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Titles to Look Out For:
[In Alphabetical Order. Date signifies earliest edition. Later editions covered by each listing]
1994. The 19th Century in Belgium: Architecture and Interior Design
1985. Contemporary Irish Church Architecture by Richard Hurley and Wilfrid Cantwell
1981. Dublin: Ninety Drawings by Brian Lalor
1992. A Guide to Canadian Architectural Styles by Leslie Maitland et al
1989. Legacies for the Future: Contemporary Architecture in Islamic Societies edited by Cynthia C. Davidson

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Vandenbreeden, Jos; Dierkens-Aubry. 'The 19th Century in Belgium', published in 1994 in Belgium in hardback with dustjacket, 240pp, ISBN 9020923161. Condition: Very good with some light handling wear to the dustjacket (very minor crumpling to the dustjacket edge in places). Price: £45.00, not including post and packing, which is Amazon's standard charge (currently £2.80 for UK buyers, more for overseas customers) 1994, Lannoo, hbk
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  • The 19th Century in Belgium [top]
    Written by Jos Vandenbreeden and Francoise Dierkens-Aubry; photographs by Christine Bastin and Jacques Evrard. English Translation by Ferdinand du Bois OMS, et al
    First published in 1994 in Belgium by Lannoo Nv, Tielt, in hardback with dustjacket, 240pp, ISBN 90 209 2316 1
    Published simultaneously in French by Editions Racine as Le XIXe Siecle en Belgique; and in Dutch by Lannoo as de 19de EEUW in Belgie
    In the same series as Art Nouveau in Belgium by Jos Vandenbreeden and Francoise Dierkens-Aubry; and Contemporary Architecture in Belgium by Geert Bekaert

About this book/synopsis: Beautifully illustrated in glossy colour plates and text throughout, this book does not aim at being a comprehensive historical survey but is intended to focus the reader's attention on the wealth and beauty of this part of the world's heritage that is under threat today and often thoughtlessly destroyed. We may not always be aware that by demolishing 19th-Century buildings, we are also blotting out the surviving traces of a certain craftsmanship that belonged to all trades (painters, decorators, cabinet-makers, casters, stonecutters...). A significant part of this book is dedicated to stylistic study and analysis. The basis for this has been the observation of the composition and decoration of the facade, without losing sight of the layout and interior decoration of the buildings themselves. Photographs are by Jacques Evrard and Christine Bastin

Chapters:
Foreword
Chapter 1. An Introduction to the century of eclecticism by Francoise Dierkens-Aubry: Introduction, New architectural layouts, the architect in the 19th Century; and Universal Exhibitions
Chapter 2. In Pursuit of a Style by Jos Vandenbreeden
NEO CLASSICISM: A neo-classical movement at the end of the 18th Century; Sober 19th-century neo-classicism as a means to urban beautification; Monumental building schemes, or consideration for public architecture; The terrace house versus the neo-Palladian country villa; A typology; The neo-classical streetscape
THE GOTHIC REVIVAL: The return to a national style; Restoration and new developments modelled on the Middle Ages; Architectural structures; The picturesque in architecture and in the townscape
ECLECTICISM: Eclecticism, a mixture of styles or neo-architecture; Various trends within eclecticism, from classical to exotic; The influence of bearing structures on eclectic architecture; Art in the street
THE RENAISSANCE REVIVAL: Via the Renaissance Revival towards a new national style: the neo-Flemish Renaissance Picturesque effects and the reappraisal of the town structure
TOWARDS ART NOUVEAU: A liberating style of architecture
Chapter 3. On imitation by Francoise Dierkens-Aubry:
STYLE AND INTERIOR DECORATION
PRIVATE HOUSES
INTERIOR ARRANGEMENT: Flats for letting, The middle-class house; The private mansion; The country house and the suburban house; The working-class house and social housing; SCULPTURE AS DECORATION IN THE CITY
'Statuomania'
Cemetery Architecture
THE 19TH CENTURY AND URBAN BEAUTIFICATION
EPILOGUE by Jos Vandenbreeden

Notes; Picture Credits; General Bibliography; Acknowledgements



Books on Belgian Architecture
Hurley, Richard. 'Contemporary Irish Church Architecture', published in 1985 in the Republic of Ireland by Gill and Macmillan in hardback with dustjacket, 144pp, ISBN 0717113361. Sorry, sold out, but click image to access prebuilt search for this title on Amazon UK
1985. Gill and Macmillan, hbk
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  • Contemporary Irish Church Architecture [top]
    Written by Richard Hurley and Wilfrid Cantwell. Introduction by Father Austin Flannery OP
    First published in 1985 in the Republic of Ireland by Gill and Macmillan in hardback with dustjacket, 144pp, ISBN 0717113361

About this book: The history of modern church architecture in Ireland goes back as far as the construction of Turner's Cross Church, Cork. Although this building did not have the impact it clearly deserved, the arrival of such a dramatic modern church on the Irish scene did not go unnoticed. Between this time and the advent of the Second Vatican Council, churches worthy of note are few in number. Nevertheless during the fifties and sixties, the ground was being prepared for the major church building programme brought about by social and economic development. The epoch-making changes in the liturgy at that time (the time of the Second Vatican Council) demanded a new environment and new ways of presenting the image of the Church in the world. Church architecture worldwide had undergone tremendous change following the Second World War what with the rebuilding of all the destroyed churches, but Catholic churches in particular saw an intense building programme (post 1964) reinforcing changes in the Church's Liturgy following the Second Vatican Council. As background to this, the 1960s was additionally a time of change for construction techniques and the types of materials used in buildings (think concrete just as an example)... and Ireland did not escape the shifts in social structures. The massive urban developments demanded new solutions from architects as they strove to present a valid image of the Church in the modern world.

These were the major problems that architects were called upon to solve. The high quality of many modern Irish churches has not been sufficiently recognised: similarly, the significant contribution in the field of Sacred Art by Irish artists and craftsmen. The authors of this book examine forty parish churches and trace the development of church architecture in Ireland from 1937 through to the present day. Thirty-five of the churches were built within the 20 year period post-1964 up until this book was published in 1985.

The book includes a number of new Dublin churches, built to respond to the huge population growth in the outer suburbs of the city, but unfortunately, because of its focus on the parish church, it does not include what is the largest church built in Ireland in the latter half of the 20th Century - that of the Church of Our Lady Queen of Ireland at Knock (designed by Daithi P. Hanly with accommodation for about 7,500 pilgrims) which was visited by Pope John Paul II and raised to the rank of a basilica. Austin Flannery, OP contributes an in-depth review of the historical development of modern church architecture and liturgy on a worldwide scale. The book is superbly illustrated by way of drawings and photographs which demonstrate a church's outstanding features; these are combined with commentary and appraisal of each church building

Contents:
Foreword; Preface; Introduction
1937. Christ the King, Turner's Cross, Cork
1951. Holy Rosary, Ennis Road, Limerick
1954. Chapel at Rossguill, Co. Donegal
1955. Mortuary Chapel, Naas, Co. Kildare
1959. St. Brigid's, Curragh Camp, Co. Kildare
1964. St. Colmcille's, Tully, Co. Galway
1964. Corpus Christi, Knockanure, Co. Kerry
1964. Our Lady Queen of Heaven, Dublin Airport
1965. Convent Chapel, Cookstown, Co. Tyrone
1965. St. Dominics, Athy, Co. Kildare
1965. St. Theresa's, Sion Mills, Co. Tyrone
1966. St. Mary's, Tameraherin, Co. Derry
1967. St. Aengus's, Burt, Co. Donegal
1968. St. Catherine's, Orristown, Co. Meath
1970. St. Patrick's, Carlow
1971. St. Michael's, Creeslough, Co. Donegal
1971. Church of the Holy Spirit, St. Leonard's, Co. Wexford
1973. St. Fintan's, Sutton, Co. Dublin
1973. St. Michael's, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin
1973. St. Mary's, Cong, Co. Mayo
1973. Holy Cross, Sligo
1974. Our Lady of Mercy, Inniskeen, Co. Monaghan
1974. SMA House Chapel, Maynooth, Co. Kildare
1974. St. Colmcille's Glenties, Co. Donegal
1975. Holy Cross Abbey, Thurles, Co. Tipperary
1975. Our Lady of the Nativity, Newtown, Co. Kildare
1976. Franciscan Abbey, Multyfarnham, Co. Westmeath
1976. Our Lady of Lourdes, Steelstown, Co. Derry
1977. Mary Immaculate Queen, Barna, Co. Galway
1977. Christ Prince of Peace, Fossa, Co. Kerry
1978. Church of the Holy Trinity, Donaghmeade, Co.Dublin
1979. Our Lady of Mount Carmel, Firhouse, Co. Dublin
1980. Irish Institute for Pastoral Liturgy, Carlow
1980. Duiske Abbey, Graiguenamanagh, Co. Kilkenny
1980. St. Colmcille's, Knocklyon, Co. Dublin
1982. St. Stephen's, Killiney, Co. Dublin
1982. St. Laurence O'Toole's, Baldoyle, Co. Dublin
1982. Church of the Apostles, Wyattville, Co. Dublin
1983. Church of the Incarnate, Fettercairn, Tallaght, Co. Dublin
1983. Immaculate Heart of Mary, Rowlah, Co. Dublin
Footnotes to Introduction
Acknowledgements; Index

 

Irish Church Architecture

Modern Church Architecture
Lalor, Brian. 'Dublin:Ninety Drawings by Brian Lalor', published in 1981 by Routledge & Kegan Paul in hardcover with dustjacket, 136pp, ISBN 0710008090. Near fine condition, with previous owner's ink stamp on title page (neat & inobtrusive). A highly collectable, well looked-after copy. Price: £27.85, not including p&p, which is Amazon's standard charge (currently £2.75 for UK buyers, more for overseas customers)
1981, Routledge & Kegan Paul
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Contents: The book is beautifully illustrated-it is a portrait of the city in a series of pen drawings, conceived as a series of intimate interrelated impressions, presenting the city in a many-textured pattern. The book covers a number of themes which subtly interweave with each other. Different periods of history, from medieval times to the present day, religion, the political struggles of the past, the slums and tenements of the present, and of course the many writers, artists and wits who at various times walked the streets of Dublin-all are represented by some definite area of the city depicted in these drawings. The architecture and thought of the 18th Century, for which Dublin is famous, underlie all these themes, running through the city, and so through the book, like the Liffy.

By focusing on some of the most off and often overlooked aspects of Dublin, Brian Lalor reflects the very essence and spirt of the city and its inhabitants.

Chapters:
Forms and Patterns: An Introduction

Kildare Street
Dame Court
Ardee Street
Beechwood Avenue
Castlewood Avenue
Stephen's Green, South
Westland Row
River Liffey from Custom House Quay

That Goodly Company

No. 1. Merrion Square
No. 16. Harcourt Street
No. 12. Upper Dorset Street
No. 28. Malahide Road
No. 82. Merrion Square
Dean Street
No. 62. Pembroke Road
Fishamble Street
No. 21. Westland Road
No. 70. Merrion Square
No. 11. Harcourt Terrace
No. 7. Eccles Street
Werburgh Street
No. 33. Synge Street
Werburgh Street
Bridge Street

The Age of Reason

Trinity College
South King Street
Royal Hospital, Kilmainham
Marsh's Library, Kevin Street
Ormond Quay
Henrietta Street
Dame Lane
Hume Street
Patrick's Close
North Anne Street
Trinity College
South Frederick Street
Merchant's Arch
City Basin
Trinity College
Baggot Street
Kildare Street
Cavendish Row
North Great George's Street
Fownes Street

Liberties and Shambles

Adelaide Road
Gardiner Place
Parnell Street
Gardiner Street/Sean McDermott Street
Crampton Court
Paradise Place
Lower Stephen Street
Meath Street
Kevin Street Upper
North Great George's Street

Belief

O'Connell Street
St. Patrick's Cathedral
Emmet Street
Essex Quay
Protestant Row
Fairview Strand
St Michan's Church
St. Michan's Church
St. Peter's Church, Aungier Street
Gardiner Place
Kevin Street
Pearse Street
Grattan Bridge
Merrion Row
Thomas Street
Parnell Square

The Medieval City

Christ Church Cathedral
Christ Church Cathedral and Wood Quay
St. Patrick's Cathedral
St. Mary's Abbey, Meeting House Lane
Cook Street
Cook Street
Cook Street
Thundercut Alley

Castle and Crown

Kilmainham Prison
Cork Hill
Kilmainham Prison
Kilmainham Prison
King's Inns
Royal Hospital, Kilmainham
Mountjoy Jail
Ship Street
Kilmainham Prison
Dublin Castle

Conclusion

Summer Row
Ship Street
The Coombe

1981, hardback, Routledge & Kegan Paul

1983, Paperback, Routledge & Kegan Paul

City Drawings

Drawings-buildings

Paintings of Dublin
Maitland, Leslie; Hucker, Jacqueline; Ricketts, Shannon. 'A Guide to Canadian Architectural Styles' published by Broadview Press in 1999 (reprint), 223pp, ISBN 1551110024. Condition: very good, clean and tidy copy, well looked-after. Price: £7.20, not including post and packing, which is Amazon UK's standard charge (currently £2.80 for UK buyers; more for overseas customers)
1999, Broadview Press, pbk

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  • A Guide to Canadian Architectural Styles [top]
    Written by Leslie Maitland; Jacqueline Hucker; and Shannon Ricketts
    First published in 1992 in Canada by Broadview Press and reprinted in 1999, in paperback, 222pp, ISBN 1551110024
  • Canadian Cataloguing in Publication Data:
    Maitland, Leslie
    A guide to Canadian architectural styles ISBN 1-55111-004-0 (bound), ISBN 1-55111-002-4 (pbk.)
    1. Architecture - Canada. I.Ricketts, Shannon.
    II. Hucker, Jacqueline. III. Title.
    NA740.M35 1992........720' .971........C92-094867-7

About this book: How often have you looked with interest at a Canadian building, and thought that you would like to know more about its style? Does it embody elements peculiar to Canada as a whole, or to the region? Does it represent a revival or imitation of an English or Continental style? When did this style flourish, and why? When and why did it decline? A Guide to Canadian Architectural Styles is the first book to provide answers to these and myriad other questions. Both a field guide for the traveller and a reference book for loves of architecture, this book explores as never before the variations in structures peculiar to specific towns, cities and provinces. This volume follows the development of the styles that have shaped Canada's built environment from the first structures, through the early settlement period, the nineteenth century, and right up to modern times. And it remarks upon special forms such as religious architecture; civic, domestic, commercial and industrial design

Contents:
Foreword
Building in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries:
The Seventeenth Century
The Eighteenth Century
The Quebec Style
The Palladian Style

The Nineteenth Century:
The Neoclassical Style
The Gothic Revival Styles
a) The Romantic Gothic Revival Style
b) the Ecclesiological Gothic Revival
The Italianate Style
The Second Empire Style
French Gothic Revival
The High Victorian Gothic Revival Style
The Romanesque Revival Style
The Chateau Style
The Queen Anne Revival Style

The Twentieth Century:
The Beaux-Arts Style
The Edwardian Classical Style
The Chicago Style
The Modern Classical Style
The Art Deco Style
The Moderne Style
The Twentieth Century Revival Styles
- The Georgian Revival Style
- The Tudor Revival Style
- The Spanish Colonial Revival Style
- The Quebec Revival Style
The Arts and Crafts Movement
The Modern Gothic Style
The Prairie Style
The International Style
The Brutalist Style
The Expressionist Style
The Post-Modern Style

Glossary; Further Reading

Illustrations (All of these are black and white plates (photos))
The Quebec Style:
p16. Black and white photograph of a warehouse built in 1889 at Fort St. James, British Columbia
p17. B&W photograph of Du Calvet House (1770), 401 St. Paul Street, Montreal, Quebec
p18. B&W photograph of Manoir Mauvide-Genest (1734), 783 Avenue Royale, Saint Jean, Quebec, also known as a maison traditionelle with characteristic bellcast flare of the roof
p19. B&W photograph of Notre-Dame-des-Victoires (1688 and subsequent dates), 9-1 Place Royale, Quebec. By Claude Baillif and others
p20. B&W photograph of a seminaire (1675-1875); 1, cote de la Fabrique, Quebec City (various architects)
The Palladian Style
p23. B&W photo of the Holy Trinity Anglican Cathedral (1800-1804), 31 Desjardins, Quebec City, Quebec (Captain Hall and Major Robe, architects
p24. B&W photo of the former government house (1826-1828), 20 Woodstock Road, Fredericton, New Brunswick. Architect: J. F. Woolford
p26. B&W photo of Admiralty house (built circa 1815-1819), Gottingen Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia
p27. B&W photo of 58 St. Louis (1830), Quebec City, Quebec (a three bay wide townhouse)
p28. B&W photo of St. Mary's Anglican Church (1790), in Auburn, Nova Scotia, built by W. Matthews - a scaled-down Palladianism
p29. B&W photo of The Mill Restaurant (1842), 555 Ottawa River Parkway, Ontario - a building of simplified Classicism
The Neoclassical Style
p37. B&W photo of a Colonial Building (1847-50), 78 Military Road, St. John's, Newfoundland by the architect Patrick Kough - an example of an institutional building, one of many needed for the rapid expansion of British North America. The entrance is through the monumental portico in an Ionic style
p37. B&W photo of Rockwood Villa (1841-1842), 740 King Street West, Kingston, Ontario by the architect George Browne. This is a freestanding house with a centre door often capped by a fanlight and flanked by sidelights or pilasters
p38. B&W photo of 9 Haldiman (circa 1830), Quebec City, Quebec - a townhouse
p39. B&W photo of Saint-Gregoire (1850), Nicolet, Quebec by architect Augustin Leblanc - a neoclassical church with a rich and complex surface treatment influenced by French Neoclassicism
p40. B&W photo of Queen's County Court House (1854), 141 Church Street, Liverpool, Nova Scotia by the architect William C. Hammond inspired by Greek temple architecture. As such it has a simple order of Greek Doric columns with a prominent frieze and entablature
p41. B&W photo of 5270 Morris Street (circa. 1834), Halifax, Nova Scotia - the entrance is flanked by Ionic pilasters
p42. B&W photo of the Victoria and Grey Trust Building (1842) at the corner of William and Brock Streets in Kingston, Ontario, by the architect George Browne, a rare early 19th Century commercial building with a handsome arcade of columns at its base
The Romantic Gothic Revival Style
p45. B&W photo of Notre Dame (1823-29), Place d'Armes, Montreal, Quebec by the architect James O'Donnell, which shows classical styling in the strong horizontal lines of the stringcourses and the rectilinearity of the design
p46. B&W photo of St. John's Anglican Church (1824-25), 85 Carleton Street, Saint John, New Brunswick by the architect John Cunningham - an example of the early phase of the Romantic Gothic revival. The building shows classical proportions and a pediment in the triangulation of the gable end with an Ogive arch over the main door, which is Moorish in origin
p47. B&W photo of Middlesex County Courthouse (1827-1831), 399 Ridout Street North, London, Ontario by the architect John Ewart. The building shows some Gothic Revival label mouldings round the doors and windows and some crenellation along the roofline
p48. B&W photo of 152 Watson Street, (circa 1840), Saint John, New Brunswick by the architect John Cunningham. It shows Gothic Revival label mouldings around the doors and drip mouldings along the eaves
p49. B&W photo of St. Andrew's Anglican Church (1845-49), in Lockport, Manitoba, which has pointed windows in the Gothic Revival style, ornamenting a solid, unadorned exterior
p50. B&W photo of St. Paul's Anglican Church (1902), Dawson, Yukon Territories - a church which was erected nearly eighty years after the first appearance of the Gothic Revival style. It has low, horizontal lines and a sense of rectangularity, all essentially classical in spirit
The Ecclesiological Gothic Revival
p53. B&W photo of Christ Church Anglican Cathedral (1845-1853), 100 Brunswick Street, Fredericton, New Brunswick by the architect Frank Wills
p54. B&W photo of St. Paul's Presbyterian Church (1854-1857), 56 James Street North, Hamilton, Ontario by the architect William Thomas
p55. B&W photo of St. Saviour's (1870), Barkerville, British Columbia, which shows the adaptation of the Gothic Revival (which was essentially a masonry style) to wooden church construction
p56. B&W photo of St. Paul's Anglican Church (1892), 1 Church Street, Trinity, Newfoundland by the architect Stephen C. Earle. The main volume of the church is surrounded by subsidiary volumes enclosing aisles, porches, and a chancel
p57. B&W photo of 115 Dorset Street West (1847), Port Hope, Ontario, where one pointed window and trefoils in the gable ends suggest that the owner was fond of the Gothic style
The Italianate Style
p60. Bellevue House (circa 1841), 35 Centre Street, Kingston, Ontario. This house, once the home of Sir John A. Macdonald, is believed to be one of the oldest Italianate buildings erected in Canada
p61, top, b&w photo of City Hall (1856-1867), 59 Carden Street, Guelph, Ontario designed by the architect William Thomas. Guelph City Hall shows some remaining Neoclassical influence, but the exuberant treatment of its pedimented frontispiece with elaborate door surround, elegant venetian window and ornamental balcony are firmly in the Italianate sphere
p61, bottom, b&w photo of 151 Victoria Avenue (circa 1867), Belleville Ontario, shows Italianate features in its projecting frontispiece and a cupola instead of a tower
p62. B&W photo of the Law Courts (1874-1876), 171 Richmond Street, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island by the architect Thomas Alley. The Italianate was a very popular style for public buildings. This building has the quiet grandeur of the Italian palazzo with the division of the storeys into elevated basement, main storey, and upper; and the application of Italian Renaissance details such as the voussoirs and prominent keystones over the windows
p63. B&W photo of the Former Coombs English Shoe Store (1860), 1883-85 Granville Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia - which is a three-storey building with evenly sized round-arched windows, decorated cornice and flat roof - all typical of Italianate commercial buildings erected in Canada in the 1850s and 1860s. It is also an early example of a cast-iron facade
The Second Empire Style
p65. B&W photo of the Legislative Assembly Building (1877-1887), Dufferin Avenue, Quebec City, Quebec by the architect Eugene Taché. Basic components of the Second Empire style are very much evident in the building's mansard roofs, centre and corner pavilion massing, elaborate silhouette and rich classical ornament. Taché designed an important group of Quebec buildings in the French chateau and Second Empire styles
p66. B&W photo of the City Market (1874-1876), 47 Charlotte Street, Saint John, New Brunswick by the architects J.T.C McKean and G.E. Fairweather. The Second Empire features are restrained within the wall planes of the rectangular block
p67. B&W photo of Langevin Block (1883-1889), Wellington Street, Ottawa, Ontario by the architect Thomas Fuller. The Second Empire style is blended here with Romanesque Revival and Chateau Style details. It is evidenced by the round-arched windows
p68. B&W photo of Custom House (1873-1875), 1002 Wharf Street, Victoria, British Columbia by the architects of the Department of Public Works. This building is a typical example of the simplified Second Empire style employed by the federal Department of Public Works across the country in the 1870s and 1880s. The style is demonstrated in the mansard roof, segmental voussoirs with prominent keystones and the elaborate arched cornic over the main door. This building was the inspiration behind other public buildings built in the same style
p69. B&W photo of 30 Monkstown Road (1875), St. John's, Newfoundland by the architects J. and J. T. Southcott. Many Second Empire houses in Newfoundland were built by father and son architect partnerships like this house. At its heart is a typical Newfoundland house designed in the British classical tradition dressed up with Second Empire embellishments in the form of a bellcast mansard roof, round-headed dormers and two bay windows
p70. B&W photo of a rather grand and immense house at 201 Charles Street (built circa 1879) at Belleville in Ontario. It's a free-standing, two-storey residence built in a light-coloured brick with a patterned slate roof and a massing mansard roof with turned wooden porches (these features are typical of the style)
p71. B&W photo of 610 Buxton Street (1890-1891), Indian Head, Saskatchewan. This is a good example of an elaborate Second Empire style stone house in Indian Head. It stands out because most other prairie examples tend to be quite plain. This stands out because it has been built in a picturesque and playful way with exaggerated features such as an overblown mansard roof and decorative iron cresting; details which stand as a testament to the builder of the house. The author draws attention to the use of cinder blocks as column capitals
French Gothic Revival
p73. B&W photo of Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception (1876-1888), Norfolk Street, Guelph, Ontario by the architect Joseph Connolly, which though not a cathedral, is a monumental attempt to erect a French-style cathedral on Canadian soil, with its twin-towered facade, large rose windows, transepts, clerestory, polygonal apse and radiating chapels. Its design is directly influenced by the completion of Cologne Cathedral and the architect acquired his knowledge of Gothic Revival architecture in Ireland
p74. B&W photo of St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church (1912-1914), 238 2nd Avenue East, Medicine Hat, Alberta by the architect N. Cutler. The well-ordered monumentality of this church is quintessentially French Gothic and is regarded as the first large church in Canada to be build of reinforced concrete
p75. B&W photo of Notre-Dame du Sacré-Coeur (1909-1910), Sainte-Ursule Street, Quebec City, Quebec by the architect Francois-Xavier Berlinguet. The spirit of French Gothic is beautifully captured on the interior of this church where it is bathed in a luminous light filtered through and encompassing ring of stained-glass windows
p76. B&W photo of St. Dunstan's Roman Catholic Cathedral (1897-1907; rebuilt 1913-1919), 61 Great George Street, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island by the architects Francois-Xavier Berlinguet and J. M. Hunter for the interior decoration)
The High Victorian Gothic Revival Style
p78. B&W photo of the Library of Parliament (1859-1866; interior finished 1876), Parliament Hill, Ottawa, Ontario by the architects Fuller and Jones. The Library was designed in the manner of the round medieval chapter houses of Europe; its High Victorian Gothic style is evident in its compact geometric shape and the decorative handling of its differently coloured sandstones, copper roof, and iron cresting
p79. B&W photo of the post office (1884-1889) at 50 Victoria Street East, Amherst, Nova Scotia by the architect Thomas Fuller. This building is influenced by civic buildings of Northern Europe - it has a tall gable end-wall, steep roof and picturesque clock tower. The use of dark rusticated sandstone with a contrast of smooth stone trim round the pointed Gothic doors and windows is typical of the style's emphasis on decorative stonework
p80. B&W photo of St. James-the-Less Chapel (1860-1861), Parliament Street, Toronto, Ontario by the architect Frederick Cumberland. There's an emphasis on weight and geometric shapes whilst still retaining the much-admired picturesque silhouette in this church - it has a sturdy corner tower surmounted by a spire, a steep, over-sized roofs, low walls and prominent buttresses
p81. B&W photo of Tryon United Church (1881), Tryon, Prince Edward Island by the architect William Critchlow Harris). In the 2nd half of the 19th Century, the Atlantic provinces of Canada continued to develop their own versions of the Gothic revival in wood
p82. B&W photo of St. Andrew's Cathedral (1892), Blanshard Street, Victoria, British Columbia by the architects Maurice Perrault and Albert Mesnard. Its bold use of polychrome decoration and deliberately mismatched towers is distinctly High Victorian Gothic
p83. B&W photo of the Montreal Diocesan Theological College (1895-1896), 3475 University Avenue, Montreal, Quebec by the architect A. T. Taylor. This is a design that is more Gothic than anything else and borrows historical details from several periods chosen for their suitability to the overall design
The Romanesque Revival Style
p85. B&W photo of University College (built 1856), University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario by the architects Cumberland and Storm. This building is one of the earliest and best examples of the Romanesque Revival style. It takes inspiration from English (or Norman) Romanesque architecture, demonstrated by the projecting square tower with corner buttresses and round-arched entrance enriched by bands of stylized decoration and by tiers of varied round-arched windows. The design is closely based on that of Oxford University Museum, built in 1855-1859 by the architects Deane and Woodward with the help of John Ruskin
p86. B&W photo of the basilica of Saint John the Baptist Roman Catholic Church (begun 1845), St. John's, Newfoundland - this is a remarkable building for its time and place illustrating (as it does), the features of the Early Romanesque Revival as formulated by certain German architects. The architectural forms come essentially from 12th Century Italy including the towers capped by hip roofs and the facade with two tiers of arcades
p87. B&W photo of the Church of Saint Brigide (1878-1880), 1151 Alexandre-de-Seve Street, Montreal, Quebec by the architects Martin de Poitras and Martin. This church is in the stern Romanesque style of Northern France and has a prominent centre tower, round-arched openings and corner buttresses, all of which are quite typical
p88. B&W photo of Windsor Station (1888-1889), La Gauchetiere Street, Montreal, Quebec by the American architect Bruce Price; with the 1900-1906 additions designed by the architect Edward Maxwell; and the 1909-1914 additions designed by Walter S. Painter. Windsor Station is one of Canada's finest examples of a Richardsonian Romanesque building. Its simple, yet powerful massing and rough-faced stone work, together with its rhythmic lines on the tall wall arcades are important components of Richardson's bold compositions. It was built as the head office of the Canadian Pacific Railway. The very first train to leave headed for Port Moody, British Columbia on June 28th, 1886 and arrived at its destination on July 4th
p90. 37 Madison Avenue (1888-1890), Toronto, Ontario by the architect Edward James Lennox. This small house mixes a tempered Richardsonian Romanesque at ground leve with a lighter, playful Queen Anne Revival above
p91. Cardston Court House (1906-1908), 89 3rd Avenue, Cardston, Alberta. This building takes the Romanesque Revival and reduces it to its basic forms: rusticated stone and wide window voussoirs. This is a very late example of the form
p92. The Lyon Building (1883), 2217-225 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba by the architects Blackmore and Blackstone; with the two storey addition (1905-1906) designed by John H. G. Russell. The building derives its particular Romanesque Revival character from the large number and regular rhythm of its round-arched windows. The Romanesque Revival was popular for commercial buildings because it was easy to build and let in plenty of light
The Chateau Style
p94. The Grande Allée Drill Hall (1887), Quebec City, Quebec by the architect E.E. Taché - it was the first Canadian building to be designed in the Chateau Style
p95. Chateau Laurier (1908-1912), Confederation Square, Ottawa, Ontario by the architects Ross and MacFarlane - this hotel was the first in a chain of Chateau hotels constructed by the Grand Trunk Railway (later incorporated into the Canadian National Railway). It is characterised by smooth stone facades, a steeply pitched copper roof richly ornamented with dormer windows, finials and iron cresting
p95. The Angus McIntyre House (1894), 3490 Peel Street, Montreal, Quebec by the architect Edward Maxwell shows the Chateau details in the conical roof of the round tower, the steep roof and the gable windows, but also the weighty horizontal appearance of the house with its rough-faced masonry is typical of the Romanesque Revival
p96. Bessborough Hotel (1927), Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, by the architects John S. Archibald and John Schofield - the last in a great line of Chateau style railway hotels - it exhibits steep roofs ornamented with dormers, towers and tourelles; with walls of stone and brick ornamented with bay windows - all features popular with the travelling public
p97. West 10th Street (circa 1928), Vancouver, British Columbia. This is a mere two storey house, but was built in the chateau style with a round-towered entrance hall with a conical roof and small windows
The Queen Anne Revival Style
p100. The Laurentian Club (1909), 252 Metcalfe Street, Ottawa, Ontario by the architect John W.H. Watts. A visitor to Canada will find the greatest number of Queen Anne Revival houses built in Ontario mainly because the province was prosperous at the end of the century. Houses like the Laurentian club have red brick and contrasting trim with a variety of window types, such as Venetian and bay and motifs that are both classical and medieval such as the shaped pediment and the tower; there is also a complex, many-gabled roof with prominent chimneys
p101, top. The Hammond Residence (1889), 118 York Street, Sackville, New Brunswick by the architects Burke and Horwood. Queen Anne Revival houses in the Atlantic provinces were predominantly wood, as here with this house. They were often a lively combination of clapboard and shaped shingles. Some houses were covered entirely by shingles
p101, bottom. Hooper Residence, 243 Kingston Street, Victoria, British Columbia by the architect Thomas Hooper. A characteristic West Coast Queen Anne Revival House is the bungalow. A verandah is an essential feature of these buildings and wood is a favourite medium used in clapboard and shingle combinations
p102. Roslyn Court Apartments (1909), 105 Roslyn Road, Winnipeg, Manitoba by the arthitect William Wallace Blair. The Queen Anne Revival Style offered designers interesting ideas they could try on apartment buildings - for example using different window types like advancing bays and pavilions and contrasts of red brick and pale stone trim with a variegated roofline
p103. Dundas Terrace (1889), Water Street, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island by the architects W. C. Harris. The architect has designed this building using the same principles as the Queen Anne Style - balances of vertical and horizontal lines; porches, steep roof with dormers and a variety of window sizes and textured surfaces
p104. Roger's Chocolates (1903), 913 Government Street, Victoria, British Columbia, by the architects Hooper and Watkins. The Queen Anne Revival Style was ideal for commercial properties for its informality, festive quality and eclectic approach to design that allowed for great freedom of planning such as the bay and oriel windows here suitable for displaying merchandise
p105. South Park Elementary School (1894), 508 Douglas Street, Victoria, British Columbia by the architect W. R. Wilson. The movement to construct comprehensive public school education led to the building of school buildings across the country with red brick making an inexpensive, fireproof construction; and the overarching Queen Anne style allowing much flexibility
The Beaux Arts Style
p112. Union Station (1919-1927), 65-75 Front Street West, Toronto, Ontario by the architects Ross and Macdonald. Some of the finest buildings in Canada in the Beaux Arts style are public railway stations, with the most magnificent of them being the Toronto Union Station. The axial planning of the style with principal paths of movement clearly laid out and secondary paths leading off them was ideal for buildings handling large numbers of people. Externally, the building is monumental and bold and relatively severe
p114. Chateau Dufresne (1916-1918), 4040 Sherbrooke Street East, Montreal, Quebec by the architects Dufresne and Renard. The Beaux Arts style was never popular in Canada, making this building a rare example
p115. The Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (1901) on the corner of Front and Queen Streets, Dawson, Yukon. This is an example of a scaled-down version of Queen Anne style as applied to a small commercial building. The interiors are as usual well finished
p116. The Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (1906), Watson, Saskatchewan by the architects Darling and Pearson. This giant columned freestanding building with a large-scale entablature is a good example of a prefabricated Beaux-Arts bank building, which would have been among the earliest structures to appear in its (Western Canadian) community
p117. Théatre Capitole (1903), Place d'Youville, Quebec City, Quebec by the architects W. S. Painter, F. X. Berlinguet and R. P. Lemay. This building was the centrepiece in an urban square and looks as theatrical as the productions it staged. The curved mansard roof which has such a strong Parisienne flavour to it declares the very Frenchness of the design
p118. Child's building (1909), 207-11 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba (now demolished) by the architect J. H. G. Russell. The Beaux-Arts style offered a workable solution to the problem of designing highrises - here you can see the classical design styling at work - providing this building with a short base storey, a longer centre section where the principal storeys are situated and a shorter attic storey. The drawback is that decorative details were banished to the attic section
The Edwardian Classical Style
p120. Birkbeck Building (1908-1910), 8-10 Adelaide Street East, Toronto, Ontario by the architect George W. Gouinlock. Steel framed with a concrete facade of grand design and eclectic sculptural decoration, it combines classical motifs with advanced modern technology
p121. The Saskatchewan Legislative Building (1907), Regina, Saskatchewan by the architects E and W.S. Maxwell, was praised for its English style, but owes much to the Beaux-Arts design and planning. The architects were typical of a number of Canadian architects who tempered the English baroque with the discipline of the Beaux-Arts
p122. The Post Office (1911), Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan (Dep.t of Public Works) shows a restrained version of Edwardian classicism with a jaunty corner cupola, well delineated cornice, strong corner quoining, pronounced keystones and voussoirs - all part of the classical vocabulary, are used freely to animate an otherwise functional building
p123. The Macdonald Engineering Building (1908), McGill University, Montreal, Quebec by the architects P. E. Nobbs is an example of contemporary British style being modified to suit local Canadian conditions - something that Percy Erskine Nobbs encouraged
The Chicago Style
p126. The Trapp Building (1912-1913), 668 Columbia Street, New Westminster, British Columbia by the architects Gardiner, Mercer and Gardiner, is a good example of The Chicago Style, employing a large area of glass on the facade, which allowed light in at a time when efficient electrical lighting was not always available
p127. The Union Bank Building (1903-1904), 504 Main Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba by the architects Darling and Pearson is a steel-frame building faced with brick and terracotta and divided into three zones on the facade, typical for a Chicago style building. This building has a double-storey base, tiers of intermediate storeys, and a heavily embellished attic storey
p128. The Daly Building (1905), Rideau Street, Ottawa, Ontario by the architect Moses C. Edey (now sadly demolished) reflects the fate of many fine early Chicago-style buildings, whose business-like severity did not win them the love of the public. This photo shows the grids of steel that carried the building's weight and large glass surfaces
p129. The Confederation Building (1912), 457 Main Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba by the architect J. Wilson Gray. Finished with terracotta and polished granite on the exterior, this steel-frame structure rises ten storeys on a reinforced concrete pad. The facade is divided into three distinct zones with large tripartite windows (typical features of the Chicago style)
p130. The Canada Building (1912-1913), 105 21st Street East, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan by the architects James Chisholm and Sons. This building retains much of its fine terracotta detailing
p131. McCallum-Hill Building (1912), 1876 Scarth Street, Regina, Saskatchewan by the architects Edgar Storey and William Van Egmond. This is a classic example of the Chicago style in Canada. It has the usual tripartite exterior organization, an overhanging cornice, Chicago windows and an application of decorative elements that is typical of the cautious interpretation of the style in small to medium-sized cities. The original fire escape has survived
The Modern Classical Style
p.134. City Hall (1935-1936), 453 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia by the architects Townley and Matheson. Modern classical buildings like this one were similar in design whatever their specific purpose and whereever they were built; generally with white exteriors or in some kind of neutral buff-coloured stone. The facades have classical features, such as the orders and classical mouldings, but they are highly stylized, flattened and abbreviated
p135. Federal building (1935-1937), 1975 Scarth Street, Regina, Saskatchewan, by the architects Reilly and Portnall. This building shows an unusual feature of The Modern Classical Style - imagination and invention. The architect has inverted some of the rules such as rounding the corners on the ground floor and the cutaway upper corners of the building. On most classical buildings, the entranceway projects. Here it recedes. The building has affinites with the Moderne style
p136. Federal Building (1934-1936), 98 Victoria Street, Amherst, Nova Scotia by the architect Leslie R. Fairn, is a bold and simple building with giant columns supporting a wide, plain, entablature. This was an excellent solution for large and small public buildings
p137. The Bank of Montreal (1930-1934), 144 Wellington Street, Ottawa, Ontario, by the architect Ernest I. Barott is a building that shows how modern classicism could give small buildings a huge sense of monumentality by quite simple methods. Giant pilasters many storeys high lead up to a mammoth entablature. The building has smooth surfaces which serve as a blank foil for the sculptural panels
p138. The Town Hall (1912-1913), 430 Main Street, Melville, Saskatchewan by the architects Storey and Van Egmond shows how modern classicism in its most reduced and economical form still provided dignity to modest structures. An interesting features here is that brick pilasters are reduced to mere panels
The Art Deco Style
p141. Marine Building (1929-1930), 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver, British Columbia by the architects McCarter and Nairne is one of the most delightful art deco book in Canada and typifies the application of detail to a skyscraper type of building. Note the beauty and intricacy of the sculpted details around the door
p142-143 - double page spread of the Toronto Postal Delivery building, the City Delivery Building (1939-1940), 16 Bay Street, Toronto, Ontario by the architect Charles B. Dolphin. The building displays a classical them in the flattened pilasters which separate the vertical banks of windows. To either side are bands of windows that wrap around the corners of the building, in defiance of all the classical rules of design. There are reliefs of airplanes and ships decorating the building
p144. The Bessborough Armoury (1932-1933), 2025 West 11th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia by the architect R. T. Perry. Most armouries built by the Department of National Defence were designed in medieval styles, but this one is Art Deco, although it's an unusual version because flat, vertical lines of Art Deco have been applied to the building to suggest something of the medieval design in the verticality - reminiscent of the Gothic Revival Style
p145. Cormier House (1930), 1418 Avenue des Pins West, Montreal, Quebec by the architect E. Cormier). Few private houses were built in the Art Deco style and the ones that were were built for the urban avant garde like this example (for the architect himself!) with vertical linearism and flat, blank spaces that serve as a foil for the focus of interest round the door and the long window at one side
p146. The Bank of Nova Scotia (1929-1930), at Prince and Hollis Streets, Halifax, Nova Scotia by the architect John M. Lyle, is a very conservative example although Art Deco styling can be seen in the sculptural details around the openings and inside. The design is conservative because the architect suppressed the Art Deco stylings so that it would fit in with the Palladian Style building Province House across the road.
p147. Balfour Building (1930), 119-121 Spadina Avenue, Toronto, Ontario by the architect Benjamin Brown is a smaller office building which successfully employed Art Deco: the styling is reserved for the areas round the doors and rooflines
The Moderne Style
p149. The former Toronto, Hamilton and Buffalo Railway Station (1931-1933), Hamilton, Ontario by the architects Fellheimer and Wagner is a radical departure from the classically inspired norm for most railway stations - this building uses strip windows, rounded corners and a decorative use of slick, polished metal showing the contemporary fascination with industrial design
p150. The Thomson Building (1939), Timmins, Ontario by the architects H. Sheppard and G. Masson is a combined newspaper office and broadcasting station erected by communications magnate Roy Thomson. It uses stucco and glass bricks, minimal ornamentation, sleek and curving surfaces, banded windows and flat roof - all hallmarks of the Moderne Style.
p151. Top. The Alexandra Bar (1940), Drumheller, Alberta by the builders B. Holoston and Jim Parsons is a late, but classic example of the streamlined shapes favoured in the Moderne Style. It has a sleek, horizontal profile and curved surfaces
p151. Bottom. The Garage Roadhouse, Wolfville, Nova Scotia is a former gas station, renovated to become a restaurant, but retaining its flat roof and "speed-stripe" accentuating the sweep of the rounded corner
THE TWENTIETH CENTURY REVIVAL STYLES
The Georgian Revival Style

p154. 32 Range Road (1930), Ottawa, by the architect W. E. Noffke, evokes the classically inspired stone homesteads built throughout the Ottawa Valley and the Rideau Canal corridor. Though quite plain, its door has sidelights and a toplight; there is also a bull's eye window.
p155. Provincial Court House (1928), 301 Prairie Street N.E., Weyburn, Saskatchewan by the architect Maurice Sharon employs a use of brick and white-painted wood trim that imitates the Colonial Revival Style Restorations of colonial Williamsburg. It has relieving arches around the ground-floor windows imitating American architecture of the revolutionary era, and quite elaborate detailing such as the prominent keystones, dentils under the eaves and tracery in the upper windows. These show the influence of the more formal Beaux-Arts design on the style
The Tudor Revival Style
p157. 27 Clemow Avenue (1929), Ottawa, Ontario by the architect W. E. Noffke is a good example of this style employing half-timbered gables, twisted chimney-pots, leaded windows, drip moulding and wrought ironwork
p157. Brock House (1913), Point Grey, Vancouver, British Columbia by the architects Maclure and Fox has a steeply pitched roof, prominent chimney, and mock half-timbering, all hallmarks of the Tudor Revival Style. The architects built several houses like this for wealthy clients in Vancouver and Victoria
The Spanish Colonial Revival Style
p159. The Capitol Theatre (1928), 509-517 3rd Avenue West, Prince Rupert, British Columbia by the architects W. Dodd and Company is an example of The Spanish Colonial Revival Style, which was used a lot on the design of cinemas during the 1920s and 1930s. It has an air of fantasy and strong suggested associations with California, which is entirely appropriate for this kind of building. Red tiling and stylised classical decorative motifs suggest a link to the Mediterranean
p160. The Former Fire Station No. 10 (1920), 260 Sunnyside Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario by the architect Werner Ernst Nofke, is a fantastical structure to find on a suburban Canadian street - it is evocative of the American Southwest and has a red tile roof, stucco cladding, and a prominent curved gable. All of these are motifs borrowed from the Spanish colonial era
The Quebec Revival Style
p162. Maison du jardinier (1922), 1240 chemin Bord-du-lac, Dorval, Quebec, by the architects Nobbs and Hyde - this is a romantic gardener's house in the grounds of a large estate with a low-pitched sloping roof with bellcast eaves (a hallmark of this style). The decorative embellishments distinguish it from the original style, which was quite plain
p163. Rideau Branch Public Library (1933-1934), 377 Rideau Street, Ottawa, Ontario by the architects J. P. MacLaren is a small public building distinguished by a steep hipped roof and an ornate central frontispiece. These together with the brick facing on the building suggest Jacobean and Norman design and indicate an attempt to form a new Canadian style from French and English origins
The Arts and Crafts Movement
p165, top. Fred H. Booth House (1922), 50 Goulburn Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario by the architect Charles J. Saxe is a prettified English-vernacular cottage featuring stucco walls, soft-looking imitation-thatch roofs and banks of casement windows. These are typical of the Arts and Crafts movement
p165, bottom. W. F. Hunting House (1912), 3689 Angus Drive, Vancouver, British Columbia - the steeply pitched roofline of this large house creates dramatic angles, accentuated by the smooth stucco finish. There are banks of windows, prominent chimneys and restrained decorative elements that show enjoyment of the geometric form. An English-style garden surrounds these houses - an important setting
The Modern Gothic Style
p167. Hart House, 7 Hart House Circle (1911-1919), University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario by the architects Henry Sproatt and Ernest Rolph). This building was designed in the great tradition of medieval universities like Oxford and Cambridge and is a highly sophisticated full-blown example of a modern Gothic Building with a low, horizontal line, strong massing, and muted Gothic motifs. It is built around an interior quadrangle with clear Beaux-Arts principles at work on its various facilities

p168. Saskatchewan Hall (1910), University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan by the architects Brown and Vallance is part of a group of Modern Gothic buildings. They are constructed with reinforced concrete and are faced in a locally quarried greystone
p169. St. Andrew's United Church (1912), Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan has simple straightforward outlines and like other Modern Gothic buildings, it is constructed of a uniform colour stone (or brick) and is inspired by the English Perpendicular of the late Middle Ages. The soaring height of the tower, the emphasis on flat wall surfaces and large windows are characteristic of the style
p170. Victoria Rifles Armoury (1934), Cathcart Street, Montreal, Quebec by the architect Jerome Spence. This building is distinguished from the 19th Century Gothic Revival prototypes by the monochromatic stone wall, tall wide windows with slender mullions and an almost flat Tudor arch crowning the doorway
p171. Centre Block, Parliament Hill (1916-1927), Ottawa, Ontario by the architect John A. Pearson with associate architect J. O. Marchand. This building has been designed in a monumental style with clearly articulated exterior and grand public entrance - all reflecting a rational and well-ordered interior plan - a hallmark of many modern Gothic buildings
The Prairie Style
p173. 166 Huron Street (1915), Ottawa, Ontario by the architect Francis Sullivan was designed by an admirer and former associate of Frank Lloyd Wright and uses clear, geometric shapes both in its massing and its decorative details. These characteristics along with the broad, sheltering eaves show how indebted Sullivan is to the Prairie style
p174. Natatorium (1932), Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan by the architects H. Hargreaves and N. L. Thompson. This building has a low-pitched, overhanging roof consistent with the Prairie Style, but it also has mock Tudor half-timbering and a prominent central doorway that exhibits stylized devices typical of Art Deco
p175. Horticulture Building (1914), Lansdowne Park, Ottawa, Ontario by the architect Francis Sullivan was designed as a horticultural display space on the grounds of the Central Canada Exhibition. It shows the influence of Frank Lloyd Wright's early work in the juxtaposition of cleanly defined cubic masses and the use of a flat roof with cantilevered eaves. The building has features typical of the disciplined and unified approach employed under The Prairie Style in the geometric placement of the windows and the restrained treatment of the decorative brickwork
The International Style
p179. The Mechanical Engineering Building (1948), University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario by the architects Allward and Gouinlock is an early example of this style. It has a severe planar surface, cubic massing and strip windows set flush to the wall surface. These are all hallmarks of this style
p180. Via Rail Station (1966), 200 Tremblay Road, Ottawa, Ontario by the architects J. B. Parkin and Associates is a later version of the style. It uses exposed steel trusswork and a frank expression of supporting elements combined in an elegant minimalist tour de force
p181. Shows a close up of the supports
p182. Oxner's IGA Foodliner (1958), 509-517 3rd Avenue West, Lunenburg, Nova Scotia by the Rodney Construction Company. The architecture of this building has been dictated to by its use - a rectangular box sheltering a convenience store (a large open area within walls and roof)
p183. The Toronto-Dominion Centre (1964-1971), Bay Street, Toronto, Ontario by the architects Mies Van der Rohe and John Parkin, with Bregman and Hamann. It's a tall, steel-and-glass tower familiar in cities worldwide and popularised by Mies Van der Rohe
p184. 3188 Stanley Street, North Vancouver, British Columbia is a modest home that shows how The International Style can affect even small, domestic buildings - here Strip windows and an open-grid canpoy are combined with traditional clapboarding in a translation of steel-and-concrete structures into Canadian wood construction
The Brutalist Style
p185. The National Arts Centre (1964-1969), Elgin Street, Ottawa, Ontario by the architects Affleck, Desbarats, Dimakopoulos, Lebensold and Sise. This large centre uses a series of triangles and hexagons as the basis of its plan. There is a juxtaposition of block-like masses, textured surfaces and minimal window space
p187. School of Architecture(1969), Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario by the architects J. Stinson and C. Corneil - this is a building which owes as much to Dutch Structuralists as it does to Brutalism. There are clear suggestions of post and lintel construction but it uses construction materials more typical of industrial buildings rather than machined finishes typical of International Style buildings. It has an unfinished look to it because the architect wanted the building to allow its users to adapt its flexible spaces according to need
p188. Manitoba Theatre Centre (1969-1970), 174 Market Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba by the Number Ten Architectural Group, is one of a score of Brutalist Style buildings constructed across Canada in the late 1960s and early 1970s with concrete used in abundance and large wall areas with minimal windows (very suitable for theatres)
p189. The Grande Théatre de Québec (1964-1970), Quebec City, Quebec by the architect V. Prus is again of concrete construction with complex massing
p190. Medical Centre (1964 and expanded 1970), University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, by the architects Thompson, Berwick and Pratt with McCarter, Nairn and Partners. This building was originally built in the International Style, but was expanded with Brutalist characteristics such as brightly coloured metal piers and concrete walls. There is complex massing and strong horizontals softened somewhat by cylindrical stair towers giving balance and diversity in the design and making it easy for the onlooker to understand the building
p191. Charlottetown Confederation Centre (1964), Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island by the architect D. Dimakopoulos is a grouping of three distinct buildings lits by skylights and connected by underground walkways typical of Brutalist planning and popular in Canada's cold, windswept winter cities. The building has been faced in Wallace sandstone and its size has been restrained above ground out of respect for the nearby 1847 Province Building
The Expressionist Style
p193. Top. Arctic Research Laboratory (1977), Igloolik, Northwest Territories by the architects Papineau, Gérin-Lajoie, Leblanc and Edwards (PGL architects). This is an unusual mushroom-shaped structure drawing inspiration from the Inuit igloo; and like the igloo, it contains a single room with laboratory units arrayed around the periphery. It is built as a steel skeleton on a concrete substructure and is clad in fibre-glass reinforced plastic
p193. Bottom. Heating & Cooling Plant, University of Regina (1967), Regina, Saskatchewan by the architect Clifford Weins who captures the strong, sweeping shapes of the open prairies with this structure, but its shape is derived solely from its structural system, which springs from pre-cast concrete A-frame units. This emphasis on structural engineering is typical of Expressionist style buildings
p194. Saint Mary's Church (1968), Red Deer, Alberta by the architect Douglas J. Cardinal) is a stunning building reminiscent of Le Corbusier's church of Notre-Dame du Haut at Ronchamp, France. The curvilinear brick walls echo natural forms. The early use of CAD (Computer Assisted Design) made it possible to create a sophisticated structure. There is a tent-like roof canopy suspended on pre-tensioned cables from a supporting ring beam
p195. Toronto City Hall (1965), Toronto, Ontario by the architects Viljo Revell with John B. Parkin Associates is a dramatic new city hall that captures the monumental possibilities of the Expressionist style. The building consists of a circular council chamber protected and supported for two thirds of its circumference by two office blocks
p196. Simon Fraser University (1965), South Burnaby, British Columbia by the architects Erickson and Massey with Zoltan S. Kiss, Robert Harrison, Rhone and Iredale, and Duncan McNab, Harry Lee and David Logan. The campus plan is based on the inter-relationship of academic faculties - four of them to be precise: the quadrangle, the library, the theatre and gymnasium, and the science block, all of which are connected by a skeleton of walkways. At the heart of the building is a three-storey central mall with a glazed roof of laminated fir beams tensioned by steel tie-rods
p197. Notre Dame des Champs (1963), Repentigny, Quebec by the architect Roger d'Astous. In the 1960s there was a time when several Roman Catholic churches were built that did not follow the traditional twin-tower design. This church splits the building into different volumes - an open-frame bell-tower, a sheltering marquee, a vaulted entry vestibule and the soaring body of the church proper. D'Astous studied under Frank Lloyd Wright
The Post-Modern Style
p199. Portage Place (1985-1987), North Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba by the architects RTKL Architects, Number Ten Architectural Group, Smith Carter Architects, IKOY Partnership, Austin Company, Webb Zerafa, Stechesen Katz and Cockburn McFeetors. With modern large-scale contemporary architectural projects, it's now common to involve lots of architects, engineers and construction companies. This building uses the common-all-garden pitched roof, but executes it in steel and glass in a reinterpretation

p200 and p201. Mississauga City Hall (1982-1987), Mississauga, Ontario by the architects E. Jones and M. Kirkland is a bold expression of Post-Modernism in Canada. Simple geometric shapes sit next to familiar building types like the gable-fronted structure and the rectangular commercial block. There's a touch of a futuristic look about it, but it does also bear resemblance to a group of farm buildings, or an animal feed distribution plant and silo. On page 201 is a side view of the rectangular commercial block with the clock tower to the right and rear of the picture
p202. National Gallery of Canada (1983-1988), Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario by the architect Moshe Safdie, is a huge structure whose main facade is hidden behind a complex glass cage that mirrors the shapes of the nearby Parliament buildings. Note - the architect denied employing Post-Modernism in this building, but the author states that the use of concrete and glass to reinterpret older masonry forms is typical of Post-Modernism
p203. A domestic house in West 2nd Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia which has been given a new facade, visibly apart from the original structure - a favourite technique of Post-Modern architects
p204. Bradley House (1977), North Hatley, Quebec by the architect Peter Rose is a house which mixes a variety of familiar vernacular shapes like pitched roofs and gable windows with Gothic-arched windows and traditional wood sheathing
 

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Davidson, Cynthia C. 'Legacies for the Future: Contemporary Architecture in Islamic Societies' edited by Cynthia C. Davidson, published in 1998 in Great Britain by Thames and Hudson in paperback, 175pp, ISBN 0500280878. Condition: New. Price: £3.99, not including post and packing, which is Amazon UK's standard charge (£2.80 for UK customers, more for overseas buyers
1998, Thames & Hudson, pbk
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About this book: Contains 252 incredible, glossy, illustrations, 103 in colour. There are also plenty of maps and schematic diagrams - all very nicely laid out (as in they engage the reader's interest and understanding). In the rapidly changing tastes and styles of Western Culture, the most highly acclaimed designs in contemporary architecture are often unconnected to the social and cultural contexts from which they spring. In contrast, in Islamic societies around the world, architecture often plays a far more responsible role, responding to the immediate needs of local and personal exigencies. As a result, some of the most humanist contemporary architecture is overlooked by the fashions of today's international design periodicals. To bring to global attention the work of architects and designers building in the Muslim world, the Aga Khan Award for Architecture was established in 1977. With an international jury made up of Western and non-Western experts and architects, the Award has helped foster a greater understanding of architecture in developing countries. Previous winners of the Award include a number of internationally acclaimed architects, such as Balkrishna Doshi, Ken Yeang, Jean Nouvel, Louis Kahn, Henning Larsen and Hassan Fathy. The seven projects chosen from hundreds by the jury are among the most fascinating and thoughtful work produced anywhere in the world. From the sensitive rehabilitation of Hebron's politically charged old town to a humanizing hospital for lepers, each project is profiled in depth with lucid texts, extensive drawings and specially commissioned photographs. Critical essays consider the challenges and potential rewards confronting architects and planners working in exceptional contexts

Contents:
The Aga Khan Award for Architecture
Introduction: The Pragmatics of Resistance by Cynthia C. Davidson
The Conscience of Architecture by Romi Khosla
Continuity in a Changing Tradition by Saleh Al-Hathloul
-Tradition and Continuity
-Urban Tradition
-The Architecture of the Muslim House
-Continuity in the Contemporary Architecture of Saudi Arabia
Pragmatism and the Built Environment by Arif Hasan


The Recipients of the 1998 Award
-Rehabilitation of Hebron Old Town - 1995 and ongoing. Planner/Conservator: Engineering Office of the Hebron Rehabilitation Committee. Client Hebron Rehabilitation Committee
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Slum Networking of Indore City, Indore, India. 1989, ongoing. Planner: Himansh Parikh. Client: Indore Development Authority
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Lepers Hospital, Chopda Taluka, India, completed 1985. Per Christian Brynildsen and Jan Olav Jensen. Client: Norwegian Free Evangelical Mission, India Trust
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Salinger Residence, Selangor, Malaysia, completed 1992. Architect: Jimmy C. S. Lim. Client: Rudin and Munira Salinger
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Tuwaiq Palace, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, completed 1985. Architects: OHO Joint Venture: Atelier Frei Otto; Buro Happold and Omrania. Client: Arriyadh Development Authority
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Alhamra Arts Council, Lahore, Pakistan, completed 1992. Architect: Nayyar Ali Dada. Client: Lahore Arts Council
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Vidhan Bhavan, Bhopal, India, completed 1996. Architect: Charles Correa. Client: The State Government of Madhya Pradesh

Master Jury Discussion
The Aga Khan Award As a Process of Thinking by Mohammed Arkoun
Legacies of the Future by Suha Ozkan
Project Data and Personnel

The 1998 Steering Committee
The 1998 Master Jury
The 1998 Award Technical Review

About the Editor and the Award Members
Cynthia C. Davidson was the editor of ANY (Architecture New York) Magazine and director of the international, millennial architecture research project, Anyone Corporation at the time when this book was published in 1998.
In 1998, the members for the Master Jury of the 7th cycle of the Award were: Professor Mohammed Arkoun, historian of Islamic thought, Paris; Zaha Hadid, architect, London; Arif Hasan, architect and planner, Karachi; Dr. Saleh Al-Hathloul, architect and planner, Riyadh; Arata Isozaki, architect, Tokyo; Professor Fredric Jameson, cultural theorist, Duke University, USA; Romi Khosla, architect and economist, New Delhi; Yuswadi Saliya, architect and architectural historian, Jakarta; Dogan Tekeli, architect, Istanbul




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