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Titles to Look Out For:
[in alphabetical order, dated to earliest edition. Each listing includes later editions and printings]
1990. BR in the Eighties by David St John Thomas & Patrick Whitehouse
1963. Britain's Railway Liveries 1825-1948 by Ernest F. Carter
1992 and later eds. An Illustrated History of British Railways' Workshops by Edgar Larkin
1973. The LMS Duchesses edited by Douglas Doherty
1989. Locomotives of the Great Central Railway. Volume One. 1897-1914
1992. Locomotives of the Ministry of Defence by R. K. Hateley
1949. L.S.W.R. Locomotives: A Survey 1872-1923. Fully Illustrated
1981. Signalling Days: Final Reminiscences of a Great Western Railwayman
2002. The Sorrows of Quintinshill
1995 and later eds. Steam Sheds and Their Locomotives by Chris Gammell

Miscellaneous
Did you know that the rare and highly sought-after 2003 Ian Allan book The Railways of Great Britain. A Historical Atlas. [Volume 1 and 2 in Slipcase] was inspired by P.G. Wodehouses's book Sunset at Blandings Castle. Read more on our P.G. Wodehouse page

Key Information
Steam Locomotive Wheel Arrangements:

Pacifics had the 4-6-2 wheel arrangement
Atlantics had the 4-4-2 wheel arrangement
Baltics had the 4-6-4 wheel arrangement
Consolidations had the 2-8-0 wheel arrangement
Prairies had the 2-6-2 wheel arrangement
Mikados had the 2-8-2 wheel arrangement

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St. John Thomas, David; and Whitehouse, Patrck. 'BR in the Eighties', published by Guild Publishing, 192pp, hardback with dustjacket. Sorry, sold out, but click image to access a prebuilt search for this title on Amazon UK
1990, Guild Publishing
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  • BR [British Railways] in the Eighties [top]
    Written by David St. John Thomas & Patrick Whitehouse
    First published in 1990 in Great Britain by David & Charles in hardback with dustjacket, 192pp, ISBN 0715398547
    Reprinted in 1990 by Guild Publishing (book club publisher), in hardback, 192pp

Contents: The book records immense changes taking place on the railways in the 1980s and the authors have been helped in this endeavour by a team of distinguished contributors and photographers. There is a lot of nostalgia, but also a lot of reference material too. The fifteen chapters include a general portrait 'The Age of the Train', detailed investigations into the sectors (sectorisation being the means by which BR made itself more commercial) and surveys of aspects such as closures and openings (almost more of the latter than the former) the revolution in motive power, signalling, catering and the Channel Tunnel. The book also looks at the charter trains, whose world was precarious on BR rails in the 1980s. The colour and black & white photographs (there are a lot of photographs) have been chosen partly for their technical and reference importance, but also to build into a total evocation of the decade in which Pullmans made an unexpected comeback, many specialist freight movements expanded, provincial expresses began running from Britain's West to East Coast, and as the Channel Tunnel became a reality, disputes about an upgraded route to London were temporarily put out of the news by a dramatic accident at Clapham Junction

Chapters:
1. The Age of the Train
2. Memories of the 1980s
3. Regions, Sectors and PTEs
4. Expresses Ever Faster
5. Special and Charter Trains
6. Network SouthEast
7. Provincial
8. Catering
9. Freight, Ever More Specialist
10. Coaches
11. Closures and Openings
12. A Revolution in Motive Power
13. Signalling, Safety and Control
14. The Tenuous Link with Steam
15. The Channel Tunnel
Chronology; Index

Of particular interest:
P. 121. The Chronology of Railfreight in the 1980s, a month by month, year-by-year list of events
P. 128. BR Standard Coaches Running in the 1980s detailing Type, When Built, Length and Remarks
P. 137. BR in the 1980s: Dated line & station openings (some reopenings on old or new sites) and also closures, e.g. the old Birmingham Moor Street terminus was closed on 26th September 1987
P. 157. New classes of motive power built during the 1980s, giving (for the locomotives) type, numbering range, builder, date of build, power and how many. For the DMUs and EMUs, it gives type, numbering range, builder, date of build, number of cars in each set and total number of units built
P. 166. A Chronology of Principal Developments in Signalling during the decade
P. 169. Accidents of the 1980s (table of official statistics). Also a table of the Principal Accidents on BR caused by driver or signalling error
P. 188. Chronology of main events

  • Photographs (a selection of some of the more interesting ones):

    Miscellaneous

    Entrance banner at Glasgow Central proclaiming the age of the train slogan

    Diesel and Electric Locomotives:
    Class 03, 03073 at Duke Street in Birkenhead Docks, 23 August 1988
    Class 08, 08770 in the down sorting sidings at Tees Yard on 12 September 1980
    Class 20s, 20007 and 20053 struggle up the steep incline out of Coalbrookdale on 3 Nov 1988
    Class 26, 26005 at Eastfield Depot on 12 June 1988
    Class 31, 31246 heading an overhead mast foundations train between Haughley and Stowmarket on 18 June 1984
    Class 31, 31410 leaving Blea Moor Tunnel on 5 February 1983Class 40, 40092 at Newcastle Central Station, New Year's Eve 1981
    Class 31, 31468 and Class 47, 47010 receive attention in the maintenance area of Crewe Diesel depot on 22 June 1988
    Class 37s, 37077 British Steel Shelton and 37096 on the 10.50 Lackenby to Corby 'steel-liner' train at Cargo Fleet, Middlesbrough, 9 December 1986
    Class 37, No 37235 The Coal Merchants Association of Scotland, 11 June 1989 at the Coalville Depot
    Class 37, 37669 at Lostwithiel station with China Clay traffic on 6 May 1988
    Class 40, 40160 towing a failed Class 108 dmu near Seascale 15 June 1984
    Class 43, 43119 (HST, High Speed Train) emerging from Calton Hill Tunnel, 21 June 1987

    Class 45, 45110 near Penmaenmawr, August 1986
    Class 45, 45117 approaching Garsdale with a railtour on 19 February 1983
    Class 47, 47475 at King Edward Bridge Junction, Gateshead on 16 May 1989
    Class 47, 47567 Red Star leaving Carlisle with the Hadrian Special, June 1988
    Class 50, 50007, Sir Edward Elgar, near Pirbright 29 July 1989
    Class 50, 50021 at Newton Abbott, 10 March 1987
    Class 50 "Hoover" 50029 Renown approaching Exeter Central on 17 August 1989
    Class 55, 55015 Tulyar at York on 2 January 1982, the last Deltic to be switched off by BR
    Class 56, 56015 (Romanian-built) at Coalville on 11 June 1989
    Class 58s, 58016, 58017 and 58018 under construction in Doncaster works, 28 July 1984
    Class 59, 59001 at Bridgnorth on the SVR diesel weekend in May 1988
    Class 59, 59004 at West Ealing, 13 August 1988
    Class 60, 60005 and 60006 under construction inside the Procor Works at Horbury, 25 April 1989
    Class 73 Electro-Diesel No. 73120 leaves Gatwick on 22 September 1986
    Class 82 Mk4 DVT No. 82203 with Mk4 stock heading through Potters Bar on 4 November 1989
    Class 85, 85013, at Low Gill on 9th August 1983
    Class 86, 86244 The Royal British Legion on 16 August 1988 at Crewe
    Class 86, 86427 The Industrial Society, and 87005, City of London heading through Lune Gorge on 23 February 1988
    Class 87, 87028 Lord President at Carlisle, 27 August 1988
    Class 89, 89001 at King's Cross Station, London, 1988
    Class 90, No 90006 climbing Shap at Greenholme on 10 May 1989
    Class 91, No. 91008, pulling away from Wakefield Westgate, 25 April 1989

    Steam
    Maunsell N15 4-6-0 No. 777 Sir Lamiel pounding up to Harbury Tunnel, July 1986
    No. 4468, Mallard in York Station in steam on 9 July 1986
    No. 4498, Sir Nigel Gresley in York Station in a scene prior to the 1980s
    Black Five duo No 4767 George Stephenson and No. 5407 on the Settle & Carlisle viaduct at Smardale near Kirkby Stephen in April 1981
    Class 76s, 76031 and 76033 climbing to Woodhead Tunnel, on 7 September 1980
    Peppercorn K1 2-6-0 No. 2005 passing Boldon Colliery, 22 January 1983
    Jubilee Class 4-6-0 No. 5593 Kolhapure at Rotherham Masborough Station, 4 June 1988
    K1, No. 2005 on the shore of Loc Eil in 1988
    Vale of Rheidol, BR's last regular steam operation-No. 9 Prince of Wales rounding the curve below Nantyronen
    1600 Class 0-6-0PT No. 1638 arriving at Totnes BR station
    Double Fairlie locomotive Merddin Emrys at the new Ffestiniog and BR interchange station in June 1982
    Great Western locomotives No.s 7029 Clun Castle and 5051 Drysllwyn Castle at Tiverton Junction on 8 September 1985

    DMUs/EMUS
    Class 104. Birmingham RC&W Co. Class 104 unit No. 104325 in 'mexican bean' livery near Tyndrum, 29 September 1987
    Class 124 dmu four-car class near Clapham (not the one in London) on 22 May 1982
    Class 143. Alexander/Barclay Class 143 dmu No. 143022 crossing the High Level bridge into Gateshead on 7 November 1986
    Sprinter No. 150279 (150/2 series) in Nantgarw Gap on 31 March 1988
    Metro-Cammell sprinter unit No. 150284 heads south across the Forth Bridge, 29 August 1988
    4-EPB No. 5335 passes the new Eltham station under construction on 17 August 1984
    Class 155 unit, No. 155302 by Leyland on the 1 in 75 Ashley Hill bank, Bristol, July 1988
    Prototype three-car version of the class 210 demu set No. 210002 departing from West Ealing
    Class 303 emu No. 303046 leaving Glasgow Central, 11 June 1988
    25kV emu No. 310103 at Monument Lane depot, May 1989
    APT-P unit No. 370001 passing Lambrigg on 19 March 1986
    Class 312/1 emus 312793 and 312784 passing through Bethnal Green station on 10 Jan 1989
    Class 317/0 emu No. 317315 departing from St. Pancras on 26 September 1986
    Class 319, 319041 at Holborn Viaduct, on 18 August 1989
    Class 321 emu 321307 passing through Bethnal Green station on 10 January 1989
    Class 413/2-CAPS No.s 3206 and 3207 at Holborn Viaduct awaiting departure on 18 August 1989
    A class 442, five car unit, passing through Pirbright going to Waterloo on 20 February 1989
    Class 483, #1, refurbished 1938 ex-London Underground stock breaking the inaugural service banner on 13 July 1989
    Single-Car unit No. 55032 near Porth on 15 August 1985
    Two-car diesel Class 127 parcels unit No.s 55972 and 55982 at Stone Station, no date
    Metro-Cammell dmu No. 101339 leaving the Glasgow Eastfield fuelling point, 29 May 1982
    Leyland/BREL Class 141 dmus 55503/55523 approaching Heaton Lodge Jnctn, 21 Mar 1987
    Class 504 Nos 77168 and 65447 passing Queen's Road signalbox Manchester

    No.s 508136 and 507004 at Kirkdale in November 1988

    Coaches:
    MK1 gangwayed set of coaches coded NHA at Crewe September 1989
    Mk2a open second No E5259 as built at Derby in 1967
    Mk3a tourist open second No. M12004, carried on BT10 bogies
    Schematic diagram of the standard Mk3 open second as built with tables


British Rail Traction:


History of British Railways:


Diesels on BR:


EMUs on British Rails:
Carter, Ernest F. 'Britain's Railway Liveries 1825-1948', published in 1963 in Great Britain in hardback, with dustjacket, 350pp, no ISBN. Condition: Good++ condition, well looked-after with a touch of handling wear (rubbing) to the dustjacket edges. There's a tiny 0.5cm rip on the top edge of the back of the dustjacket). Price: £54.00, not including post and packing, which is Amazon's standard charge (currently £2.80 for UK customers, more for overseas buyers)
1963, Harold Starke Limited, hbk
In stock, click image above to buy for £54.00, not including post and packing, which is £2.80 for UK buyers

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About this book/synopsis: This book is the result of the author's passionate ambition to preserve a record of the linings, lettering, colours, crests, heraldic devices and identification of the railways of the United Kingdom from 1825 to 1948. Ernest F. Carter has, by this means, produced an exceptional and completely original work of reference which is both complete and unique. The book traces the history of the early companies, and their successive changes of livery are closely followed and recorded. Most precious of all, this book includes a paint colour-chart, which enables the author to key all colours mentioned in the text so that the reader can identify them and be sure that the colour is authentic and recognisable. In addition to this chart in which the colours have been matched and checked against those of actual rolling-stock, 'Britain's Railway Liveries' includes eight magnificent full colour plates and many line drawings, diagrams and black and white photographs.

Contents:
Preface; Introduction

Part I
Pre-Group Liveries, 1825-1922

Barry Railway
Brecon and Merthyr Railway
Caledonian Railway
Cambrian Railway
Furness Railway
Glasgow and South Western Railway
Great Central Railway
Great Eastern Railway
Great Northern Railway
Great North of Scotland Railway
Great Western Railway
Highland Railway
Hull and Barnsley Railway
Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway
London, Brighton and South Coast Railway
London, Chatham and Dover Railway
London and North Western Railway
London and South Western Railway
London, Tilbury and Southend Railway
Maryport and Carlisle Railway
Metropolitan District Railway
Metropolitan Railway
Other London Underground Railways
Midland Railway
Midland and Great Northern Joint Railway
North British Railway
North Eastern Railway
North London Railway
North Staffordshire Railway
Rhymney Railway
Somerset and Dorset Joint Railway
South Eastern Railway
South Eastern and Chatham Railway
Taff Vale Railway
Minor Railways and Previous Older Companies
Irish Railways
Pullman Cars

Part II
Group Liveries 1923-1948

Great Western Railway
London Midland and Scottish Railway
London and North Eastern Railway
Southern Railway
London Passenger Transport Board

Appendix A. Classified List of Pre-Group Locomotive Colour Plates
Appendix B. Historic British Locomotives and Coaches Preserved
Appendix C. Initials Borne by Pre-Group Rolling Stock and Wagon Sheets (circa 1896)
Appendix D. Linings and Diagrams

Contains also 8 full colour plates:
1. North Eastern Railway Locomotive, 1875
2. Great Eastern Railway Locomotive, 1873
3. London and North Western Railway Locomotive, 1861
4. Midland Locomotive, pre 1882
5. Midland and Great Northern Joint Railway Locomotive, circa 1891
6. North Staffordshire Railway Locomotive, 1884
7. Somerset and Dorset Joint Railway Locomotive, circa 1899
8. London and South Western Railway Locomotive, 1863
Paint Colour Chart (p.336)

And 8 Monochrome Plates
1. Caledonian locomotive No. 468, G.N.R. coach, 1901; N.B.R. locomotive No. 602; East Coast kitchen carriage; G.N.R. coal wagon, 1903
2. G.E.R. bogie compo, 1907; G.E.R. locomotive 1881-2; G.C.R. horse box; G.E.R. refrigerator van; G.N.R. Ivatt locomotive; G.E.R. van, 1888
3. L. and S.W.R. sleeping saloon; L & S.W.R. Inspector's saloon; L. & S.W.R bogie coach; S.E & C.R. locomotive; Dublin & Kingstown railway locomotive, 1851
4. Metropolitan locomotive; Colne Valley & Halstead railway locomotive; L.S.W.R tank locomotive; locomotive "SPEY", 1866
5. M.R. composite coach; G.C.R. composite coach; L.N.W.R coach; L.N.W.R locomotive, 1910; M.R. wagon
6. C.L.C. composite coach, 1904; G.W.R. composite clerestory coach
7. G.C.R. locomotive; S&D.J.R. coach; G.W.R. horse box; L.B. & S.C.R. locomotive; G.E.R. wagon, 1903
8. Old L.B. & S.C.R guards brake; old L.B & S.C.R. flat wagon; S.E. & C.R. Royal Saloon; Bodmin and Wadebridge Coach



Pre-Grouping Railway Companies


Other Ernest F. Carter Books
Larkin, Edgar. 'An Illustrated History of British Railways' Workshops: Locomotive, Carriage and Wagon Building and Maintenance, from 1825 to the Present Day', published in 2007 (reprint), by OPC in hardback, 184pp, ISBN 0860935035. Very good condition, although book is a customer return after suffering minor damage in the post, which is that the front lower opening corner of the cover (book and dustjacket) was damaged in postal machinery (about a finger tips worth of damage). The back cover lower corner is similarly very slightly crumpled  Price: £6.99, not including p&p, which is Amazon's standard charge (currently £2.80 for UK buyers, more for overseas customers)
2007, OPC, hbk
In stock, £6.99, not including post and packing (which is Amazon UK's standard charge of £2.80. Overseas customers will need to contact us to arrange a sale)

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Contents: Within British Railways, a main works has always been classified as one which is equipped to build and/or undertake heavy classified repairs of locomotives or rolling stock. This comprehensive book provides a broad pictorial record of the railway workshops that were inherited by British Railways at Nationalisation in 1948.

The book gives an outline description of how the workshops established by the various railway companies developed, afterwards giving a brief history of each works. The author himself was involved at the top levels with the reorganisation and inevitable rationalisation of the various works, which has allowed him to draw upon personal intimate knowledge of the subject as well as documentation specially preparted to help BR plan for its workshop requirements

Plans of all the main locomotive works are included (never before published), offering a unique record of the workss as they were at the time of Nationalisation. For railway modellers wishing to recreate any of the works, these plans will be invaluable. The book gives details and illustrations of typical or well-known products for the works, including statistical data.

Apart from the locomotives and rolling stock, the human aspect of the works supplying and maintaining railway equipment is covered, for example, the author talks about how he established the LMS's apprentice training scheme and how it was run.

About the Author: Born in 1900, Edgar Larkin served a long and distinguised career in the railways, working in the workshops for most of the 52 years service, which spanned 1914-1966. He was chairman of various policy committees that dealt with the organisation of the railways' main works and in the natural turn of events was appointed to the post of Deputy General Manager of British Railway's Workshop Division, looking after 60,000 staff. This followed on from an appointment with the BTC as First Director of Work Study, where he reported to the Chairman Lord Robertson

Chapters:
Foreword by F. G. Clements
Acknowledgements
Preface
1. The Beginning of Railways
2. Locomotives and Power Units: Locomotives Works Organisation Report, December 1948.
Then Follow The British Railway Locomotive Works (from pages 26-100), in alphabetical order starting with the enormous Ashford Locomotive Works
Bow, Brighton, Cowlairs, Crewe, Darlington, Derby, Doncaster, Eastleigh, Gorton (accidentally labelled Doncaster at the top of page 73), Horwich, Inverurie, Kilmarnock, St. Rollox, Stratford, Swindon, Wolverhampton
3. Carriage Stock: Development of the Early Passenger Carriages
Bodies, Bogies, Axle-Boxes and Wheel Bearings, Brakes, Inter-Coach Drawgear, Carriage Heating, Lighting, Passenger Environment, Multiple Unit Stock, Special Purpose Carriages, List of Carriage Works (Caerphilly, Cowlairs, Derby, Doncaster, Eastleigh, Gorton, Inverurie, Lancing, St. Rollox, Stratford, Swindon, Walkergate, Wolverton, York)
4. Freight Stock
Early Developments; Development of Freight Rolling Stock; Design Improvements to Freight Vehicles; Wagon Works (Ashford, Barassie, Bromsgrove, Cowlairs, Derby (Litchurch Lane), Doncaster, Earlestown, Eastleigh, Faverdale, Gorton, Horwich, Inverurie, Shildon, Swindon, Temple Mills, Walkergate, York)
5. BR Works Training Schools
6. Wartime Products in the Railway Workshops, e.g. Matilda Tank; 17-pounder anti-tank carriage and gun
7. Some Notable Occasions
8. Universal Machine Tools in Carriage and Wagon Works
Appendix 1: Order in which BR's Main Works were built
Appendix 2: Railway companies amalgamated to form the four main-line companies in 1923
Appendix 3: British Railways Locomotives at 31st December 1948
Appendix 4: British Railways Coaching Traffic Vehicles at 31st December 1948
Appendix 5: British Railways Freight Traffic Vehicles at 31st December 1948
Appendix 6: British Railways Service Vehicles at 31st December 1948
Appendix 7: Summary of BR Traction and Rolling Stock at 31st December 1988 and comparison with figures from BR at the time of Nationalisation
Bibliography



Other books of potential interest:

Dohery, Douglas (Ed.), 'The LMS Duchesses' published in Great Britain in 1973 in hardback by Model & Allied Publications, 89pp, ISBN 085242325X. Sorry, sold out, but click image to access a prebuilt search for this title on Amazon UK
1973, Model & Allied Publications, hbk
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  • The LMS Duchesses [top]
    Edited by Douglas Doherty
    First published in 1973 in Great Britain by Model and Allied Publications in hardback with dustjacket, 89pp, ISBN 085242325X
    [LMS: London, Midland & Scottish Railway Region]
    Original UK retail price when first sold: £2.50 net (in UK only)

Contents/Synopsis: Douglas Doherty's Introduction says it all about what this book is designed to do - to bring pleasure to the reader by seeking to re-create certain of the life and times of these locomotives via words drawings and pictures. The four contributors to the book are admirably suited to this task. E. A. Langridge talks about the LMS Duchesses -their design and construction. Langridge was one of Drummond's last apprentices at Eastleigh. John Powell started his railway career with a mechanical apprenticeship at Derby Works. He has contributed 'The LMS Duchesses - a performance evaluation' to this book. The next contributor, Peter Johnson has written 'The LMS Duchesses - a driver reminisces' and W.A. Tuplin has written 'The LMS Duchesses - a critical appreciation.'
For the reader that likes lots of technical data and performance indicators, the section by John Powell on 'The LMS Duchesses - a performance evaluation' offers a world of interest- it includes gradient profiles for Carnforth - Shap Summit; Gretna - Beattock Summit; Motherwell - Beattock Summit; and Carlisle - Shap Summit along with graphs of engine performance (speed in m.p.h and drawbar horsepower plotted against the stages of the gradient profile). Even more fascinatingly it has a scale drawing on page 66 - 67 (Fig. 7) showing how the L.M.S Duchesses might have evolved (based on the theory that a mechanical stoker would have helped the engine reach its full potential); and also based on the improvement of various mechanical defects that afflicted (or afflict) the Duchesses such as blocked sanding gear, etc.

Chapters:
Introduction by Douglas Doherty
The LMS Duchesses - their design and construction by E. A. Langridge
The LMS Duchesses - a performance evaluation by John Powell
The LMS Duchesses - a driver reminisces by Peter Johnson
The LMS Duchesses - a critical appreciation by W. A. Tuplin

Locomotives Illustrated:
Duchess of Atholl
City of Birmingham
City of Bradford
Duchess of Buchleuch
City of Carlisle
Coronation
City of Coventy
Duchess of Devonshire
City of Glasgow
City of Hereford
Lady Patricia
City of Lancaster
City of Hereford
Lady Patricia
City of Lancaster
City of Leicester
City of Lichfield
City of Liverpool
City of London
City of Manchester
Duchess of Montrose
No. 6202 Turbomotive
City of Nottingham
Princess Alice
Princess Anne
Princess Beatrice
Princess Elizabeth
Princess Louise
Queen Elizabeth
Queen Mary
Duchess of Rutland
Ctiy of Salford
City of Sheffield
Sir William A. Stanier
City of St. Albans
City of Stoke-on-Trent
Duchess of Sutherland

Illustrations Included:
Includes scale diagrams:

Page 2. 'Four transverse views of a "Duchess" in streamline cladding. There is a fold-out page on p.18 for cross sectional side elevation and plan of a duchess. The fold-out page on page 18 is of D. Drummond's 443 4-6-0 with all its major measurements
Page 4 gives sideways views of the Princess Royal Class, the 6202 locomotive and the Princess Coronation class; each of the three diagrams has the main measurements recorded

Page 19 gives further detailed scale diagram information and measurements on Duchessses
Page 21 shows a detailed drawing of a double chimney and blastpipe

Tables Included:
From section 'LMS Duchesses -their design and construction'
Page 33. Principal dimensions and weights of the LMS Locomotives 6220-57. A table follows underneath listing out 6220 - 6257 with name & builddate, original condition (e.g. streamlined?) and livery; also date of withdrawal
From section 'The LMS Duchesses - a performance evaluation '
Page 36. Table 1. Table of timings on the Up 'Ulster Express': 6.55 am Heysham - Euston (1954) (XL Limit Timings), using Locomotive Cl.8P 4-6-2 No 4624 with 10 coaches. Give distance in miles against schedule in minutes, actual time taken in minutes and seconds, speed, boiler pressure, regulator position and Cut Off
Page 42. Table 2: Table of timings on the Down 'Coronation Scott' trial run, 29th June 1937 using locomotive Cl. 7P 4-6-2 No. 6220 Coronation with 8 coaches giving distance in miles, schedule in minutes, actual time in minutes and seconds and speeds in mph
Page 42. Table 3: Table of timings on the Down 'Coronation Scott,' trial run, 29th June 1937, with detailed speeds on the section of Whitmore - Crewe. Gives time for the half mile and average speed figures only
Page 43. Table 4. Table of timings on the Up 'Coronation Scott' trial run, 29th June 1937 with locomotive CL. 7P 4-6-2 No. 6220 Coronation with 8 coaches. Gives distance in miles, schedule in minutes, actual schedule achieved in minutes and seconds and speeds (m.p.h)
Page 44. Table 5. Table of timings on the Down 'Coronation Scott' journey taken at 1.30 pm on the Euston to Glasgow run, with locomotive Cl.7P 4-6-2 No. 6220 Coronation with a load of 9 coaches
Page 48. Table 6. Dynanometer Car Tests: Crewe-Glasgow with locomotive Cl.7P 4-6-2 No. 6234 Duchess of Abercorn with a load of 20 coaches. Date 12th February 1939 with single and double blastpipe. Driver G. Garrett on the Crewe to Carlisle stretch with Fireman S. Farringdon. On the Carlisle to Glasgow stretch, driver J. Marshall and Fireman S. Farringdon were in charge
Page 49. Table 7. Dynanometer Car Tests: Glasgow-Crewe with locomotive Cl.7P 4-6-2 No. 6234 Duchess of Abercorn with a load of 20 coaches. Date 12th February 1939 with single and double blastpipe. Driver N. McLean on the Glasgow to Carlisle stretch with Fireman A. Smith. On the Carlisle to Crewe stretch, driver G. Garrett and Fireman S. Farringdon were in charge
Page 53. Table 8. Table of timings on the Euston - Glasgow run in 1942 at 10 a.m from Euston, with locomotive Cl. 7P 4-6-2 No. 6221 Queen Elizabeth with a load of 16 coaches. Gives distance in miles, stages, schedule in minutes, actual schedule achieved and speeds reached
Page 54. Table 9. Table of speed (actual and calculated based on 40,000 lb/hr) on the Euston-Glasgow Central run (1944) starting at 10.5 a.m. with locomotive Cl.7P 4-6-2 No. 6244 King George VI. The specific bit of the journey measured was from Sedgewick I.B signal, then to Oxenholme and through 4 mile posts with the data stopping at Grayrigg
Page 56. Table 10. Locomotive Test Run: Carlisle - Skipton with locomotive Cl.8P 4-6-2 No. 46225 Duchess of Gloucester with a load of 442 tons tare including dyanometer car and mobile test units working, equivalent load 900 tons approx. Timings, distance and speeds reached are recorded on the journey between Cumwhinton and Kirkby Stephen Mallerstang with constant steam rate of 40,000 lb/hr
Page 58. Table 11. Table of timings on the Down 'Midday Scot' Euston - Glasgow run, starting at 1.15pm from Euston with locomotive Class 8P 4-6-2 No. 46255 City of Hereford with a load of 16 coaches to Carlisle and then 14 coaches from there forward. Distance in miles is recorded against stage of the journey, schedule in minutes, actual shedule achieved in minutes and seconds, speed reached (m.p.h), boiler pressure, regulator position and Cutoff
Page 62. Table 12. Table of timings on the Up 'Midday Scot' Glasgow - Euston starting at 1.30p.m. from Glasgow with locomotive Class 8P 4-6-2 No. 46233 Duchesses of Sutherland with a load of 14 coaches. Driver: Latham. Fireman: A. Clarke (Crewe N.) Distance in miles recorded against schedule in minutes and actual schedule achieved together with speeds in m.p.h for the stages of the journey from Carstairs to Lancaster
Page 63. Table 13. Table of timings on the Down sleeping car express from Euston - Glasgow with locomotive Class 8P 4-6-2 No. 46249 City of Bradford with a load of 14 coaches (driver not stated)
Page 64. Table 14. Table of timings on the 7.55 a.m. Euston - Liverpool/Manchester run with locomotive Class 8P 4-6-2 No. 46229 Duchess of Hamilton with a load of 16 coaches. Driver: Aitchison; and Fireman Corfield (Edge Hill). Distance in miles recorded against schedule in minutes and actual schedule achieved together with speeds in m.p.h for the stages of the journey from Watford Junction to Crewe
Page 65. Table 15. Table of timings on the Down 'Midday Scott' Euston - Glasgow run, with locomotive Class 8P 4-6-2 No. 46224 Princess Alexandra with a load of 16 coaches. Driver H. Nicklin and Fireman Roberts (Crewe North). Distance in miles recorded against schedule in minutes and actual schedule achieved together with speeds in m.p.h for the stages of the journey from London Euston to Crewe
Page 69. Table 16. Table of timings on the down run from Euston - Crewe with locomotive 8P 4-6-2 'Duchess' with mechanical stoker and load of 15 coaches (theoretical table of results extrapolated from data known by the author)
Page 71. Diagram giving the details of the make-up of the 'Coronation Scot' train showing seating arrangements and weights



Other LMS Books:


LMS Steam:


Books by Douglas Doherty:


Eastleigh Steam:
Johnson, E. M. 'Locomotives of the Great Central Railway. Volume One. 1897-1914', published in 1989 by Irwell Press in hardback with dustjacket, 138pp, ISBN 1871608058. Sorry, sold out, but click image to access prebuilt search for this title on Amazon UK
1989, Irwell Press, hbk
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About the book: In 1897, a previously cross-country provincial line, namely the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire railway, adopted the name 'Great Central Railway'.

Its chairman, Sir Edward Watkin, a dynamic and mercurial leader, focused the MS&L's thoughts and energies on reaching London, undertaking an ambitious and expensive line from Annesley, south of Sheffield, to Marylebone in London. You might have thought that this was ambition enough, but Watkin had a much grander vision than that - he had the idea for a Channel Tunnel when such ideas were thought to be the preserve of lunatics.

The London extension gave the GCR its own independent route into London for the first time, but it's important to note that the company had been running trains into London since the 1850s in conjunction with the Great Northern Railway, leaving rival LNWR out in the cold.

From double-framed Single, 2-4-0 and 4-4-0 types of steam locomotive under Charles Sacre, the Manchester, Sheffield & Lincolnshire Railway and Great Central had built a series of single-framed 4-4-0s which became the London expresses, providing motive power as far as Grantham.

One year after the London extension had opened (1900), the board of the Great Central Railway appointed a new Locomotive Engineer, J. G. Robinson, who had worked with Churchward on the Great Western under Armstrong and Dean and at the time of his appointment was working in a similar role in Ireland on the Waterford and Limerick railway. Robinson because of this background and experience was therefore very much viewed as a rising star in locomotive engineering.

His immediate task was to get the locomotive fleet of the Great Central up to scratch, since the Manchester base at Gorton was full of worn out locomotives dating back to the time of Sacre; locomotives which were causing congestion in the railway's operations, which at the time had also been reduced to borrowing motive power from sympathetic companies. Robinson decided to equip the Great Central with a fleet of powerful and highly capable engines, building on existing designs and his own experience.

Using a selection of superb photographs, mostly from the collection of G. H. Platt, we see Great Central locomotives at the zenith of the British railway system when the companies were unchallenged as prime movers of passengers and freight. Including drawings and archival material, this work endeavours to present a balanced and objective view of the GCR locomotive fleet and in particular J. G. Robinson's contribution to the history of the British steam locomotive.

Comments: The book is packed full of facts and photographs: items of historical interest such as the tenders to provide new boilers for the GCR fleet born out of Robinson's recommendations, Harry Pollitt's statement showing details of engines to be constructed (from 5th September 1899), and for each class of locomotives pictures of original documents showing cylinder, boiler, tubes, superheater, firebox shell, copper firebox, wheels, journals, valves and cylinder lubricator dimensions and key information, e.g. working pressure for the boilers and length of grate for the copper firebox. Each class has a chapter dedicated to it, with a brief description, a good selection of photographs and main locomotive dimensions.

The chapter on Great Central Railway Locomotive Classifications is very useful and comprehensive - it gives data on each class, looking at wheel arrangement, year first built and a brief description.

Chapters:
Introduction
Locomotives of the GCR
GCR locomotive classification
Locomotive Engineers of the MS&L & GC Companies

The Locomotives:
Class 5 0-6-0 Saddle Tank
0-6-2 Tanks Built for the MS&L & GC Railways
Class 9G 2-4-2 Tank
Class 11 4-4-0
Class 2 & 2A 4-4-0
Class 11A 4-4-0
Class 13 4-4-2
Class 15 2-6-0 'Mogul'
J. G. Robinson 'A Thumbnail Sketch'
Class 9H & 9J 0-6-0
Class 9M 0-6-0 Goods Engine
Class 11B/11C/11D 4-4-0
Class 8 4-6-0 Fish Engine
Class 8A 0-8-0 'The Tinies'
Class 9K & 9L 4-4-2 Tanks
Class 8B & 8C Simple Atlantics
Class 8C 4-6-0
Classes 8D & 8E Compound Atlantics
Class 8F 4-6-0 'Immingham'
Class 5A 0-6-0 Tank
Class 8G 4-6-0
Class 8H 0-8-4 Tank 'Wath Banker'
Class 8J 4-4-2 3-Cylinder Rebuilds
Class 9N 4-6-2 Tank
Class 4 0-6-0 Saddle Tank
Class 8K 2-8-0
Class 1 4-6-0 Sir Sam Fay
Class 1A 4-6-0 'Glenalmond'

Appendices
Express working on the MS&L-Manchester-Kings Cross
Tools Carried by GC Atlantics
Locomotive Drawings
Acknowledgements



Books on the Great Central Railway


Steam in North West England
Hateley, R. K. 'Locomotives of the Ministry of Defence', written by R. K. Hateley. First published in 1993 in Great Britain by the Industrial Railway Society, 176pp, ISBN 0901096717. Sorry, sold out, but click image to access prebuilt search for this item on Amazon UK
1993, Industrial Railway Society, pbk
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About this book: This book documents the known history of most of the locomotives operated by the War Department, Air Ministry, and Ministry of Defence from 1952 to date. The terms of reference are somewhat arbitrary and so should be explained. Army railways and locomotives in Britain were in 1942 put under the control of No. 1 Railway Detachment (Home), Royal Engineers. From 1945, the name was changed to 1 Railway Group, Royal Engineers, and in 1963 it became 1 Transportation Group, Royal Corps of Transport. In 1952 the War Department had disposed of many of the large fleet of locomotives that it had operated during and after World War 2 and so the remaining locomotives were renumbered into a new series. This is the starting point for the records of War Department locomotives within this volume. Several volumes have been published giving comprehensive details of the earlier fleets and are listed in the bibliography.

From April 1st 1964, the War Department became the Army Department of the Ministry of Defence, which also included the Navy Department (previously Admiralty) and Air Force Department (previously Air Ministry). Increasingly from this time, the Army Department supplied locomotives to cover shortages in stock at various Navy and Air Force locations, normally using their own locomotives. By 1989, the locomotives and railways at remaining Air Force locations had been fully integrated into the Army Railway Organisation. From 1968, the Army Department commenced a systematic renumbering of their locomotives and so the stock from this date has been listed again in the new series (still current in 1992)

Before 1964, the locomotives and railways at Royal Air Force sites were administered by the Air Ministry Works Department and locomotives of both standard and narrow gauge were listed in a common series. For completeness, all known locomotives in this series have been listed, although many of the steam locomotives had been disposed of before the inception of the Air Force Department. Since then, most of the locations have closed or ceased to use rail traffic and nearly all the diesel locomotives have been disposed of. None had been renumbered from the Air Ministry Works lists into the Army Railway Organisation series. However, those narrow gauge locos delivered new to the Air Force Department at Chilmark in 1987 / 1988 were allocated numbers in the Army series. At this time the seven narrow gauge locomotives at Chilmark, which were to be retained, were also allocated numbers in the Army series.

After 1961, the smaller Royal Ordnance Factories had their locomotives taken over the by Army Department and numbered in the 1952 WD series, but very few of them actually remained in service with the Army. Several main Royal Ordnance Factories stayed outside of the scheme, since being sold to private industry. Their locomotives have NOT been included in this book, but may be found listed in the relevant County Handbooks. This largely applies also to locos used at Navy Department dockyards and armament depots. The reader should bear in mind that there was no national system of numbering used for these locos - they carried 'Yard Numbers' at each location and there were few transers between sites which renders it unnecessary to set about duplicating in this volume information already carried in the County Handbooks

Contents:
Bibliography; Acknowledgements
Establishments Using Locomotives - explanations of abbreviations
Army Department (War Department until 01/04/1964) - location abbreviations
Royal Ordnance Factories - location abbreviations
Navy Department (Admiralty until 01/04/1964)
Abbreviations Used - Locomotives Details (e.g. ST = Saddle Tank; DH = Diesel Engine, Hydraulic Transmission)
1. Steam Locomotives
- 1951 Series

010 - 015 Miscellaneous Locos
040 - 044 'ROD' 2-8-0 OC
100 - 203 'Austerity' 0-6-0ST IC
300 - 311 'USA.TC' 0-6-0T OC
400 - 401 'WD' 2-8-0 OC
500 - 514 'Stanier 8F' 2-8-0 OC
600 - 601 'WD' 2-10-0 OC
700 'USA.TC' 2-8-0 OC
Locomotives Not Included in the Numbering Scheme
-1968 Series
90-98. 'Austerity' 0-6-0ST IC

2. Diesel Locomotives - 1951 Series
800-809 Ruston & Hornsby 4wDM Type 48DS
810-815 Miscellaneous Internal Combustion Locos
81X Series Duplicate List
820-845 WD 'Standard' 153HP 0-4-0DM
846 Drewry 150HP 0-4-0DM, ex LMSR
847-851 Hunslet 150HP 0-4-0DM
852-854 Fowler 150HP 0-4-0DM
855-857 Hunslet 204HP 0-6-0DM cut down for tunnel work
858-869. 'Standard' 153HP 0-4-0DM, ex ROF etc.
870-883 (First Series). LMS Design 350HP 0-6-0DE
884-1000 Miscellaneous Diesel Locos
870-873 (Second Series) Andrew Barclay 400HP 0-6-0DH
890 (Second Series) Sentinel 620HP 0-8-0DH
891-896 Andrew Barclay 621HP 0-8-0DH
8200-8213 North British 275HP 0-4-0DH
8214-8231 Ruston & Hornsby 275HP Type LSSH 0-6-0DH
8300-8317 John Fowler 150HP 0-4-0DM, ex ROF
8323-8327 Miscellaneous Diesel Locos
83XX Series Duplicate List
Locomotives not included in numbering scheme

3. Diesel Locomotives - 1968 Series
Note on Army Locomotive Classification Scheme
100-102 Class A1 Ruston & Hornsby 4wDM Type 48DS
110 Class A2EQ Ruston & Hornsby 4wDM Type 48DSG
111 Class A4EQ John Fowler 0-4-0DM 60HP
112-113 Class A5SA Ruston & Hornsby 4wDM Type 88DS
114 Class A6SA Hibberd "Planet" 4wDM
120 Class A7 Barclay 0-4-0DM 102HP
121-127 Class A7 'Standard' 0-4-0DM 153HP
200-202 Class B1 'Standard' 0-4-0DM 153HP
210-213 Class B2 'Standard' 0-4-0DM 153HP
220-237 Class B3 'Standard' 0-4-0DM 153HP (All rebuilt to Class B11, 0-4-0DM, 193HP)
240 Class B4 Drewry 0-4-0DM 150hp ex-LMSR
241 Class B4 'Standard' 0-4-0DM, 153HP
242-243 Class B7 John Fowler 0-4-0DM 150HP
244-245 Class B8EQ Thomas Hill 0-4-0DH rebuilds
246 Class B9EQ Hunslet 0-6-0DM 150HP
247-250 (Class as noted) 'Standard' 0-4-0DM
251-252 Unclassified Ruston & Hornsby 0-4-0DM Type 165DS
242/244 (Duplicate Series) Rolls-Royce 4wDH 255HP
252-269 Class C7 Thomas Hill "Vanguard" 4wDH 300HP
270-278 Thomas Hill 'Steelman Royale' 4wDH 335HP
400-413 Classes C1/C2SA North British 0-4-0DH 275HP
420-436 Class C3SA Ruston & Hornsby 0-6-DH 275HP Type LSSH
440 Class C4SA Ruston & Hornsby 0-6-0DH 275HP Type LSSH
450-453 Class C5
601 Class D1 LMSR Design 0-6-0DE 350HP
610 Class D2 Sentinel 0-6-0DH 620HP
620-625 Class D3SA Andrew Barclay 0-8-0DH 621HP
626-631 Andrew Barclay 0-6-0DH 600HP
870-873 Andrew Barclay 0-6-0DH 310HP
874-878 Hunslet 0-4-0DH, 300HP
German Built Baor Locomotives
0-4-0DH, Deutz, 110HP, Type A4M220
0-4-0DH 200HP, ex-Wehrmacht type WR200B
0-4-0DH 225HP
0-4-0DH Deutz 107HP Type A6M517
0-4-0DH Deutz 225HP Type T4M625
0-4-0DH OK 125HP Type MV69
0-6-0DH, Deutz 400HP Type V6M435
0-8-0DH, MAK 600HP Type 600D
Bogie Railcar 360HP and trailer

4. Railcars and Trailers
Miscellaneous 2w-2PMR
First Series 9xx 2w-2PMR (except where detailed)
Second Series 90xx 2w-2PMR Wickham
9104 (Second Series) 2w-2DMR Wickham
9100 - 9108 4wDMR Drewry Car Co.
9109 - 9110 2w-2PMR Wickham
9111 4wPMR Drewry Car Co
9112-9113 4wPMR Baguley
9114-9115 4wPMR Drewry Car Co
9114-9116 (Second Series) 4wDMR Clayton Equipment (Fire Tenders)
9117-9150 Baguley-Drewry
Wickham Crane Trolley 4wDM
Trailer series 92xx
Miscellaneous 2w-2PMR Wickham
British Army of the Rhine

5. Narrow Gauge Locomotives
1951 Numbering - LOD 758xxx series
1968 Series Numbering

6. Rail Target Trollies
4wREt (3rd & 4th rail) Wickham
2w-2PM Target Trollies

7. Air Ministry Works Dept Locomotives

8. Locomotive Index
Andrew Barclay, Son & Co. Ltd, Kilmarnock
-'Austerity' Type 0-6-0ST IC
-'WD Standard' 153HP 0-4-0DM
-594HP 0-8-0DH; 310HP 0-6-0DH; 600HP 0-6-0DH; 111HP 4wDH 2ft gauge
Avonside Engine Co. Ltd, Bristol
Alco, American Locomotive Company, Schenectady, NY, USA
- USATC S160 Type 2-8-0 oc
Sir W. G. Armstrong, Whitworth & Co. (Engineers) Ltd, Newcastle-upon-Tyne
-LMS 7059 series, 350HP 0-6-0DE
-4wDH 2ft gauge, 60HP
-4wBE 2ft gauge, 48HP
-4wDMR, 68HP
E. E. Baguley Ltd, Burton-on-Trent
Clayton Equipment Co. Ltd, Hatton, Derbyshire
Crewe Locomotive Works, LMSR
Davenport Locomotive Works, Davenport, IOWA USA
Drewry Car Co. Ltd, London
-WD Standard Type 153HP 0-4-0DM
Drewry Car Co. Ltd / E. E. Baguley Ltd, Burton-on-Trent
Derby Works, LMSR
Deutz, Motorenfabrik, Deutz AG, Koln, Germany
Dodman, Alfred Dodman & Co., King's Lynn
English Electric Co. Ltd., Dick, Kerr Works, Preston
F. C. Hibberd & Co. Ltd., London
Greenwood & Batley, Leeds
Gorton Works, GCR, Manchester
Hudswell Clarke & Co. Ltd, Leeds
-'Austerity' Type 0-6-0ST IC
Hunslet Engine Co. Ltd, Leeds
-'ROD' Type 4-6-0T OC 600mm gague
-4wDM 2ft gauge 20HP (*25HP)
-'Austerity Type' 0-6-0ST IC
-4wDH 2ft gauge, 28HP
R & W Hawthorn, Leslie & Co. Ltd., Newcastle-upon-Tyne
John Fowler & Co. (Leeds) Ltd., Leeds
Arn Jung Lokomotivfabrik GmbH, Jungenthal, Germany
Kerr, Stuart & Co. Ltd, Stoke-on-Trent
Maschinenbau & Bahnbedarf AG, Berlin, Germany
Motor Rail Ltd, Bedford
Manning Wardle & Co. Ltd., Leeds
North British Locomotive Co. Ltd., Glasgow
-'ROD' Type 2-8-0 OC (Built Hyde Park Works)
-'LMS 8F' Type 2-8-0 OC (Built Hyde Park Works)
-'WD' Type 2-8-0 OC (Built Queens Park Works)
-'WD' Type 2-10-0 OC (Built Hyde Park Works)
-275HP 0-4-0DH (Build Queens Park Works)
Orenstein & Koppel AG, Berlin, Germany
Peckett & Sons Ltd, Bristol
Ruston & Hornsby Ltd, Lincoln
-4wDM 2ft gauge
-44/48HP* and '48DS' Class 4wDM
-80/88HP and '88DS'* Class 4wDM
-'165DS' Class 0-4-0DM
-'LSSH' Class 0-6-0DH 275HP
Rolls-Royce Ltd, Shrewsbury
Robert Stephenson & Hawthorns Ltd, Forth Bank Works, Newcastle-upon-Tyne
-Air Ministry 0-4-0DM, 150HP
-'Austerity' Type 0-6-0ST IC
R & W Hawthorn & Co. Newcastle-upon-Tyne
Schwartzkopff - Berliner Maschinenbau AG, vormals L. Schwartzkopff
Swindon Works, Great Western Railway
-'Dean Goods' 0-6-0 IC
Thomas Hill (Rotherham) Ltd, Kilnhurst
-300HP 'Vanguard' 4wDH
-335HP 'Steelman Royale' 4wDH
Vulcan Foundry Ltd, Newton-le-Willows Lancs
-'LMS 8F' Type 2-8-0 OC
-'WD Standard' Type 153HP 0-4-0DM
-'WD' Type 2-8-0 OC
-'Austerity' Type 0-6-0ST IC
Vulcan Iron Works, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, USA
-'USA TC' Type 0-6-0T OC
W. G. Bagnall Ltd., Stafford
-'Austerity' Type 0-6-0ST IC
-Rebuilt Locomotives
Whitcombe - The Whitcombe Locomotive Company, Rochelle, Illinois, USA
D. Wickham & Co. Ltd., Ware, Hertfordshire
Wingrove & Rogers Ltd., Kirkby, Liverpool

Locomotive Dimensions - split into Standard Designs and Other Locomotives

9. Illustrations: Plates (all in b&w):
Steam:
1. WD 123 (HE 2897/1943) - an example of the standard Austerity 0-6-0ST at Bicester Depot on 13-Aug-61. Photograph by John Hill
2. WD 198 (HE 3798/1953) - stored in reserve stock at Long Marston, 29-Jul-64. Photograph by A. R. Etherington
3. Army 98 (HE 3798/1953), the loco of the previous illustration [2] returned to traffic for special duties, taken at Long Marston, 9-Jul-77
4. WD 400 (NBQ 25205/1943), one of the few Austerity 2-8-0's to remain in WD stock, shown here at the end of its career, at Longmoor, 3-Jun-67. Photograph by R. K. Hateley
5. WD 501 (NBH 24620/1940) - a Stanier design 2-8-0 in steam at Longmoor, 1955. Photograph by G. Alliez
6. WD 600 Gordon (NBH 25437/1943) - the Austerity 2-10-0 locos were better thought of than the 2-8-0 version. Photographed at Longmoor, 1955 by G. Alliez
Diesels:
7. WD 814 (RH 218046/1942), the army used more of these Ruston 48DS locos than the larger 88DS. Seen outside Bicester Workshops on 11-Jul-64. Photograph by A. R. Etherington
8. WD 825 (AB 354/1941) - the cab style identifies this unique loco, rebuilt at Bicester Workshops sometime in the late 1950s. Seen outside Bicester workshops, 11-Jul-64, photograph by A. R. Etherington
9. Army 835 (DC 2181/VF 5262/1945) - The Standard 153 HP 0-4-0dM was assembled by both Barclay and Drewry. Seen outside Sudbury Depot, 18-Aug-64, photograph by R. K. Hateley
10. Army 867 (AB 342/1940) - one of the Barclay built locos, which saw service at a Royal Ordnance Factory before being taken into Army stock. Seen outside Sudbury Depot, 18-Aug-64 by R. K. Hateley
11. Army 850 (HE 2068/1940) - most of this batch of Hunslet locos served at Midlands depots, this one outside Ruddington Depot photographed on 20-Aug-64 by R. K. Hateley
12. Army 854 (JF 22890/1939) - few Fowler 150 HP locos went directly to the Army, but many were used at Royal Ordnance Factories and by the Air Ministry. Photographed outside Rotherwas Depot on 8-Apr-65 by R. K. Hateley
13. WD 857 (HE 2064/1940) - three Hunslet 0-6-0DM were built for underground use at Corsham. Here one is seen being rebuilt to normal loading gauge at Bicester Workshops, 11-Jul-64, photographed by R. K. Hateley
14. WD 883 (AW D58/1935) - the army operated may 0-6-0DE to LMS designs. This example is seen after sale to E. L. Pitt Ltd, at their Brackley Yard, Northamptonshire, on 4-Oct-64, photographed by R. K. Hateley
15. Army 873 (AB 512/1966), a number of locomotives destined for use in Germany were initially operated in England. This one is seen at the Longmoor open day on 3-Jun-67, before being shipped to the continent. Photograph by R. K. Hateley
16. WD 890 General Lord Robertson (S 10143/1963) - one Sentinel 0-8-DH was owned by the Army and is seen here at Longmoor on 3-Jun-67
17. Army 8210 (NBQ 27649/1959) - one of the 2nd batch of North British Locos seen here at Long Marston on 29-Jul-64 with the exhaust conditioning unit still fitted to the top of the loco
18. Army 8227, Hassan (RH 4680401/1962) - the only one of the batch of Ruston LSSH locos which was fitted with vacuum braking for working passenger stock. Photographed outside Longmoor on 1-May-65 by R. K. Hateley
19. WD 8311 (TH 130C/1963) - two Fowler 150 HP locos were rebuilt to 0-4-0DH by Thomas Hill Ltd. This one is seen shortly after delivery at Bicester Workshops, 11-Jul-64. Photo by R. K. Hateley
20. WD 8327 (RH 201980/1940) - one of the few Ruston 88DS locos in Army stock at Bicester Workshops, 11-Jul-64, photo by R. K. Hateley
21. Army 235 (AB 371/1945) - a standard 0-4-0DM after re-engining and renumbering into the 1968 series. Photographed outside Long Marston Depot on 24-Jul-90. Photo by A. J. Booth
22. Army 240 (EE 847/DC 2047/1934) - another unique locomotive originally with the LMS, seen here in Army service at Warminster Depot, 22-Aug-77 by R. K. Hateley
23. MOD 244 (RR 10244/1966) - two Sentinel 4wDH locos were purchased second hand, and gained running numbers corresponding to their works ones. Photographed outside RAF Chilmark, 21-Sep-1989 coupled to a break van by R. L. Waywell
24. Army 254 (TH 272V/1977) - many vanguard locos have been bought for the Army in recent years. Here, one of the first series is seen at Kineton Depot on 15-Jul-1978, photographed by R. K. Hateley
25. MOD 270 and 271 (TH V318 and V324/1987) photographed side by side inside Bicester Depot on 15-May-90. These two are the first two of the Thomas Hill (TH) 'Steelman Royale' locos at Bicester
26. MOD 276 Conductor (TH V319/1988) outside Bicester Depot on 15-May-90, photographed by R. L. Waywell
27. Army 406 (NBQ 27427/1955), one of the first batch of North British Locos, renumbered into the 1968 series. Photographed at Ludgershall by R. K. Hateley on 25-Aug-82
28. Army 410 (NBQ 27645/1959) - a second batch North British loco, renumbered into the 1968 series and now without exhaust conditioner. Photographed outside Bicester Depot on 4-Aug-79 by A. J. Booth
29. Army 420 (RH 459515/1961), a Ruston LSSH loco photographed at Bramley Depot, 13-Aug-70 by R. K. Hateley
30. Army 601 (Derby/1945) - the only LMS design shunter to be renumbered into the 1968 series, here seen at Bicester Depot, 31-Mar-79 and photographed by R. K. Hateley
31. Army 622 (AB 502/1965) - the Barclay 0-8-0DH locos were unpopular and operated only at Bicester and Kineton. They are seen here in this photograph by R. K. Hateley at Bicester Depot on 31-Mar-79
32. Army 630 (AB 667/1984) - an impressive-looking powerful 0-6-0D ready for service in Germany, photographed here at Bicester Depot on 19-Sep-84
33. Army 878 (HE 9225/1984) - another batch of locos intended for use by BAOR, this one is seen under commissioning at Bicester Depot on 19-Sep-84. Photo by R. L. Waywell
34. Army 9024 (Wkm 7090/1955) - typical of the railcar fleet is this Wickham Trolley example seen at Kineton on 11-Aug-76 with sliding door and emergency rotating light on the top. Photo by R. K. Hateley
35. Army 9042 (Wkm 7391/1956) - a number of railcars were adapted for use as fire engines with this elaborate Wickham Trolley example being photographed outside Bicester Workshops on 11-Jul-64 by A. R. Etherington
36. WD 9043 (Wkm 6965/1955) - a less pretentious Wickham Trolley fire engine outside Bicester Workshops on 11-Jul-64, photographed by A. R. Etherington
37. Army 9114 (CE 5380/1 of 1968) - the newer generation of railcar depicted here outside Kineton on 15-Jul-78, photographed by R. K. Hateley
38. Army 9122 (BD 3711/1975), a newer style railcar outside Kineton on 15-Jul-78, photo by R. K. Hateley
39. LOD 758141 (RH 229633/1944), a typical narrow gauge Ruston stored at Bicester depot on 11-Jul-64, photograph by R. K. Hateley
40. LOD 758177 MSER 8 (HE 1939/1939) - a Hunslet example of the narrow gauge fleet, also stored at Bicester on 11-Jul-64, photo by R. K. Hateley
41. NG 25 and NG 24 (BD 3704 and 3703/1974) - two battery locos side by side in RAF Chilmark Depot, photo by R. L. Waywell
42. MOD NG 54 (AB 765/1988) - the most recent narrow gauge design for the MOD at RAF Chilmark on 15-May-89, photo by R. L. Waywell
43. Anna (Wkm 11547/1986) - one of the remotely controlled target Wickham trollies at Lulworth Camp, 15-May-89. Photo by R. L. Waywell
44. (Wkm 11621/1986) - the diesel powered maintenance vehicle at Lulworth on 15-May-89
45. AMW No.s 152 and 211 (JF 22602/1939 and 22958/1941) - two standard Fowler locos outside the typical Air Ministry locomotive shed at Carlisle Depot, 31-Jul-81
46. AMW 211 (JF 22958/1941) - a portrait of a widely used design of locomotive at Carlisle Depot, 31-Jul-81. Photo by R. K. Hateley
47. AMW 234 (GB 1893/1942) - an earlier generation of battery loco for underground use at Fault Depot on 15-Apr-67. Photo by R. K. Hateley
48. AMW 202 (RH 200800/1942) - the Air Ministry used many of the Ruston 48HP locos on their narrow gauge lines. One example is seen at Fauld Depot on 15-Apr-67. Photo by R. K. Hateley



Locomotives at War


Industrial Locomotives


Locomotives and the Army


Austerity Locomotives


WD (War Department) Locomotives


War Department Engines


Ruston & Hornsby Locomotives


Army Locomotives
Gasson, Harold. 'Signalling Days: Final Reminiscences of a Great Western Railwayman', published in 1981 in Great Britain by Oxford Publishing Co. in paperback, 120pp, ISBN 0860931188. Sorry, sold out, but click image above to access prebuilt search for this title on Amazon UK
1981, OPC, pbk
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  • Signalling Days: Final Reminiscences of a Great Western Railwayman [top]
    Written by Harold Gasson
    First published in 1981 in Great Britain by Oxford Publishing Company in paperback, 120pp, ISBN 0860931188
    Fourth publication in a series after: Firing Days; Footplate Days; and Nostalgic Days
    The author thanks the following for helping with this book:
    Jack Gardner, ex-Great Western Signalman
    Ken Robinson, Photographer
    Keith Barrow, ex-GWR Fireman
    Gordon Churchman, ex-GWR Signalman
    Brian Lowe, ex-Fleet Air Arm
    George Nickson, Locomotive Dept, Bluebell Railway
    Dave White, Locomotive Dept, Bluebell Railway
    John Harmsworth, Locomotive Dept, Bluebell Railway
    Peter Kelly, Editor of Steam Railway magazine

About the book: Harold Gasson talks about moving from the position of fireman in the Locomotive Department of British Railways into the position of signalman in the Traffic Department. The book is full of interesting facts and detail of what it was like to work in the railways at that time and the processes of changing career within that employer. The economic environment is evident in the reminscences - Harold talks of railwaymen leaving for better paid jobs in the motor industry, or the Atomic Energy Agency.

Contents:
1. The Parting
2. Back to School
3. Playing My Way In
4. Promotion
5. Consolidation
6. End of an Era

Illustrations:
1. The author enjoying a day out on the Bluebell Railway on August 31st, 1980|
2. The author's home shed - photo shows the rebuilding of the new shed
3. Didcot Foxhall Junction Box, just as it was completed
4. Interior of Foxhall Junction Box, showing duster over the lever
5. View from the window of Didcot West Box, with the Oxford lines going to the left of the picture
6. Coaling plant as new in Didcot shed, with the Provender Building in the right-hand distance
7. The author's first signal box, Milton, in 1950, of solid brick construction (now demolished)
8. Aerial view of Culham Airfield - the railway runs adjacent to the perimeter
9. A Sea Fury jet landing behind Culham Signalbox
10. A view of B52 bombers preparing to take-off behind Carterton Signalbox on the Fairford Branch
11. Polar Star, No. 70026 lying at rest at the bottom of the embankment after the Milton accident
12. Front view of Polar Star showing the lengths of rails clamped to the wheels prior to righting the engine
13. Block and tackle fixed to Polar Star ready for the 'big pull', showing the temporary track laid to haul the loco into the Milton Depot
14. Polar Star back upright
15. View of Polar Star's damaged side
16. No. 3212 pulling Polar Star out - shows temporary packing on the track work
17. Two of the author's favourite stations on the Didcot - Newbury line. The top photograph shows Compton with a three coach stopping train approaching the station with No. 30117 in charge. The lower photograph shows Hampstead Norris, a station with many memories for the author
18. The author's favourite engine, City of Truro, with a special waiting at Churn station. The unusual island platform and shelter did not help in the cold winter months
19. No. 3212 with a goods train sweeping round the curve at Pinewood Halt
20. No. 7311 takes up ploughing at Appleford in September 1952 (loco has come off tracks and gone into a field)
21. The aftermath of No. 7311. All that's left of Appleford Signalbox in September 1952
22. Bill Checkley, District Inspector, bottom left, surveys the damage of the accident
23. A further two stations of the Southern section of the Didcot, Newbury and Southampton Railway. The top photo shows Sutton Scotney and the lower No. 3212 standing in Winchester Chesil Station, just after leaving the tunnel
24. Didcot North Junction as the author remembered it showing trees painted on the signal box and building alongside (a wartime measure)
25. Wolvercote Junction Box, north of Oxford with a freight train waiting to come off the Worcester main line
26,27,28: Three local signalboxes around Oxford: Hinksey North; Morris Cowley and Oxford Station South
29. A mixed freight train going through Taplow with No. 5326 in charge
30. The end of the line! Paddington with its fine overall roof
31. Waiting to depart Horsted Keynes in August 1980
32. Footplate colleagues at Didcot in 1948: Driver Bill Trubey (seated), driver Bert Johns (behind), fireman John Bennetts (right), fireman John Smith (left)
33. The author's father: Harold Gasson Senior



Books on Signalling:


Other Harold Gasson Books:
Routledge, Gordon L. 'The Sorrows of Quintinshill', published in 2002 in Great Britain by Arthuret Publishers, in paperback, 80pp, no ISBN. Condition: very good, clean and tidy copy. Price: £40.00, not including post and packing, which is Amazon UK's standard charge (currently £2.80 for UK buyers, more for overseas customers)
2002, Arthuret Publishers, pbk
In stock, click image above to buy for £40.00, not including post and packing, which is Amazon UK's standard charge of £2.80 (for UK buyers)

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  • The Sorrows of Quintinshill [top]
    Written by Gordon L. Routledge
    First published in 2002 in Great Britain by Arthuret Publishers in paperback, 80pp, no ISBN

    Includes first hand accounts of what witnesses saw and experienced. Illustrated throughout with black and white images; assisted by track diagrams of how the disaster unfolded

About this book: On 22nd May 1915, 227 people lost their lives and 246 were injured as a result of the worst disaster in the history of British Railways, caused by non-adherence to the regulations of two signalmen: George Meakin and James Tinsley. Gretna Green with its romantic connections was the last place in the world one would have thought to associate with such a terrible tragedy. Local people became heroes as they fought through the burning and tangled wreckage to rescue the injured and comfort the dying
Five trains in total were involved in this disaster:

Trains involved:
1) A southbound troop train carrying 470 men and officers of the 7th Battalion Royal Scots including Christian Salveson (nephew of Lord Salveson, the shipping firm in Leith). Mostly carried men from Leith and Musselburgh. Driven by Francis Scott with fireman James Hannah, both of Etterby Carlisle. The carriages were all gas lit and made of wood. There were no corridors in these vehicles. They were an old type pressed into service for this journey because of the Great War
2) The London to Glasgow Express, carrying civilians - possibly holidaymakers and servicemen going home. It was 30 minutes late out of London Euston. Andrew Johnston was the driver and the fireman was John Graham. It was accompanied by a pilot engine driven by John Cowper with fireman David Todhunter. All four were from Carlisle. There were 13 carriages with a guard - Philip Thomas - and two attendants: Samuel Dyer and Richard Lewonski
3) A local slow passenger train from Carlisle to Beattock known to railwaymen as "the parliamentary" or "the parly". The engine was No. 907, a McIntosh Cardean Class, one of the largest engines owned by the Caledonian railway and not an engine they normally used on this route. It was driven by David Wallace and fired by George Hutchinson; the guard was Douglas Graham
4) A Welsh coal train returning to Pontypool Road, Wales after unloading at Grangemouth naval base. It was driven by Benson and fired by Grierson; William Young was the brakesman. Coal was not normally delivered to the fleet at Grangemouth by rail, but it was wartime and there were German subs in the North Sea, so it made more sense to deliver it by rail
5) A heavy goods train with 45 loaded wagons travelling North. Like the express, it was running late - in this case, a full hour late. It was driven by Richard Moss

Includes first hand descriptions from:
-Thomas Straiton who was going to work at the Plumpe farm in Gretna Green that fateful morning and on learning of the crash, headed straight up to Quintinshill to get the wounded and dead out of the carriages
Evidence given at the Railway Department Board of Trade Inquiry:
-George Meakin, 31 years old
-James Tinsley, 32 years old
-George Hutchinson, 30 years old
-Lieutenant J. C. Bell 1-7th Royal Scots
-Richard Lewonski, 64 years old
-Eric Herbert de Schmid, Chief Constable of Carlisle and director of the Fire Brigade



Other books about railway disasters
Gammell, Chris. 'Steam Sheds and Their Locomotives, published in 2007 by TAJ Books in hardback with dustjacket, 112pp, ISBN 9780711023956. Condition: New. Price: £12.75, not including p&p, which is Amazon's standard charge (currently £2.75 for UK buyers, more for overseas customers)
2007, TAJ Books, hbk
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  • Steam Sheds and Their Locomotives [top]
    Written by Chris Gammell
    First published in 1995 in Great Britain by Ian Allan Publishing Ltd
    Reprinted in 2007 in Great Britain by TAJ Books in hardback with dustjacket, 112pp, ISBN 9780711023956. Original UK retail price of this edition: £16.99
    Front cover, top photo: A view of Shed 11D, Tebay, taken by J. Phillips
    Front cover, bottom photo: The nameplate of 'Jubilee' class 4-6-0 Leander is seen being cleaned at Shildon in August 1975, taken by the author

About the book/synopsis: For almost 150 years steam was the essential source of power without which the railways of Britain could not have operated. At the peak, more than 20,000 steam locomotives ran the length and breadth of the country - some dedicated to the crack express routes, others to the more mundane freight and shunting duties. All these locomotives, however, had one thing in common they were allocated to or based at one of the network of sheds that dotted the landscape.
There were few major towns or cities that did not have at least one shed to service, house and replenish steam engines and it was to these locations that generations of enthusiasts were drawn in their desire both to log and to record steam.
In Steam Sheds and their Locomotives well-known railway photographer and author Chris Gammell has collected some 160 colour transparencies, the majority of which are previously unpublished, to recollect operation in the last decades of BR steam. Each group of sheds is discussed, with a sample allocation and historical introduction, from 1A (Willesden) through to 89A (Oswestry). As such, the book also provides the reader with an accessible guide to all the steam sheds that BR inherited in 1948.
With its superb selection of action shots from the great days of steam, Steam Sheds and their Locomotives is a excellent record of working steam

For each shed, the grouping is shown in a pink box detailing the principal shed and then working down to the minor establishments. The LMS shedcode system is used because this was adopted by the whole of the British Railways system in 1950. Sample allocations for each shed have been shown, mostly for the year 1959. Some 1950 allocations have been given. Shed closure dates where applicable have been included. Colour and b&w photos illustrate in general the locomotives and work of each shed grouping

Chapters:
Introduction
London Midland Region
1A Willesden
2A Rugby
3A Bescot
5A Crewe North
6A Chester
8A Edge Hill
9A Longsight
11A Barrow
12A Carlisle Kingmoor
14A Cricklewood
15A Wellingborough
16A Nottingham
17A Derby
18A Toton
21A Saltley
24A Accrington
26A Newton Heath
27A Bank Hall

Eastern Region
30A Stratford
31A Cambridge
32A Norwich Thorpe
33A Plaistow
34A King's Cross
36A Doncaster
40A Lincoln
41A Sheffield Darnall

North Eastern Region
50A York
51A Darlington
52A Gateshead
53A Hull (Dairycoates)
55A Leeds Holbeck
56A Wakefield


Scottish Region
60A Inverness
61A Kittybrewster
62A Thornton
63A Perth
64A St. Margarets
65A Eastfield, Glasgow
66A Polmadie
67A Corkerhill


Southern Region
70A Nine Elms
71A Eastleigh
72A Exmouth Junction
73A Stewarts Lane
75A Brighton


Western Region
81A Old Oak Common
82A Bristol Bath Road
83A Newton Abbott
84A Wolverhampton Stafford Road
85A Worcester
86A Newport
87A Neath
88A Cardiff Radyr
89A Oswestry

Index
Index of Steam Sheds



Other Steam Shed Books of Interest:


Other Titles by Chris Gammell:

 



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