Evans)
-Group Captain Law raising steam on a 5 in. gauge 2-10-0 locomotive at Mr. Harper's track at Bromley, Kent (now sadly dismantled) (Martin Evans)
-A pivoted bridge or traverser on a 5 in. gauge outdoor railway, constructed mainly of steel tubing
-A fine concrete bridge on Mr. Harper's old track at Bromley Kent (Martin Evans)
-Close up photo of "breather switches" in the track of the North London Society. The "breather" switches allow for expansion and are fitted at regular intervals of approximately 160ft
Chapter 11. Ground Level Tracks
-A lattice girder bridge supported on stone abutments on Mr. Harper's track at Bromley (Martin Evans)
-Another picture taken on the North London Society's track. The rail joints are brazed together using .5 in. channel section 3 inches long. After brazing, the joint is zinc painted. The picture shows a joint before painting. (G. M. Cashmore)
-Photograph shows a level crossing gate and garden shed on Mr. Harper's old railway at Bromley (Martin Evans)
-This picture shows the construction of the track built by the Urmston Society. The concrete pillars are 15 in. high with a 12 inch square tapering base, tapering towards the top
-Further work on the North London extension. Note wire reinforcements before cementing (G. M. Cashmore)
-A steel tube is put through the centre so that a 'J' bolt can be placed through to bolt the channel to the pillar
-Martin Evans driving on the new track of the Bournemouth Society of Model Engineers (in heavy rain!)
-Work in progress on the new extension of the North London Society's track. Shutter boards are placed at each side of the supporting sleepers and nailed in position. The nail heads are left proud for easy removal of the boards after cementing
-A section of the main line on the North London Society's track at Colney Heath, showing the construction (G. M. Cashmore)
-A photograph taken after the rebuilding of the track of the Chingford and District Society, showing the unusual bridge
-A sweep of multiple-gauge track curving round to dash under a small brick-built overbridge
-Part of the track of the Guildford Society, showing concrete uprights and steel rail construction (Martin Evans)
-the North London Society of Model Engineers built a special saw for slotting the sleepers to take the rails to suit the 3.5 and 5 inch gauges. Twelve sleepers are slotted in one operation (G. M. Cashmore)
-unusual double-swing gates with the track going across the top of them, allowing access to the centre of the track on the layout of the Guildford Model Society. Concrete has been laid in a quarter circle for the wheels supporting the bridge spans to work
-view of the Guildford Society's track showing a traverser, loco sidings and water tower (Martin Evans)
-Superb tunnel mouth in brick with brick arch built by members of the North London society of Model Engineers. The layout at this point possesses a colour light signal and gradient post!
Chapter 12. Passenger Cars
-This picture shows the very fine traverser belonging to the Birmingham S.M.E at its Illshaw Heath base. The traverser runs at right angles to the track and its construction avoids having to make a break in the main line
-Shows the new North London Society's extension in a view looking towards the new bottom curve; the left-hand line shows sleepers already screeded awaiting the track. On the right is the 'contractor's' line for delivery of materials to site
-The brazed joints of the rails are done in pairs held temporarily by clips. Five 16ft lengths of rail are joined before being laid in the sleepers permanently. After laying, the long lengths are themselves brazed (Dave Chisnall)
-Further work on the North London extension: laying screed between the shuttering. Left to right: Bill Thrale, Dave Chisnall and Peter Roake (G. M. Cashmore)
-A view of the locomotive sidings at the Illshaw Heath track of the Birmingham Society
-A fine stretch of the straight track on the new Bournemouth layout (photo taken during construction)
-Another view of the Birmingham Society's traverser
-North London Society: the photo shows the traverser in position over the main line. The traverser runs on rails laid at right angles to the track and the bar beneath the traverser operates the somersault signal (G. M. Cashmore)
-Part of the track of the Sussex Miniature Locomotive Society at Beech Hurst (photo taken during construction)
-A ground level 3.5 in. gauge railway under construction by Mr. F. Grosse-Holtfort, in Germany
-A ground level 7.25 in. gauge track at New Malden: the Southern Locomotive 5259 is Mr. G. C. Smith's Southern Railway 2-6-0
-An early photograph of the Sussex Miniature Locomotive Society's track at Beech Hurst whilst it was under construction
-A view of the new Bournemouth track showing the site for the station (Martin Evans)
-Picture taken during construction of the new track of the Urmstone Model Engineering Society
- A view of a junction on the 7.25 in. gauge Derwent Valley Railway, a ground-level line near Newcastle (Ken Swan)
Chapter 13. Signalling for Passenger-Carrying Railways

-three open bogie passenger cars seen on the 7.25 in. gauge Hilton Valley Railway (HVR)
-a view of the Hilton Valley line showing articulated passenger cars
-L.M.S. 0-6-0 7161 and private owner wagon EMR 1952 on the 7.25 in. gauge line of the Brighouse Society. The coal wagon has been adapted as a driver's seat
-an open private owner wagon, a covered wagon and working water crane at the Derwent Valley Railway (Ken Swan)
-two four-wheel passenger cars on the permanent outdoor line of the Mr. Wilkinson of Kilmaconogue, Ireland
-A 5 in. gauge "Springbok" 4-6-0 locomotive to the author's design built by E. C. Dearman of Hazelbrook, New South Wales. Note construction of turntable (E. C. Dearman)
-A covered passenger bogie car on the 7.25 in. gauge Hilton Valley Railway
-Mr. G. C. Smith's Southern Railway 2-6-0 locomotive on the New Malden 7.25 in. gauge ground-level line
-The construction of the traverser built by the North London Society of Model Engineers (G. M. Cashmore)
-A view on the Brighouse 7.25 in. gauge railway, showing passenger cars and track construction
-water tower alongside the track of the Birmingham Society at Illshaw Heath
-The largest standard gauge used by miniature railways is 15 inches. Here is the Pacific "Green Goddess" on the Romney, Hythe and Dymchurch Railway (Martin Evans)
-A heavy load on the Lord Gretton's miniature railway at Stapleford Park (Thames Television)
-Building a bridge for the railway to cross over a cutting at Lord Gretton's Stapleford Park (Ian Allan)
-About to board a train on the Stapleford Miniature Railway (Ian Allan)
-Photo of Lord Gretton and designer David Curwen looking over (with pride) a 10.25 in. gauge "diesel" locomotive on the Stapleford Miniature Railway with a Stapleford Miniature Railway Engineers Dep.t van behind them
-A view of Lord Gretton's miniature railway during the filming of the television series "The Avengers" (Thames Television)
-Mr. J. Liversage's traverser with engine on top of it
-During the filming of "The Avengers" at Stapleford Park, another pictures was taken of an SMR 4-4-2 designed by David Curwen in steam
-Photo of Stapleford Junction signal box on the Stapleford Miniature Railway (Lord Gretton)
-Photograph taken by Martin Evans looking out of the side of a Romney, Hythe & Dymchurch carriage (RH&D) back towards Hythe station
-A point lever outside Hythe station on the Romney, Hythe & Dymchurch
-A close-up showing the wheel and bearings of the well type turntable on the Romney, Hythe and Dymchurch Railway
-Water tower at Hythe station on the Romney, Hythe & Dymchurch (Martin Evans)
-A view on the Goleta Valley Line in California. This is one of the finest 7.5 in. gauge railroads in the U.S.A
Chapter 14. Public Running: Legal Liability
-Photograph showing the construction of the turnouts on the Romney, Hythe & Dymchurch. The reader should note how the tie-rods are connected to the point blades (Martin Evans)
-Photo showing an unusual bogie passenger vehicle on the Romney, Hythe & Dymchurch - not the "instanter" couplings and vacuum brake pipes (Martin Evans)
-Photo of some of the point work outside Hythe Station on the the Romney, Hythe & Dymchurch Railway - a train about to leave is headed by one of Henry Greenly's favourite "Pacifics", "Southern Maid" (Martin Evans)
-Photo of an empty well-type turntable arrangement for the 15 in. gauge Romney, Hythe & Dymchurch Railway. The engine sheds and workshops are at the back of the picture
-Close-up of one of the turnouts on the Romney, Hythe & Dymchurch Railway, showing point-rodding, angle cranks and guides (Martin Evans)
-A fine turntable on the 7.5 in. gauge Goleta Valley Line in California. U. S. A.
- Five bridge types: Steel girder bridge over the River Lea, built for the former Midland Railway; another view of the same bridge; lattice girder bridge built for the former Great Eastern Railway, crossing the River at Walthamstow. Also an early plate girder bridge crossing a tributary of the the River Lea near Walthamstow, built for the former Great Eastern railway. Also there's a photo of the lattice girder bridge (Martin Evans)

 

Other Books on Outdoor Model Railways

 

Live Steam in the Garden!

 

Model Railway Societies

 

Model Engineering

 

Model Railway Track Laying:

 

Passenger-Carrying Model Railways

 

Operating Model Railways

 

Beginner's Guides to Model Railways



Garden Railways

Evans, Martin. 'Pacific Steam: The British Pacific Locomotive', published in 1961 by Percival Marshall, 1st Edition, with dustjacket, 80pp. No ISBN. Condition: Good, with some light tanning & dustiness to dustjacket, with some rubbing to the edges. Overall good, clean condition. Price: £5.75, not including p&p, which is Amazon's standard charge (currently £2.75 for UK buyers, more for overseas customers)
Percival Marshall, 1961, hardcover, w/dj
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About this book/synopsis: The first Pacific locomotive was built in the U.S. in 1886, but 22 years passed before this class of locomotive appeared in Britain. The first Pacific to appear over here was 'The Great Bear', designed by Mr. G. J. Churchward; and it first saw service in 1908. The Pacific was one of the most successful types of engines to be used on Britain's railways and more than 400 locomotives were built in England.

The author was himself witness to the new Gresley Pacifics' increasing appearances on the old Great Northern main line, having watched the trains from the vantage points of the footpaths between Finsbury Park and Harringay; and between Harringay and Hornsea. It was in later years that he saw and liked the A4 Pacifics; and extended his interest to the other Pacific type locomotives such as the L.M.S. "Princesses", "Duchesses"; the Southern Region "Merchant Navy" and "West Country"; and the Class 6, 7 and 8 locomotives of the nationalised entity British Railways.

Written for the ordinary enthusiast, or model engineer, the author tells the fascinating story of the many different types of Pacific locomotive constructed in England and compares their dimensions and their performance on the track. He also looks at the history of their development, trials, troubles and successes and the book includes five tables of information include leading dimensions, steaming rates, coal and water consumption, speeds on runs, etc. The book is well illustrated with a fine collection of photographs. The author points out that he has not covered rebuilds and modifications, since this would have taken many more volumes to cover in any detail.

To add to the historical value of this book and the sheer amount of experience and knowledge put into it, the foreword has been contributed by Mr. R. A. Riddles, formerly full-time member of the Railway Executive responsible for mechanical and electrical engineering, and President of the Institute of Locomotive Engineers in 1950-1951.

Chapters:
1. "The Great Bear";
2. The First Gresley Pacific and the Raven Pacifics
3. Development of the Gresley Pacifics
4. Thompson and Peppercorn Locomotives
5. Stanier Pacifics
6. The Southern Joins In
7. Pacifics of British Railways

Illustrations (photos-all black & white):
1. Britain's first Pacific locomotive, "The Great Bear", in its unmodified state
2. G.W.R. No. 111, "The Great Bear", in its modified state
3. G.N.R locomotive No. 1470 "Great Northern", the first Pacific from Nigel Gresley
4. North Eastern Railway No. 2400 Pacific as built by Raven
5. L.N.E.R No. 2404 Pacific, reboilered by Gresley
6. L.N.E.R. Class A3 locomotive No. 2596 "Manna"
7. Class A3, 1928, Doncaster-built No. 60094 in British Railways livery with Gresley's special steam collector fitted
8. L.N.E.R. Class A4 4-6-2 locomotive No. 4489 "Dominion of Canada"
9. L.N.E.R. Class A4 4-6-2 No. 4496 "Dwight D. Eisenhower" (formerly "Golden Shuttle"). This has the distinction of having been the first A4 Pacific to be restored to pre-war garter blue livery
10. Class A4 locomotive, 1938, Doncaster-built No. 60022 "Mallard" in British Railways livery, fitted with Kylchap blast pipe and double chimney. (Works No. 1870)
11. Class A3 Pacific (Gresley) No. 60110 with modified chimney (fitted under the direction of Mr. K. J. Cook) in British Railways livery
12. Class A2/2 locomotive No. 60501 "Cock o' the North" in British Railways livery, which was rebuilt from Class P2 2-8-2 in 1943
13. N. E. Class A/2/1 locomotive No. 3696 (Thompson's 6ft. 2in. Pacific Class)
14. L.N.E.R., May 1946, Doncaster-built Class A2 4-6-2 No. 500 locomotive "Edward Thompson", 2000th engine built by that works
15. L.N.E.R Class A2 4-6-2 locomotive No. 525, "A.H. Peppercorn"
16. L.M.S. Pacific No. 6201 "Princess Elizabeth" in her as-built state
17. L.M.S Pacific No. 6202, Stanier's experimental turbine-driven Pacific
18. L.M.S Pacific No. 6231, "Duchess of Atholl", Class 7P 4-6-2 express passenger engine, of the Princess Coronation class, fitted with double chimney
19. L.M.S Pacific No. 6235, "City of Birmingham", of the Princess Coronation class, with streamlining. In June 1946, the streamlining was removed and smoke deflectors were fitted.
20. Class 7P, 1947, Crewe-built "Sir William Stanier" in British Railways livery
21. Southern Railways No. 21C12 "Merchant Navy" class locomotive "United States Lines"
22. Southern Railways No. 21C114 "West Country" class locomotive "Budleigh Salterton"
23. Nameplate of a "Merchant Navy" class locomotive
24. Nameplate of a "West Country" class locomotive, No. 34012 "Launceston"
25. No. 34075, "Battle of Britain" Class locomotive, "264 Squadron" in British Railways livery
26. No. 35012, "Merchant Navy" Class locomotive, "United States Lines" in modified form in British Railways livery
27. No. 34014, "West Country" Class locomotive, "Budleigh Salterton" in British Railways livery in modified form
28. View of outside motion of a rebuilt "West Country" class locomotive
29. No. 34062, "Battle of Britain" Class locomotive "17 Squadron" in British Railways livery, in modified form
30. No. 35022, "West Country" Class locomotive "Exmoor" being rebuilt at Eastleigh on the 29th May 1959
31. No. 34041 "West Country" Class locomotive "Wilton" being repaired at Eastleigh on 29th May 1959
32. British Railways Pacific Class 7, 7000 "Britannia"
33. Photo of a cab of a Crewe-built "Britannia" Class 4-6-2 locomotive. Photo shows visibly the neat and tidy layout of fittings and unusual reversing gear
34. British Railways Crewe-built standard Class 6 MT locomotive No. 72009 "Clan Stewart", which entered traffic in April 1952
35. British Railways Class 8P locomotive, No. 71000 "Duke of Gloucester", which takes the honour of being Britain's last Pacific locomotive

Tables:
1. Compares cylinders, valve gear, coupled wheels, working pressure, tractive effort, heating surface, superheater surface, grate area and adhesive weight across 3 classes of locomotive: G.W.R No. 111; G.N.R No. 1470 and N.E.R No. 2400.
2. Loading dimensions of the Stanier Pacifics.
Cross references cylinders (4) bore, stroke, coupled wheels, bogie wheels, trailing wheels, coupled wheelbase, heating surface: firebox, tubes and flues, total; superheater, grate area, working pressure, adhesion weight, weight of engine in working order, weight of engine and tender and tractive effort for No. 6200 as built; Nos. 6203-6212; No. 6202; Streamlined series and Nos. 6220-6257
3. Principal dimensions of the leading Pacific classes cross references data on cylinders: number of, bore and stroke, coupled wheels, bogie wheels, trailing wheels, coupled wheelbase, heating surface: firebox, tubes and flues, total; superheater, grate area, working pressure, adhesion weight, weight of engine in working order, weight of engine and tender and tractive effort for a Gresley A4, Peppercorn A1, Stanier 6220-6257, "Merchant Navy", B.R. Class 7 and B.R. Class 8.
4. Pacific Locomotives in the 1948 Exchange Trials. Looks at Coal consumption ratio in lb (pounds) over work done in HP-Hour; and Water consumption ratio of water in lb (pounds) over work done in HP-hour for an E. R. Gresley A4; L.M.R. "Duchess"; S.R "Merchant Navy" and an S.R. "West Country" class
5. Performances of Pacific locomotives in regular service or on special trains: looks at highest speed reached, highest steaming rate (lb. hour) and highest D.B.H.P recorded for an E. R. Gresley A4, an L. M. R. "Duchess", an S. R. "Merchant Navy", an S. R. "West Country", a B. R. Class 7 and a B. R. Class 8 locomotive

Also: Table on Page 22. (Development of the Gresley Pacifics Chapter) Details timings for an L.N.E.R experimental run on a return journey from Newcastle to King's Cross on March 5th, 1935 of 4-6-2 engine No. 2750 "Papyrus", with a 6 coach load, 217 tons gross weight under:
Driver: W. Sparshatt
Fireman: R. Webster
Gives station name, distance in miles between stations, timing in minutes and seconds and speeds achieved in m.p.h; with notes.

 

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Titles on Nigel Gresley:

Evans, Martin; and Harris, K.N. (Foreword): 'Rob Roy:  How to build a simple 3.5 in gauge 0-6-0 tank locomotive based on the Dockyard Engines of the Old Caledonian Railway', published in 1979 in Great Britain in paperback, 112pp, ISBN 0852426933. Condition: Good++ clean & tidy condition, with some very light tanning to internal pages and a bit of dusty fading to the cover consistent with age & useage. Overall a nice clean and tidy copy. Price: £20.00, not including post and packing, which is Amazon's standard charge (currently £2.75 for UK buyers, more for overseas customers)
1979, Model & Allied Publications, pbk, revised edition
In stock, click to buy for £20.00, not including p&p
Evans, Martin. 'Rob Roy'.
1972, Model & Allied Publications
In stock, click to buy!

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About this book/synopsis: Based on the old Caledonian Railway dockyard tank locomotive, Rob Roy has been a popular choice of model by enthusiast since Martin Evans first presented it in the novices building competition at the Model Engineer Exhibition in 1962. This book describes blow by blow how to build it based on the original instructions from the magazine at the time, but supplemented by readers' advice and comments. The book has been arranged to deal with the various steps of construction chapter by chapter with half tone illustrations and reduced scale line drawings and b&w plates.

Roy Roy was a natural choice because there had been demand by model engineers for a mainline engine or a "Company" engine and for a locomotive with a larger boiler and more power all round so that the driver could keep up with the bigger and more powerful locomotives on the club tracks. Rob Roy meets these demands - it's a "Company" engine (Caledonian); it is simple to build and powerful enough to pull two or three passengers with ease and it's quite a close-to-scale model of the real dockyard locomotives. It has outside cylinders with valve chests inside the frames and these are operated by a version of the well-known Stephenson Link valve. The valve gear in this model is interesting in itself because it uses an expansion link very similar to that used by the old Great Western Railway (known as the "launch-type" link). The valve rods have been copied from a very unusual design used on the former North London Railway and the boiler is a simple round-top type with flue-tube superheaters and an outside crosshead feed pump fitted for maximum accessibility. There is a simple, but reliable mechanical lubricator.

Chapters:
Foreword; Introduction
1. Frames, Horns and Axleboxes
2. Wheels and Axles
3. The Cylinders
4. The Valve Gear
5. Assembling the Valve Gear
6. Boiler Feed Pump
7. Starting on the Boiler
8. Boiler Fittings, Grate and Ashpan
9. Platework and Final Details
10. Raising Steam and Driving
11. Painting and the End of the Story

Evans, Martin. 'Simple Model Locomotive Building...introducing LBSC's TICH: LBSC describes the construction of his famous TICH for 3.5 in gauge, published in 1977 in Great Britain by Model & Allied Publications (Argus Books), in paperback, 268pp, ISBN 0852424574. Condition: Good+ clean & tidy condition, well looked-after. Price:
1977, Model & Allied Publications (Argus Books) reprint of 1976 revised ed., pbk Evans, Martin. 'Simple Model Locomotive Buildiing...introducing LBSC's TICH.' Published by Model & Allied Publications, 1970 reprint,
1970, MAP, hbk
In stock, very good condition, click image above to buy for £40.00, not including post and packing, which is a further £3.25 for UK buyers, more for overseas customers. 1st class & international postage available

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About this book/synopsis: This book is based on LBSC's 3.5 inch gauge locomotive and serves as an introduction to model loco building for every enthusiast who's interested and perhaps who hopes to own a lathe at some point! It was born from the many requests from model engineers for a book that contained really complete instructions for building a live-steam coal-fired locomotive including detailed and fully-dimensional drawings that even the complete beginner could have a go at with every chance of success. In choosing L.B.S.C's little industrial tank engine for 3.5 in gauge, called 'Tich', the publishers made a sensible and logical choice of a model which can be built with the minimum of tools and equipment, also in a reasonable amount of time. This engine, it should be noted, can pull the builder with power to spare and at a very respectable speed. It was always L.B.S.C's wish to assist the beginner and show him or her how easy some of the difficult-looking jobs really are. So, the sentiment is buy the book and make a start!

Don't forget to visit Reeves for parts, tools and advice

Chapters:
Foreword; Introduction
1. Making a Start
2. Building the Running Gear
3. Coupling Rods & Feed Pump
4. Machining the Cylinders
5. Guide Bars & Crossheads
6. Making the Valve Gear
7. Steam Pipes & Lubricator
8. Starting on the Boiler
9. Fitting the Boiler Tubes
10. Staying the Boiler
11. Making the Smokebox
12. The Regulator and Superheater
13. Starting on the Boiler Fittings
14. Making the Grate & Ashpan
15. Platework, the Final Details
16. Firing and Driving the Engine
Index
The book contains copious technical details, photographs and diagrams to help the enthusiast starting out on this hobby

Evans, Martin. 'Simplex 0-6-0 Freelance Tank Locomotive for 5 in. Gauge: A Simple Powerful Engine That is Suitable for the Beginner Who Requires Ease of Construction', published in 1982 in Great Britain (reprint) by Model & Allied Publications in paperback, 80pp, ISBN 0852427964. Condition: very good with some slight marks from usage. Price: £65.00, not including post and packing, which is Amazon's standard charge (currently £2.75 for UK buyers, more for overseas customers)
1982, Model & Allied Publications, pbk
In stock, click to buy for £110, not including post and packing, which is £2.80 for UK buyers, more for overseas customers

Evans, Martin. 'Simplex 0-6-0 Freelance Tank Locomotive for 5 in. Gauge: A Simple Powerful Engine That is Suitable for the Beginner Who Requires Ease of Construction', published in 1977 by Model & Allied Publications, 80pp, ISBN 085244981. Sorry, sold out, but click image to access prebuilt search for this title on Amazon
1977, Model & Allied Publications, pbk
Sorry, sold out, but click image above to access a prebuilt search for this title on Amazon UK

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About the Book: Based on a series originated in Model Engineer, this is a complete handbook describing the construction and operation of a simple live steam 0-6-0 tank engine.The completed model can handle passengers. All stages of construction include working diagrams. This book is extremely scarce and can prove to be expensive to get hold off. It does appear on Ebay very occasionally

Chapters:
1. Introducing Simplex, Frames, Horns, Feed Pump
2. Axleboxes and Wheels, including sections on hard spots and How Much To Remove? (which looks at how much metal should be removed from the back of the wheel castings), Mounting the Wheels and Finishing Operations; and Shape of Treads.
3. Coupling Rods and Cylinder. Includes information on the boring bar
4. More About the Cylinders: Making the Crossheads
5. Connecting Rods, Motion Plates, Expansion Links
6. Completing the Valve Gear and Making The Cab Reversing Gear including combination levers, anchor links, the weighshaft
7. A New Type of Boiler, including a section on why it is easier to construct and gives info on the larger than usual firedoor. The chapter looks at the construction of the new boiler and how the plates are made. Simple Crownstays are described as well as the process of fitting the tubes
8. Staying the Boiler and Making The Hydraulic Test includes information on the types of stays, and Easyflo paste
9. Smokebox and Superheater: Regulator, Chimney and Dome includes information on steam and exhaust pipes, superheaters, the regulator, the Blowdown valve, the Saddle, the chimney and dome, grate and Ashpan and mounting the boiler.
10. Platework, Lubricator and Whistle

Photographs
Include a close-up picture of the wheels and the Walschaerts valve gear
Valve Gear, Motion and Crosshead

Working Drawings
[please note we do not (as yet) have these in stock]
When this book was published, Model & Allied Publications published full-size working drawings of Simplex which could be purchased singly or as a set of six sheets:
Sheet 1. General arrangement, details of frames, buffer beams, stretchers and main horns
Sheet 2. Feed pump, driving and coupled wheels, axles and axleboxes, coupling and connecting rods, cylinders and motion plates
Sheet 3. Crossheads, Walschaerts valve gear, cab reversing gear
Sheet 4. Full details of the boiler
Sheet 5. Details of superheater, regulator, grate, ashpan, chimney, dome and whistle. Arrangement of lubricator drive
Sheet 6. Details of running boards, cab, side tanks and bunker

1977, Model & Allied Publications, pbk

1982. Model & Allied Publications, pbk

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